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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/20/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi everyone. I can finally stop kicking tires and truly be part of the club. Eternal thanks goes to Richard Simile and Don Kaye for their expert guidance and sticking with me despite my numerous questions! I could not have done this without them both. I am extremely pleased with this purchase. Now I need to build time and experience. Another thank you goes out to others in MS who answered questions and helped me home my selection. I hope I can pay back. Freddy
    5 points
  2. I am not sure how many of us on Mooneyspace have actually contracted COVID, I was defiantly one of the unlucky ones! mine started out as pretty benign, just mild flu symptoms. By the end of the first week I was in the emergency room, they pumped me full of steroids', magnesium and several other things. the next couple of days had me thinking I was on the mend and would be back to normal. then I went down hill, I apparently went into a mental fog, spent most of my time sleeping, and although i was up moving around I do not really remember about 4 days. my doctors put me on a Z pack a week after
    4 points
  3. My plane has been down for quite a while. Probably another month or so. Mostly flying other people’s planes. So by your criteria I’m a total looser
    4 points
  4. As long as the paperwork doesn't require it, you won't notice anything off center after an hour of flight.
    4 points
  5. Steps have some attraction to the older aviator. If you plan on aging or selling to one who fits that category, the option for a step might be worthwhile. In my youth I once was able to do a spin-leap onto the wing of DC-3. Now I sometimes wonder how I will get up from sumping the fuel . . .
    4 points
  6. It's gonna be a halfway warm weekend! Yaay again! I'm going flying tomorrow! Yaaaaay, Me! Anyone going anywhere in AL, GA or FL panhandle??? Flying with friends is much more fun.
    4 points
  7. The crank snout and prop attached to it are closed, with an inlet exposed to the pressure created by the governor. The piston inside the prop hub moves to equalize pressure between the input oil and the prop spring and prop forces (mostly the centrifugal twisting force). If the prop forces pushing back on the piston exceed the input pressure, it'll push the oil back out, and it'll either go out around the bearing journals or back through the governor (or both). The inlet to the crank snout is in the same bearing as the normal oil galley feeds to the #1 journal, and the governor feed
    4 points
  8. I see now that Dr. Susan Northrup has been appointed the new Federal Air Surgeon. I hope to see good things coming as she was the SE regional and before that worked for the airlines getting pilots back in the air. She wants to move away from snail mail to e-mail and getting faster responses. From what I have seen of her in the past, she has a pretty common sense approach so I hope things will improve.
    3 points
  9. I guess that kicks out the cfi’s since we fly different n numbers all the time
    3 points
  10. That's actually not a bad idea... My plane's been down since end of Sept. so you can ignore everything I post
    3 points
  11. Glad you’re feeling better. I’m ready for this to be over.
    3 points
  12. One of my favourite topics. I know people are skeptical, but we actually did some testing and on an old Mooney it is significant. Depending on your target speed the penalty of the step is 1 to as much as 4 kt. 4kts is WOT and trying to achieve true max cruise speeds. 1 kt is at slower “loiter speeds”. The reason is not purely the drag caused by the step....which is significant, but also because it puts the aircraft out of optimal trim. You can see this by looking at the ball with the step up vs down. With the step down you will induce an out of trim condition which impacts best cruise
    3 points
  13. Did someone call for a Bollt?
    3 points
  14. Do it in the Mooney, particularly the 40 hours of hood time. You’ll grow your retract time quickly and earn an IFR discount as well. Some insurances will allow you to prorate a discount based on hours mid year if you gain the experience.
    3 points
  15. I will have a life long resentment against AOPA finance. The banker they put me with said point blank “you can’t afford an airplane.” After lecturing him with a sharp tongue, I hung up on him, went thru EAA’s preferred vendors, had the money right away, and never missed a beat. I’ve also barred any banks that denied me capital loans in starting my business the opportunity of ever getting any of my future business. One of my petty grudges I choose to keep up. =) end rant
    3 points
  16. The fact that FAA hasn’t made certification for modern engine gauges a simple process is one of the most frustrating things. Lose attitude indication- might die. Lose airspeed indication, might die. Auto pilot malfunction/trim, might die. Lose RPM reading, shrug shoulders and fix as soon as practical. Lose fuel level, same. Lose MP, same. Lose oil pressure, cautiously land. WTF? EDM 830- not certified. Insight products, etc etc. Tell me those aren’t as good as the trash still existing in the retro fleet. I’ll wait.
    3 points
  17. This might be a little crass, but what the heck. I'll come forward and mention it. I've found that when I'm looking at advice and posts and I'm wondering about "how good or accurate" that advice might be, I harvest the commenter's tail number and head over to flightaware to take a look at their recent flight history. Shallow - yes. Invasive - yes. Illuminating - yes, I think so. Anyone else do this or am I the only scoundrel?
    2 points
  18. My wife and I got it through Christmas and New Years and we were very lucky. We both had it very light. Had colds much worse than this. It was an excuse to sit, isolate, and watch movies without any guilt. The worst part was losing taste and smell and not lose any weight.
    2 points
  19. Maybe Timmy should rate everyone's credibility while you're at it
    2 points
  20. I suspect a lot of the lore about cycling props a number of times to get warm oil into the hub is left over from World War II. Many World War II aircraft were equipped with Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers. Hydromatic propellers have a large hub with a lot of surface area that must hold a couple of quarts of typically 120W oil. It can get pretty thick when it's cold. These props also have a double acting piston, so oil coming in on one side pushes out the oil on the other. It was standard practice to cycle these props a few times until the response became acceptable. I think it's likely
    2 points
  21. Knock yourself out having your mechanic list six pages of discrepancies. As a seller my only responsibility is to deliver an airworthy airplane. I'll have the one or two issues identified as airworthiness addressed but the other 43 things are on the buyer. Too many buyers, especially first time buyers expect the seller to fix everything found on a pre-buy inspection. Sorry, this is a 50 (or 30 or 20) year old airplane. If you want factory new, you need to buy factory new.
    2 points
  22. The H means the head is drilled, the A at the end means there is no hole in the threaded end for a cotter pin.
    2 points
  23. And yet so many 337s get filled out and STCs sold for things that aren't defined as major alterations...
    2 points
  24. It’s funny because I sent him a piece of the door seal five years ago and had 30 people lined up for deposits and that whole thing blew up too. The gift keeps on giving, because my door seal was now too short to use for a door seal, I used it for the baggage door. Then when I ordered a cabin door still two years ago the BA706M seal from Brown changed suppliers , and it’s like flat and crushed and that was crap too so now there’s no door seal options
    2 points
  25. A personal eulogy for a long time friend. He is in a better place.
    2 points
  26. https://www.advancedpilot.com/articles.php?action=article&articleid=1838 "Remember, 50°F ROP is the worst possible mixture setting from a detonation standpoint, from an overall heat standpoint, and from a stress standpoint, because the peak pressures are occurring very soon after TDC, beating on that poor piston like the hammer of Thor." good read I think Disclaimer I was supposed to paste the whole article apparently, but I think linking it keeps the spirit of the Author's intent.
    2 points
  27. Unit, What’s the big deal... You have no fear of the virus... Other people do... I get it. Let’s not be mean to everyone because you don’t live in fear... It turns into an I’m better than you are argument faster than you can type... Its as fun as my plane is better than yours... Kind of takes the fun out of being part of MS... Its the weekend... yay! Best regards, -a-
    2 points
  28. The impulse coupling lag angle is 5 deg less than the advance, so I believe it fires at 5 deg BTDC in either case. Skip
    2 points
  29. Prop hub oil is typically dark no matter what the sump oil looks like.
    2 points
  30. I misunderstood your comment as suggesting that the higher C/R engine would benefit from more advance than its stock C/R brethren. Misfire on my part. I too would like to see the Lycoming's original data but my guess looking at Nigel's data is that 100ROP was their target mixture setting. My next guess is that for certification, 25° was found to be the best combo with consideration to power, temperature and low RPM operations. The SI you posted baffles me. I have never found the IO360 to be a challenge to cold start whether timed to 20° or 25° BTDC. I'm sure I wouldn't be able to discern t
    2 points
  31. My power supply failed. LEDs cost the same as replacing the one power supply. It was a really easy decision, and OSUAviatior, who participates on this site, sells them cheap.
    2 points
  32. When looked I saw a number of examples that had undergone a step-ectomy. Kinda like a Mooney bris in a way.
    2 points
  33. Hello This is to now share with you the repair went well. Problem of leakage is fixed back in the air Philip
    2 points
  34. I think that comes off a bit rude and naive. I don't think it's right to judge people for being afraid, considering that nearly half a million people died from it alone in the USA. I am under 30, in shape and not overweight, not diabetic, and have no known heart issues ( that I know of), so the risk for me is practically non existent. That however does not apply to a good amount of people that I know. Nearly everyone on this board can financially afford to get covid. We all own airplanes. Most people don't and most people can't afford an airplane, let alone taking paid time off, or the cost of
    2 points
  35. Tell that to my family members and friends who have died from it.
    2 points
  36. Hopefully this'll help as it sounds like we have the same cluster. As-removed from my 1968 G at last annual, replaced with an EDM900. EDM 900 pic included to show that it's a near-perfect fit where the original cluster goes. All gauges were working when removed and I plan on listing the whole set for sale along with the working as-removed fuel pressure/manifold pressure gauge. Engine is a Lycoming O-360-A1D, 26 gal tanks. The individual fuel gauges have different part numbers and different electrical connections as one is male, one is female (see pics). If you want to verify part num
    2 points
  37. Life changes, no matter how much we might not care for the change. I am very sad to hear this news. This is quite shocking. Stacey was an incredibly huge part of the Mooney legacy through so many transitions over so many years. He is, and was one of the “Boots” stars of our movie about the wonderful people who built Mooney and stuck with the factory for years and years, through it all. Stacey was a completely dedicated employee for the Mooney legacy. He was the main glue that helped keep all together. One could not ask for a more dedicated person. What a HUGE loss!! I’
    2 points
  38. The original manufacturer is Garwin Carruth, who sold this branch of digital instrumentation in the 80s and still exists under the name Sigma tek. The garwin" gauge cluster " is no longer manufactured nowadays but the plug-in indicators in this cluster are still available. These are the cluster gauges reference 169 L of which here is the link. For volume gauges, they are adjustable according to the resistance of the sensors and the graduations are either interchangeable with your model or to be specified in your order of new gauges. http://www.sigmatek.com/cluster_gauges.html
    2 points
  39. After a long process I finally bought into a 50/50 partnership in a Mooney Bravo, of N9149P. PS. anyone wanting a 1/3 share in a M20C in Indianapolis let me know ;-) I put 100s of hours on the M20C and enjoyed every moment. The lure of backseat leg room for the kids, TKS, O2, new airframe, and SPEED finally got to me when a friend offered me a share of his Bravo. It was a bit of a difficult path. While working on my IFR ticket I watched a Mooney Bravo crash at my airport (KHFY). That didn't stop me from flying, but it's an image that I can't ever forget. A few years later I sta
    1 point
  40. I am afraid I am also a looser by that criteria as I fall into the same boat as Rich, Paul & Robert, as my plane just came out of a long annual because I was too busy flying in other Mooney's. But 7 hrs on her in the first week on mine. But when I am not flying mine, I am mostly instructing in other Mooney's; usually longbody's and midbody's. But apparently still a total loser with 250 hrs in the last 12 month, with the majority in Mooney's - but that's okay In all seriousness, I do think your very wise though to not blindly take anonymous advice over the internet without lots of sk
    1 point
  41. Not necessarily true. I've seen things like left main tire tread at 75%, brakes worn to 50% of allowable, paint chip on cowl near prop, vacuum pump (and/or magnetos) with 350 hours TIS, paint on main gear needs touch up . . . None of those are airworthy, none should be addressed by the seller and all of that plus much more in the same vein has been listed on pre-buy squawk sheets I've seen. That is most certainly not a run down airplane that needs a lot of work. Unfortunately I've seen buyers walk away after getting results like this. That is a disservice to everyone involved.
    1 point
  42. I doubt that the soft stainless steel safety wire cut through the steel bolt. Either the bolt head has been ground thinner, exposing the hole, or someone has drilled their own hole through the bolt. Clarence
    1 point
  43. It’s been a few months. Good to have you back. Sorry about your friend.
    1 point
  44. They call me "hey you". But you can call me "hey".
    1 point
  45. Welcome Stuart Do you have a Cherokee to trade? My friend has a C model that he might trade in the classified ads here on Mooneyspace. Good lesson on insurance in the same thread...
    1 point
  46. the cam probably isn't worn, it is probably the follower on the points. It is plastic and wears. If you reset the points, you can easily get the last 100 hours out of it.
    1 point
  47. That approach and landing looked complex! Had to nail the approach, then the parachute, then a rocket lander? Go USA!
    1 point
  48. Skip, I think you are more knowledgeable on this particular subject than most people on this forum! You should give the 25 timing a try and let us know. I don't have a Surefly but now I'm curious. I'm just still disappointed that you can't replace both mags with a modern solution. Not sure I see the point of variable timing with one magneto and not the other. I maintain a fleet of Austro diesel powered electronically controlled Diamond aircraft and they work just fine. Add a separate power source (the Diamonds have a dedicated back up battery for the ECU) and you could have a modern, rel
    1 point
  49. I made a longer version, I did not have much material to work with tho. Hope it's entertaining in this time of lock-down! Stay healthy all.
    1 point
  50. Had both shots and I will be in hangar B-63. See ya there.
    1 point

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