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  1. 54 points
    My A/C failed on the Lancair and I found it to be the A/C drive unit shaft. After much searching I was given the name of a machine shop in a small town called Athens, WI, just west of Wausau. I was told the shop was owned by a Mennonite with exceptional machining skills and very fair pricing. During the work process the owner indicated a fascination in the fact I built my own plane and after talking about it with his kids, he mentioned they were excited as well and commented how much they desired to ride in a small airplane someday. I told him I would pick up the shaft when completed by flying my Mooney over to his local airport (3 hour drive, 35 minute flight) and would gladly give his kids an airplane ride. He had the shaft done in one day (Wednesday), and I had him make me a new pulley as well, which he completed this morning. Looking at weather, I asked if this evening would work to fly his kids and he stated that it did. He asked if a couple neighbor kids could get a ride too, and I said yes. I arrived at a local airport and had a greeting party waiting for me. The politeness (and curiosity) of everyone was simply amazing. I did two flights, with 3 kids each flight, flying over their houses and their small little town. On each flight the oldest boy in the front seat got to fly the plane for 5-10 minutes. Upon completing the second flight, I asked mom and dad if they wanted to go and they insisted I should get home before dark and they had flown before, but were amazingly grateful the kids were able to fly. Then one of the younger girls walked up and gave me a plate of some awesome brownies she made this afternoon for "their pilot". As I flew home I thought about the impact the flights had on these truly humble kids, who clearly live a lifestyle of a much more simple means (and I say that more out of respect and admiration than anything). Sometimes we get LUCKY, sharing what we love with others and then getting the rewarding, yet humble feeling I experienced during my flight home. Pretty COOL. Tom
  2. 44 points
    Hey everyone, I'm the pilot involved in this crash. I started writing up a summary of the events leading to to my accident but I'm having problems with my old laptop. My frostbite hands make using my phone and iPad difficult but I'll try to throw up some facts and field questions when I get a chance. The FAA is still investigating, but I'm 99℅ sure this was caused from CO Poisoning. This was the 3rd flight of the day and in hindsight I had CO poison symptoms most of the day. The heater/defrost was run full-on the whole time. 5 hrs after the accident CO Poisoning occurred as a possibility to me, my levels were then tested 15-18X higher than normal. I didn't have CO detection in the plane. I was dumb and naive to think that I would "know" when I was effected. I was way wrong! The problem was that the CO degrades ones cognitive ability to the point where you can't connect the symptoms with the cause. I passed out in the climb and woke up in a field. I am the luckiest man alive. Allot of things helped to have the great outcome I have been blessed with. 1- I was in a Mooney. The airplane gave it's life to save mine. I'm a huge believer in the "steel cage" and the full spar. 2- I was wearing a shoulder harness. I still busted up my face, I'm not sure how, but I don't think I would be here without it. 3- STec 30 auto pilot. I was flying with the heading bug when I passed out. The electric autopilot kept the wings level all the way down. The original PC system may have worked just as well, but the engine was windmilling from 12k to the ground. I don't know if there would have been enough vacuum. 4- it happened in the climb. I only have alt hold so it was tracking heading bug and trimmed for climb. As I was in the initial climb I still had in full power with full rich mixture. This resulted in a fuel burn in the 17-18.5 gal/hr. And only allowed the airplane to climb to around 12.5k. if it were leaned at all I would have went much higher, for allot longer. Being that I was oxygen starved and unconscious it probably would have been fatal. 5- ATC was awesome. Because of them search and rescue was underway before I crashed. After I woke up I had to get myself to help, once I did emergency responders were to me in a few min. My 121.5 ELT was working, but if I had a 406 I bet I would have been pulled from the airplane before I woke up. 6- luck, luck, luck, divine intervention, miracle, what ever you want to call it. I'm banged up, but should recover 100℅. I came home from the hospital on my daughter's 3rd birthday. It doesn't get any better than that. Cheers, Dan
  3. 33 points
    Yes, the pilot is here. Yes, I recently purchased the aircraft. I flew from Pensacola on Friday and landed at W75 with about 10 gallons remaining. I filled up Saturday morning (54 gallons on board) and was planning to continue to New England. I checked the fuel during preflight as usual and I saw no water. I looked at the windsock as I finished my preflight and it was about 5 knots with a slight crosswind, but favoring 19. My plan was to back taxi and use the full length of 19. I looked at the windsock again as I was about to taxi and it was limp. I don't have a voice recorder so I'm paraphrasing from what I remember. During taxi, Unicom asked me my direction of travel. I said north. Unicom said that the winds were light and variable, not favoring a particular runway, and that no traffic was known to be inbound. He said I could use 01 if I wanted to be closer to course. At this point I was at the one taxi intersection with 01/19 and he said I could take off from there or back taxi and 180. This is where I made my first mistake. The taxiway intersection is not in the middle of the field. It is closer to the approach end of 01. But if you look at the taxiway diagram it is a short runway and the intersection cuts off a significant amount. I allowed this distraction to alter my plan and I elected to takeoff runway 01 from the intersection without fully considering the decision. There are trees not far past the end of the runway. I don't normally climb at Vx, but as I saw the trees I pulled for Vx and made my second mistake. I over-rotated and entered a power on stall. As I was barely over the treetops while I was attempting to correct, but the sight of the trees right beneath me tempered my forward pitch correction and I re-stalled. I lost lift on the left wing, rolling left. I did not have enough control to really pick a spot at that point, but I had enough rudder to keep the nose between the trees. Or I didn't and it was luck. I honestly can't say. It happened pretty fast by that point. I am a Navy pilot and TOPGUN graduate. I have my ATP and CFII. I completed my BFR in a 182 just a couple of weeks before I bought the Mooney. I am meticulous about safety and planning. I used to preach to students about the three things a pilot can never use: fuel in the truck, runway behind you and altitude above you. I frequently talk about complacency as a major cause for accidents, not just in aviation. I want to be clear, I am not attempting to place any blame on the Unicom. However, I allowed that brief conversation to distract me from my very solid plan and change to a very poor one. The left wing sheared off from the tree on the left side. The right wing entered the house with the fuselage and was leaking fuel. Debris from the structure prevented me from being able to open the door enough for escape. Neighbors called 911 and told us to stay put, but fuel was leaking and I wanted us out. A man who happened to be at the airport and getting ready to fly saw everything from my intersection takeoff to stall. He jumped in his truck and found us. He took charge of the group at the house, got the power to the house secured, apparently there was house wiring on or around us, climbed into the house and started pulling debris away so we could get out. This man subsequently held out gear, picked us up from the hospital after we were released, took us to his home and then brought us to a hotel. I am forever in his debt. The footwell crushed around my legs, but I was able to pull them out on my own only with minor abrasions. My plexiglas windshield was shattered and I have some lacerations on my head and bruising on my right arm. My wife was in the back seat next to our 13 month old son, who was in his car seat. My wife has a fair amount of bruising and soreness. My son has minor rash from his car seat restraints. Fortunately the home was unoccupied. We are very fortunate.
  4. 32 points
    Better than New: The Refurbishment of N205J Mooney N205J is a 1987 M20J model “205 Special Edition (SE)”. It differed from other M20J “201’s” at the time in that it incorporated a few changes: 1. Fully enclosed gear doors 2. Rounded window lines 3. 28 volt electrical system 4. Electric cowl flaps with infinite adjustment 5. Upturned wingtips with forward facing recognition lights and aft facing position lights 6. Gear extension speed increased from 132 to 140 knots The 205 SE came right as the general aviation market was in decline, so only seventy-seven 205 SE’s were built spanning two years. N205J was previously owned by a business associate of ours. N205J was hangar kept most of its life. It had original factory avionics, paint, and interior and was a low time aircraft with only 1885.5 hours. It had Precise Flight Speed Brakes installed. So why did we put so much money into a 1987 Mooney? I am one of the owners of SureFlight Aircraft Completions which specializes in paint, interiors, and avionics. We made it a “project plane”. We worked on it when we had any gaps in our schedule. Now that it is complete, we have a demonstration plane to show and fly customers that showcases SureFlight’s capabilities. It’s an awesome Mooney to fly! First stop was Henry Weber Mooney Authorized Service Center at neighboring KLNS to perform the pre-purchase inspection. The important thing for us was to have a good airframe and engine to start with. We took care of some maintenance on the airframe, overhauled the prop, bought a new governor, put new gear shock discs in, etc. We had them complete an annual at the time as well. We had the engine sent out to Columbia Aircraft Services for an Inspect and Replace as Needed (“IRAN”) which included new Camshaft, Lifters, Bearings and Rings. While it was there, we had the engine converted from the Lycoming IO-360-A3B6D to the IO-360-A3B6 specification to eliminate the D3000 dual magnetos in a single housing, driven by a single driveshaft. The engine now has two separate fully independent Bendix magnetos. We had the cylinders removed to be sent out for nickel plating. After the engine came back, Henry Weber reinstalled it with new Lord mounts and made sure that the engine and engine cowlings were properly aligned. We added GAMIjectors calibrated fuel injection nozzles and then went to work on the full refurbishment of N205J. Avionics: The aircraft was equipped with a factory original avionics suite from 1986, except the addition of an Apollo GPS. It all came out. All the wiring was removed and replaced. A plastic panel is created to make sure everything looks correct before fabricating the metal: Yokes are painted black and a metal panel is installed: And then filled with equipment: · Fully Electronic panel; Eliminated Vacuum System · Garmin G500 flight deck with Synthetic Vision · Garmin GAD 43e autopilot interface for G500 · Garmin GTN 750 GPS/Nav/Comm Navigator with Telligence Voice Control · Garmin GMA 35c Bluetooth enabled remote audio panel · Garmin GTX 345R ADS-B In/Out remote transponder · Garmin GNC 255 Nav/Comm · King KFC-150 autopilot (the only thing that remained from the old panel) · L3 Avionics ESI-500 Standby Instrument with: Altitude, Attitude, Slip/skid, Vertical speed, Aircraft track, Synthetic Vision option, Navigation option. Magnetic heading option. · JP Instruments EDM 930 Primary computer for RPM, Manifold Pressure, Oil, Fuel, Battery, Engine data. · AirGizmos iPad Mini 4 panel dock · Nimbus Aviation Electroluminescent Circuit Breaker overlay. · ACK E-04 GPS Emergency Locator Transmitter · Guardian Aero 451-101 Panel Mount CO Detector · MidContinent MD93 Digital Clock/USB Charger. Paint: We painted a new King Air 300 for the Mayo Clinic earlier in 2016. We loved their colors. We knew that these would be the colors we would eventually use on the Mooney. Stripping: Everything that is not stripped is covered in foil. Windows are removed to be replaced with Great Lakes Aero Windows SC (Solar Control) Grey installed with Extra thick .250” windshield. All flight controls and gear doors are removed to be painted separately, airframe is etched and alodined in preparation for epoxy primer. After primer, an Axalta White Pearl base color is applied. N205J is painted in all Pearlescent paint which requires a clearcoat after each color is applied. This is one of the reasons pearlescent paints cost more. Paint Scheme Layout: Axalta Cumulous Grey Pearl is applied to undercarriage, wheel wells, airframe, and then clearcoated. Axalta Sable Pearl accent stripes are applied and then clearcoated. Final Prep for the Axalta Bright Blue Pearl: After all the pearlescent colors are applied and clearcoated, exterior placarding is applied, and the entire aircraft is re-sanded for a final overall layer of clearcoat. This gives the airplane a wet, glossy look and deepens the color, smooths edge lines between accent stripes, seals the placards, and it also provides a more durable and cleanable finish because you do not cut into the color when polishing. Flight controls are hung and painted separately: Cowlings and access panels are installed with new stainless steel hardware. Flight controls are balanced and then reinstalled. Interior: Unfortunately, we forgot to get some good “before pics” of the interior. It had blue velour seats with aged and yellowing plastic panels. Old seat covers off. Repaint the seat frames. New covers sewn for the new foam buildups. Upholstered seats with custom Mooney Logo headrests. We repaired cracks in several of the plastics, and repainted with a textured paint to hide any old imperfections. We decided against covering the panels in ultra-leather to save weight. We fabricated a hatch behind the hole for the windshield bar that holds the compass for easy R&R of the glare shield. Painted a flat textured black. Looks like new. The interior goes back together with repainted plastics, new carpet, new door seals, and new upholstered seats. After it was all complete, we put the aircraft on scales. The new weight and balance was 17 lbs lighter than before. We also performed the gross weight increase to increase the gross weight from 2,740 to 2,900 giving the aircraft a new useful load of 988 lbs. Mooney N205J – Ready for Takeoff!
  5. 32 points
    It took 3 years and about 70 hours under the hood. On Friday March 10, I passed my instrument check ride! Big day for me. Learned how to fly at 51 and now 56. Glad to have done it in my mooney. Got kicked around a lot on Friday with the wind up here in the Midwest.
  6. 28 points
    And in case you're wondering... Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
  7. 27 points
    I started the day as a VFR pilot and ended the day as an Instrument rated pilot. Today was IFR check ride day. I have to say that this journey has probably been one of the hardest things I have ever done. I am proud of myself, and yet keenly aware of missing my Mom and Dad who would have been beaming. I was raised with no limits. They taught me that I would do anything I put my mind to. I want to thank those of you who have taught me, supported me, challenged me and loved me through all this. I decided to take a sunset flight as a treat after the ride. Life is so good. #IFRMooneyGirl
  8. 27 points
    After lurking these forums and bugging many members for two years I finally got my first plane back home. My wife and I were super happy after the trip, it's a lot of fun to really be crusing across the ground and having the capability of a real cross country Thanks for all the help, especially from MB65E!
  9. 27 points
    One of the reasons I decided to put my Acclaim up for sale a couple weeks ago is that my wife won't fly with me any more here in the Rockies. Too much turbulence for her taste. Well, 3 days after listing it for sale my name came up on the waiting list for a hangar in Petaluma, CA (O69). Wasn't expecting that! Petaluma is near my second home in Marin County, CA. My wife loves flying on the west coast. Much smoother air, much shorter flights to get to interesting places. So, after a few days of deliberation, I decided to take my Acclaim off the market and relocate it to Petaluma. Pretty darn excited about it!
  10. 26 points
    I was the pilot. My passenger was a 2016 graduate of the same university/fraternity. If I’d had a chute I would have pulled it (we were ~1800’ AGL descending into KBUR when we lost the engine). My primary concern was my passenger and those on the ground. I looked for the darkest side street I could find (10pm in Glendale on a Friday night, the major roads were clogged with traffic). I just flew her until I couldn’t. In maneuvering to avoid an apartment building I (think I) stall/spinned her into a tree. That Mooney fuselage protected us very well. She wasn’t perfect, but she was solid. I’ve had her 4 months and flown her 65 hours (she was down for ~10 weeks getting avionics work done, which I knew when I bought her would be required), everything from pattern practice at Chino to 12K IFR trips to Utah and Arizona. Two A&Ps have worked on her. I’ll advise when I know more about what happened last night. All I do know is, as far as I know I kept in control of the plane as much as possible, and whatever skill I have as a pilot was heavily augmented by luck (no damage to property on the ground, no injuries). Now I’m sore, stiff, exhausted, and bowing out for at least a little while. I do believe I’ll have another Mooney someday though.
  11. 25 points
    I just got the news. My son Nathan just passed his private check ride. I've already got my insurance agent working to add him to my policy and find out what hoops he'll have to go through before he can fly the family plane. He wants to go all the way to professional pilot. I think he'll help make sure my M20E gets enough time in the air. Too bad the engine wasn't rated for 201 HP. Flying is more fun if you have someone to share it with.
  12. 25 points
    My beautiful Mooney and I made the cover of MAPA Log this month! My thanks to Trey Hughes, et. al, for the honor!
  13. 24 points
  14. 24 points
    We need to publicly acknowledge, and let Mike Elliott, the Mooney Summit folks, and the Bill Gilliland Foundation folks know that we appreciate them. Their efforts to reduce the heartache and pain associated with the loss of life in Mooney accidents is unbelievably generous, and I suspect greatly appreciated by the families of the victims.
  15. 24 points
    I don't think I've said it before, but I really want to just thank everyone in this group. You have all been a fantastic inspiration and sort of like family. I know some of us get in heated debates, whether it's about tires, LOP, or whatever but all-in-all, this forum has been an immense part of my ownership experience. Many of you have made contact with me via PMs, Facebook, texting and calling and many of you have been an immense help to rectifying problems, offering services, ideas, and sending me unwanted items I've had since joining the Mooney family. Being a young owner I really don't have the excess funds to chip in with the multitude of flying groups I'm in, but MooneySpace and the Mooney Caravan/foundation are two I am happy to at least donate a few dollars to even remotely try and pay back how much of a resource it's been to me. I hope to one day be able to spill some knowledge I've learned to newer members. This forum is invaluable and its member's nothing short of a family. Again, just wanted again to give warm-hearted thanks to you guys. And let's all keep the discussions civil because I might have more questions on tires soon
  16. 24 points
    I'm late to the discussion, as I've been working. But I thought maybe I could throw in my 2 cents. Just as a point of reference, I just went over 20,000 total time, I'm type rated in the 727, L1011, 737, 757, 767, DC9/MD88, and the A319/320/321. Over 2000 hours in the F-15, 1200 in the T-37, and a master instructor in the USAF. USAF Flight Examiner, Designated FAA Examiner and Line Check Airman. I was an accident investigator for over 20 years, both military and civilian, and participated in over 2 dozen major mishaps with many fatalities. The things I know for a fact: I could have done what the OP did. NO ONE expects bad stuff to happen, and when it does, it catches you by surprise, as we all think we've planned and thought ahead. The ONE thing we've missed is the thing that happens. It takes a HUGE amount of guts to admit a mistake. I've learned more than I already knew by reading this thread. I truly respect the OP for coming on here and teaching me something. No matter how smart I am, I guarantee there is much I don't know, and more that I have to learn. Hopefully any time someone makes a mistake, they'll come on here and help me to avoid the same mistake. @carusoam Your post was extremely helpful to me, thanks for that. @kelty Good luck to you in the future, and thanks for sharing your experience. The Navy used to publish a series called "Grandpa Pettibone" wherein aviators shared their mistakes and mishaps. I think I learned as much from that as any other source. Your willingness to come on here, and do just that honors the service.
  17. 23 points
    After a 15 year hiatus from flying I jumped back into it with both feet. 2 months ago I purchased my M20F and since my timing is always impeccable I have been trying to get through my BFR and transition time while dealing with the spring weather patterns and my work schedule. I finished up on Sunday April 30 flying around in unsettled skies with rain and even a few ice crystals thrown in. The only upside was that afterwards I had a new scratch in my log book letting me know that I was now on my own. Yesterday the weather and work patterns intersected again and I headed out to the airport. After a careful preflight I was sitting out on the run up area talking myself through all of the checklists and getting ready to go when a thought occurred to me. I said to myself "Holy crap you are alone in this thing. Don't do anything on this flight that will make the news." I flew around in my Mooney for 2 wonderful hours with no particular direction other than whimsy with just me to keep myself company. The flight was uneventful and memorable at the same time. I hope I never get to the point in my flying where I lose the feeling of awe while cruising around alone in the sky.
  18. 23 points
  19. 23 points
    To all of my friends here on Mooneyspace, I'd like to offer my sincere appologies for my part in the turn of the "Fatalities" thread started by Amillet. We should be taking lessons from this tragedy, which is how it started out. Instead it has turned into a pissing contest about who can read the regs better for which I'm truly embarrassed. I've asked the moderators to delete the thread in its entrirety, I hope they will. Regards, Clarence
  20. 22 points
    It was long overdue, but I finally got my instrument rating yesterday. I had a flight scheduled for this morning for business. Without the rating, the flight would have been scrapped and I would have spent 8+ hours in the car today. With the rating, off we go. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  21. 21 points
    August 2016 I was delivering my Mooney M20c to my mechanic, Bobby Norman, at the Parr airport (42I) in Zanesville Ohio. I had interaction with Bobby years ago, and he came highly recommended by a number of local Mooney owners. I had thought the field was about 2300 feet (wrong, more on that later) so coming in over the trees I pulled the power to idle, put it in a forward slip and came down. 75mph over the numbers, flared and BANG!. Hardest landing I'd ever done in anything. At the top of the bounce I had a choice, and decided to ride it out. I was uncomfortable trying to go around at a short strip in that predicament. The aircraft bounced a couple more times and stopped, and I taxied back. I had struck the prop in that landing, quite badly. The prop was bent asymmetrically, and the craskshaft busted. I hit hard enough that the force went through the gear into the Johnson bar, wrecking the mechanism that holds it in place (Bobby only figured that part out when he started taxiing. He said it was quite exciting). It took 9 months for the tear down, prop repair, and everything else. The engine repairs were done by a very reputable shop, and the aircraft is now back in service. I just did the first oil change after the teardown. I would have overhauled the engine at this juncture, but it only had 700 hours, and I didn't have the money. What I did wrong: The first thing is entirely insidious. I should have checked the length of the field, since it is now a very comfortable 3k feet. Why didn't I? Because the last time I was there it was 2300 feet! Hardest thing in the world is to override personal experience, but sometimes we really have to. Of course, the other big thing was pulling the power over the trees. Once I got into the runway environment the aircraft didn't have the energy to overcome the sink. Why pull power? Normally in this situation I maintain 12-13" manifold pressure, and use a forward slip. Indeed, most of my landings done this way are well within 2K feet. So why did I change? Worry about a field that I thought (incorrectly) was short. Even if it was 2300, I could have landed the Mooney in it just following my normal procedures. Talk about rubbing salt in the wound. What I did right: riding it out and letting it settle turned out to be the perfect move. I had an asymmetric prop, a badly damaged engine, and I was at a somewhat short and very narrow strip surrounded by hills and mountains. I don't know what would have happened had I put in the power, but it wouldn't have been good. Sometimes its just better not to add extra energy to a bad situation. Perhaps if you don't you'll prang the airplane, but if you do you get to be the one pranged. I recall a fatal TBM accident nearly identical to mine, the aircraft landed hard and struck the prop. The only difference is that guy put in the power at the top of the bounce, and now he's dead. I can't put into words what this did to me. If you noticed me gone for an extended period, its because I couldn't show my face after this. I think one thing might give you an idea, today is the first day I'm thinking I'll actually stick with this aviation thing. I've sort of been on the fence thinking about bailing for the last year. With any luck this will help someone not make the mistake I did. At least it had one silver lining. Hopefully I'll never say I landed worse.
  22. 21 points
    During the Mooney Summit V meeting in Panama City Beach, Mike Elliott was awarded the 2017 FAA safety team representative of the year for his outstanding and continuous support of aviation safety by the FAA administrations Alabama Northwest Florida Flight Standards District Office. A big congrats goes to Mike and all the effort he puts into making the Mooney Summit meeting not only entertaining and fun but placing great emphasis on putting safety first on all our Mooney pilots.
  23. 21 points
    Purchased this 67F model just over 2 months ago. Could not be happier! Have a few trips planned in the near future. We are based in Winchester VA OKV. This board is such a wealth of good information. I hope to be able to contribute.
  24. 21 points
    It flew today... Unfortunately I'm in Kenya but @bucko and @"Chocks" were able to fly it to KELA to finish the tank job that started this entire saga. Here's a few pics.
  25. 21 points
    Has anyone else done something so stupid in an airplane that you reflect upon your ignorance and shake your head? Anything that you have done that you are ashamed of? Anything that blind confidence and that little voice that should be telling you "NO"! Was silent? I did. To this day I think back and just shake my head. Me a Certified Safety Professional doing the unthinkable. What was it? When was it? Where was it? Why "out" yourself now? Why not just leave it buried in the past as a bullet dodged?. As a life lesson learned. The great thread discussing "how you got into a Mooney" made me think back 15 years ago. A 40 year old pilot with <100 hours total time decided he needed a Mooney. He found one and after giving his wife an ultimatum of "I am buying an airplane you can either get on board or do what you need to do"...(Really?...Wow. That shows the mission desire was strong). This to a woman that had hung around with me for nearly 20 years and had provided two beautiful children... So, plane was located in Ocala, FL. A 1966 Mooney that the owner was looking to sell after owning for nearly 35 years...He even mailed photos (snail mail only way back then)...Photos in his attached hanger to his home. A price was agreed upon if it "checked out". Check out consisted of a flight around the pattern and a $700 annual. The location was Brunswick, GA. A one way ticket was purchased by the idiot author. Kind of like Cortez burning his soldiers ships...Only way home was "victory"(purchase)... It is December 2002 and the broker picks me up at the airport. The plane arrives the next day flown by a "rental pilot". He and I went up. I had ZERO TIME IN TYPE. I had read a lot about Vintage Mooney's. I showed "the pilot" what the disconnect was for the PC. "I thought it just flew heavy on controls"...Nope, that is the P.C. Swung my first J-Bar on several landings. (Didn't notice that the DG (the olde revolving mini gauge was out of commission. Whiskey compass was leaking too. No worries, I had a automobile Garmin GPS (Really?) Annual did not show what logs did that the accessories were original to 1966. The 1970's overhaul was really an AD for the CamShaft to be inspected...I was to impressed by the recovered seats...The Touch-Up paint job (on original scheme), the speed slope windshield and cowl closure mod to know what was REALLY important. The panel? Shotgun with no engine monitor. No shoulder belts. Original six pack engine gauges. The plane had been flow a total of 15 hours in last 15 years. The definition of a hanger queen... The annual (with an extra cost oil change) completed and "no discrepancies found" resulted in the deal being done. Even got a free seafood dinner from the broker...Next morning the transfer of funds was delayed and I didn't launch until 11AM. I taxied out and run-up showed a mag drop that was not acceptable. Taxied back to ramp and shut down. Was told that it just needs a good hard run-up. So I did...and all was well...(Right). Launched into a headwind (due to a frontal boundary that stretched from Gulf to Canada) and climbed....and climbed...and climbed. Broken up to 10000. So 10000 was where I leveled off. My groundspeed? 105knots. Flew northwest and a solid layer developed. ( I was NOT instrument rated) and had zero clue what weather was ahead. Got North of Atlanta and found an opening. No idea (beyond auto GPS) where I was as I was high above cloud layer. Fuel getting low...Break in clouds. Dive down through and "there is an airport". SEVERE crosswind on landing. Fueled plane. Checked weather. Launched. Again climb up to 10000. Pushed up to 10500. Saw a Learjet Go across from East to west at my altitude...Gulp. It is December. Gettting back to Iowa is NOT GOING TO HAPPEN. It is getting dark. I get another opening with Evansville, IN and Kentucky showing on GPS. I let down. I see a wall of snow to the north. I look to my right and there are the runway lights for Evansville. I contact tower using sectional for freq and make an uneventful landing. The FBO was fantastic asking me if I need fuel? Yes. Do I plan to spend the night? YES! Do I need a ride to a motel? Yes. Would I like to drive through McDonald's and get some food? Yes? What time would you like me to pick you up tomorrow? 7:30? See you then. The front went through and the Mooney flew like a Mooney over blue skies for remainder of flight. So many stupid things that could/should have killed me on that ignorant "Get there itis" half assed, under trained/equipped maiden voyage in a plane that had NOT BEEN FLOWN...Much less flown for the first time by a Mooney driver. Would insurance have paid off for my poor wife when I angered in? Getting Mooney Specific training and a PreBuy by a Mooney Saavy entity...Walking away...Reviewing logs. Knowing how to review logs. Not being an overconfident idiot. It was not my time to die. Never Again. Fly Safe.
  26. 21 points
  27. 21 points
    Here are the facts: a] I am the "supreme leader" of this website if that means I am the only one answering the dozens of emails and reports per day and trying to keep the peace and paying the bills to keep it online and software-current. I decide what stays and what goes and *you* decide whether you want to stay or go. I have been running forum websites for 15+ years and I know when s**t is doing downhill. b] Truth is on an average day I might get 1-2 reports on topics. When the United topics were live I was getting 10-15. I don't have time or the resources to deal with it. I have done this to countless other topics on this forum through the years. c] I only have one person that seems to care about me locking these topics up (I don't need to mention names) and I have had dozens of "likes" on the lock posts and many other emails from members thanking me and/or asking me to lock new posts being made on the same topic. I believe that my actions were doing what the majority of the community wanted. Again I only have just one person that seems to be upset about locking the topics and a whole lot of others begging and thanking me for doing so.
  28. 21 points
    Sorry for the retread from last year, but I didn't have time to photoshop another Mooney in flight over a winter scene. The feelings are unchanged.
  29. 20 points
    I needed something to go over the expresso bar in the house. Saw something similar to this on the internet and decided to drag out the raspberry pi and some LEDs and make one for myself. I used PHP to grab the current metar every 15 minutes and updates the LED colors via Python. Used LED string individually addressable RGB lights. its about 30x20 inches. I used a digital sectional of LA and added an inset of the Bay area since I fly up to WVI pretty often. The code turned out to be the easy part. Glueing and splicing all those dang LEDs was why it sat on the living room floor for a month. Finally pinched myself in the ass and finished it up today. it shows green/blue/purple/red for the flight conditions.
  30. 20 points
    Just to let you know, there's a couple of us Mooney folks here in Santa Rosa. We have all had a horrific week in Sonoma County. The unthinkable happened in the early hours of Monday evening as a firestorm sped from Calistoga over the mountain into the heart of northern Santa Rosa. My wife and I were awakened by a neighbor for an immediate evacuation with a firestorm raging on the hill just above our neighborhood. The smoke, flames, explosions, severe wind and the roar were unbelievable and what I would describe as evil. My wife was injured trying to wake an elderly neighbor and required an ER visit but our hospital seemed to be on fire as did all of Santa Rosa. We left with the clothes on our back and our cat. We were certain we would lose our house. As we became refugees our day was filled with anxiety as we grasped the reality of losing "our stuff." Remembering that I had webcams it was late morning when I saw that, unbelievably, our home had been somehow spared. We actually felt guilty about that as so many of our friends narrowly escaped with just their lives in Fountain Grove, Coffey Park, and Larkfield/Wikiup where we live. One of our Mooney brothers, M20D6607U, lost his home as did many members of his family. So many families had multiple members in these neighborhoods. You would think when something like this happens you could stay with relatives but when every family member loses their home it creates a real dilemma. I am helping to run an evacuation and disaster relief distribution center and I connected with Ron personally today, getting him and his family some relief supplies, loading him up with everything I could from sleeping bags to Gatorade to toothbrushes and socks. He also knows and is helping several other families who lost their homes and we are supplying them as well. I know he's going to be upset with me for telling you all this but I thought it would be great if you left him some words of encouragement. I'm not sure when he'll see this but at some point I'll tell him what I did unless he busts me sooner. He's a great guy with a heart of gold. All of our Mooneys are safe. The airport was about 2 miles from the fire and has been a base for Cal Fire, National Guard, and several GA relief efforts as have the smaller airports near us like Healdsburg, Cloverdale, and Petaluma. There is a sizable TFR overhead of which a small chunk was left open for KSTS in case you're flying in here. When faced with the possibility of losing your home and everything in it, you often wonder what you would take with you. When the evacuation is immediate and dangerous there is no time or decision making. You leave it all. We snuck in past the barricades the second day as the fires were still raging next to us, expecting our home to be destroyed. My wife and I looked around and wondered what we'd pack into our van. All we took were our important papers, old video tape of our daughters, and a couple extra changes of clothing. We left everything else. The night before, when we were convinced we lost everything, we let it all go. It was just stuff at that point. We had each other, our friends, and we were safe. What we used to think was so important now made us feel embarrassed. The new sofa we took so long to find, the perfect giant HDTV, the piano, and on and on and on. It was just stuff. It wasn't important anymore and it seemed a hinderance. On this second trip in all we brought out was a laundry basket with very few things. The van was empty as we headed back to the shelter and we walked away from our home with no regrets. Lean-of-peak vs. rich-of-peak didn't matter anymore (hahaha). Neither did politics, sports, or any other argument or opinion. It all seems so petty now. I drive through the burn area on my way to work every day. There's no way around it. The familiar landmarks that defined my neighborhood are gone, obliterated. I'm hoping that visible scar on our community will be a constant reminder to not get caught up in the "stuff" trap again. Family and friendships are what's important. Giving to others and serving your community, being generous and grateful and all that good stuff, that's what's important. -Scott
  31. 20 points
    I have had a few people ask me and yes, I plan to keep flying GA. My wife is very forgiving and understanding. Plus she really enjoys flying and was super excited to have a plane of our own as we had talked about it for years. Right now I will let the insurance settle out and get everything sorted. We also discussed that from now on I will conduct a full brief with her on the plan just as if she was my co-pilot or wingman on a military flight. That way she will know if I'm doing something different and make me justify it. This is our way to mitigate this type of issue from happening again.
  32. 20 points
    Last thing he needs is a lecture from you , Respectfully , if we treat people this way , don't expect others to be so forth-coming in the future....
  33. 20 points
    Everyone, The folks at Sensorcon are willing to pass along a 20% discount to pilots on all of their products. At checkout use the code below. http://sensorcon.com/collections/carbon-monoxide-meters Discount code: aircraft2017 I'm going with the "industrial" and am going to add the Pump kit. I like the vibrating alarm and the pump kit will help with troubleshooting various applications(home, aviation, boating, etc.) In my opinion, every A&P should have one in the tool box. They do recommend a calibration every 6 months. If no calibration is done they have a tendency to wander in accuracy. But only about +-2ppm. Even if you never calibrate, they will be infinitely better than the home detectors. Sensorcon said with regular calibration they are seeing some that are 5 years old that still operate properly. I think in a cockpit environment a once a year calibration is reasonable. Sensorcon may work with us on a lower calibration price also. One can calibrate on your own but would need the equipment. It might make sense to do a group buy on calibration equipment. I'll look into that down the road If you don't have good CO Detection please consider adding a high quality detector. These Sensorcon Units are a good, cost effective option. I lived though my CO poisoning experience, but I shouldn't have. These things could/will save lives. Also, feel free to share this discount code with others. I also ask that if you ever discover a CO problem down the road with a detector, share it with everyone. Online forums, airport lounges, family get togethers, etc. Lets keep the discussion going. Cheers, Dan
  34. 20 points
    I was called a couple months ago by a teacher friend who was hosting a "Project Based Learning Program" with the theme being "Aviation" for her 8th graders. She wanted to know if she could culminate the program with a visit to my hangar and share some details about my newly completed project. I said sure and also offered to come in one day for a classroom session as well. I visited her school last week and spoke with the two classes conducting the program (28 kids per class). Today they visited my airport via school bus, with each class spending about 45 minutes of the field trip in my hangar. I let every kid sit in the plane and reviewed flight control functions (they got to operate the joysticks while watching the reaction out on the aircraft), engine control levers, and I let them play with my touch screen Garmin G3X's. They loved the "Apple" type technology on the touch screens, squeezing the zoom features of the maps in and out. On my way in this morning, I stopped by to see Ivan, the manager of our local Fed-Ex air operations support company, CSA Air, hoping he could provide his Piper Cub for viewing by the kids while they were there (to contrast composite construction, Steve's Mooney made with aluminum, and fabric construction of the cub). Unfortunately, it was in the local FBO for it's annual, but after some discussion I invited him over to offer a short "Career Talk" near the end of each visit. He has over 30 pilots on staff, and 28 Cessna Caravans, as well as running the main repair facility for most planes north of Milwaukee. His presentation went over great, as he has flown for the majors, worked as an A&P / IA, flown cargo and managed several aviation organizations. We especially encouraged the girls that this opportunity is NOT gender specific, with each of us citing examples of successful woman we personally know in aviation. To finish each session, we pulled the plane out, with the teacher and I selecting the 3 most engaged students of each session to sit in the plane, and I did an engine start (jet engines sound SOOOOO COOL when they spool up). As the bus was leaving with the kids, Ivan and I pondered if we may have planted the aviation bug in one or two of those kids today. Clearly that was our ulterior motive! Tom Note; That would be my gray and aging mug in the second picture, Ivan can be seen through the back window in the coed shot.
  35. 20 points
    Hello all, I hope you had a fantastic holiday for those celebrating! Just a heads up that if you did not notice I have upgraded the community to run on secure SSL as you will see by the https:// in the address bar (versus the standard http://). This was done for better safety for you folks. Now when you login your username and passwords will not be openly transmitted over the Internet and instead will be encrypted. Thanks as always for your support of this great community! Craig
  36. 19 points
    So I finally did it! I am now the proud owner of a 1982 Mooney 201. After renting and club memberships for almost 30 years I finally own my own plane. Now I only have to share with my kids. I haven't flown a Mooney in over 10 years, but it was just like riding a bike. I had a local CFI go up with me for the first couple landings to make sure I didn't do something stupid, but instead I had some of the nicest landing ever. Who say's Mooneys are hard to land. Here's to a long and happy future together.
  37. 19 points
    Let's mark this momentous event with photos of our Mooney!!
  38. 19 points
    Installed the finished cowling today. Propeller balance tomorrow with final work on Friday to have it ready for a test flight and customer pickup on Saturday. I have to say that I like it. Here's a couple of before and after photos.
  39. 19 points
    Hello All, I'm really too gutted to write anything of substance at the moment, but I wanted to share a few pictures of my father, the first one of him sitting in his Mooney Mite sometime between '69 and '71, when he owned the Mite. We laid him to rest yesterday far ahead of when it should have been. For the past two years he'd battled a brain injury from a freak accident. I had been searching for a Mooney when the accident occurred. He and I had been talking multiple times a week, planning all the trips we'd take, including Oshkosh. After the accident I could no longer call him and to visit meant a 5 hour drive, which I did many times until I found the Mooney. That helped shorten that trip to 1.5 hours which meant I could see him more frequently. He was so thrilled to hear of the plane and tried his best to overcome his challenges so he could go flying. It just wasn't meant to be. However, trying to make the most of the situation and give him some good days back, I managed, with the help of some good friends, to take a field trip away from the facility he was in and get him into my E this past November for a flight. He had a great day. To the staff at the facility, or anyone that visited, he talked about it for weeks and weeks afterwards. Throughout his life, he was so humble, quiet and kind. And so incredible. He did so much for me, I could never repay. Although he was a home builder by trade, his love of aviation was immense. He owned an Aeronca and a Mooney Mite, built a Rotorway Scorpion Too (II) in our garage when I was a kid, and was a Hot Air Balloon pilot flying second balloon for two of his friends businesses (I chased as a new teenage driver). He earned his Private, Instrument, Multi, Commercial and was hired by Eastern Airlines two seconds before they put a freeze on the incoming hires and it never materialized after that. He had a host of other incredible hobbies too, but this is an aviation forum and I've gone on long enough. Thanks Dad for, everything. Everything! Thanks MS'ers for letting me share this.
  40. 19 points
    I have received a plethora of goodwill messages from people on here, checking that i am safe. It is very heartwarming to receive such things and that people care so much. I thought I had better post that yes Andrew and I are safe. We were travelling up from Cornwall at the time of the attack and so were well out of the way when it all happened. Thank you all for your messages. Andrew
  41. 19 points
    It's been a long search, but it patience has paid off. Thanks to all for the info and encouragement shared on this site.
  42. 18 points
    Hello folks, After much planning and some shopping around I bought a nice 74 Executive a week and a half ago. We bought it from a gentleman in Colorado Springs and flew it hope to Dayton over two days taking the opportunity to do some sight seeing along the way. It was like a mini vacation and we started to get to know the airplane. It is pretty amazing. When I was doing my research I was looking at speed numbers, weights, fuel capacity, range and things like that. Now that I am starting to plan and execute flights the capability of this plane is just fantastic. I just transitioned from a Cessna 175 which was a pretty good traveler but this Mooney is great! It feels good that my research paid off. I have a fully IFR outfitted traveling machine that makes good time and uses relatively little fuel to do it. I'm excited! Gerbil
  43. 18 points
    Had an interesting bit of IFR flying today in actual. Coming to Butler, KBTP, the AWOS was reporting 800 overcast. The GPS runway 26 approach (which the wind was favoring) was good down to 600-1. Great. I shoot the approach and can't see a break in the clouds down at 600. I hold the altitude till the end and go missed. On the missed, I listen to the AWOS and now it's reporting 400. Approach asks me to say my intentions so with the wind being only about 4kts down 26, I said I'll try the ILS going the other way. The ILS is good to 300-1. With 400 overcast, that should be ok as well. I shoot the approach and down to the DA, I've got nothing. I figured even if it's slightly below minimums, if I could just make out the rails, I could get an extra hundred. Neither the ground nor the runway lights, I go missed again. Now the AWOS reports 200 overcast! ATC asks my intentions and I said I'll fly the published missed and hold till the weather improves. After about 15 minutes of holding, I was getting pretty tired so I figured I'll give it another shot and go somewhere else and take a break before coming back if it doesn't work out. It was reporting 400 so I had a shot. I fly the approach and as I cross the FAF, the AWOS goes back too reporting 200! I thought of cancelling the approach but figured, heck, I can use the practice so why not? I fly the approach right on the ball. I broke out at about 400ft, just a little above minimums and spotted the runway. Something was odd though, the runway lights were not on. I didn't need them this time because I broke out, but they could have made it work last time. I clicked the mic a bunch of times and then they came on! Doh! For some reason, it just didn't occur to me to activate the runway lights in daytime. Usually if I fly an ILS, it's either at a towered airport or at night and I know to click for lights. Butler is uncontrolled and it just didn't dawn on me to turn them on in day time. Nothing unsafe, I held to minimums and went missed the other times but dang those lights might have helped. On a 2 hour flight, I ended up spending an entire hour shooting 3 approaches to minimums and holding. I ended up being more exhausted from that last hour than I was from the other 4 hours of xcountry flying all day. I can fly to Florida on a nice day and be less worked than an hour of hard IFR. Instead of picking up my passenger and going right away, I took an hour break and got food before getting back in the plane. So two things I learned were give the mic a bunch of clicks when shooting an approach and the weather can go up and down quickly in screwy ways. The only way to know if you can really make it in or not is to give it a try (as long as you can honestly hold to minimums and go no further unless you have it).
  44. 18 points
    So not a flight but a text from my daughter at 14:00 today. "So It would appear im a doctor". She has passed finals. One seriously proud Dad here. Had to share.
  45. 18 points
    Today (and everyday) we remember, and thank the men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to our country. Whether on land, by sea or in the air, we honor all for your sacrifice, so that we may continue to enjoy our freedom. Freedom is not free. Let's not forget.
  46. 18 points
    Finally, pictures! My wife and kids were dying to see it, so we drive over to DVT. It was an adventure just getting through the to the ramp. DVT is very definitely run by a government bureaucracy. They all wanted to go for a ride, but I can't really fly it yet. I mean, I could legally, but if something went wrong... So, I just gave them a ride to the fuel pumps lol. Surprisingly, my kids said the backseat felt pretty roomy! We'll see how they feel after a couple hours back there...
  47. 18 points
    When I lived in Denver my neighbors across the street told me their father (wife's) used to own a Mooney. She said he loved his plane. He had lost his medical from heart problems about 10 years prior and hadn't flown sense. He came to visit one day and they interoduced him to me and said I had a Mooney. I asked him if he wanted to go for a ride and he gladly accepted. The next morning we met at the airport and after preflighting the plane I showed him the door and asked if he wanted the left seat! His eyes got big as saucers and he jumped right in. I said "why don't you fly me to Leadville?" And handed him a sectional. He said Ok, put on my headsets like he had flown yesterday and started it right up. He flew the plane expertly including all the radio calls. When we got to Leadville he got the certificate, we got some lunch in town and he flew me back. He was a crotchety old guy and my neighbor said that he was never happy, but for the rest of his stay she couldn't pry the smile off of his face. He died one month later of the heart condition that grounded him. So, the only thing better than giving someone their first Mooney ride is giving someone their last Mooney ride.
  48. 18 points
    I just received the e-mail I was waiting on that my Field approval will be approved by the end of this month. Now the real transformation begins. David
  49. 18 points
    Remember the first post in this thread. Not anymore
  50. 18 points
    Santa came early this year!! Closed on it Friday and the previous owner flew it out here to me in CA today. Some of you probably recognize it from a for sale thread here on MS. They are finishing up clearing out the hangar and then will be putting a fresh coat of epoxy on the floor. Hope to have her moved into her new home by Tue-Wed. It was a fun adventure searching for a plane and the whole process of purchasing this plane was a pleasure. The seller is a fantastic guy. I'll get a fun write up of the whole journey on my blog later this week but I had to come here and share the good news. Oh, any of you out at KAJO (I saw a few others on the ramp) I'd love to say hi and meet sometime.