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Showing most liked content on 09/21/2017 in all areas

  1. 5 points
  2. 2 points
    I know that as a student pilot we did touch and goes all of the time. As a grown up, though, all of my training has been to not touch anything until off the runway and stopped. I don't remember a touch and go exception to that guidance. So I decline to do them any more. I really don't care what anyone else does, though, and don't really care about the insurance argument either. If T&Gs were an undue risk the insurance companies would be the first to exclude them.
  3. 1 point
    On a normally aspirated engine, wide open throttle with the prop all the way forward until cruising altitude. And using target EGT leaning all the way to cruise.
  4. 1 point
    P08 is my preferred stop for Jet A and 100LL thru PHX. Casa grand is good too, but Gila Bend? Yikes. -Matt
  5. 1 point
    I have the 440 with a GTx 330ES. I already had the 330 so just had to send to Garmin for a simple upgrade. If I were to start from scratch I would do the Lynx. If I were to do it again I would do the Lynx. (The shop still doesn't have my Avidyne ADSB In working with my Avidyne GPS)
  6. 1 point
    Apparently test pilots are above proper flight planning. How do you land at a fuel stop that does not have fuel for your plane? Seems a simple phone call would have saved the embarrassment of filling your new prototype with diesel out of a 5 gal gas can and a makeshift funnel. The first day of the ferry of the M10 POC from the R&D facility in Chino to the production facility in Kerville Texas. The plan was for "Wild" Bill Colvin, Kevin Kammer, and Elliot Seguin to stop for gas in Gila Bend. Unfortunately while Gila had plenty of 100LL there was no Jet A. So the team got some diesel (certified in the continental CD-155) from a passerby and jumped over to Casa Grande for the rest of the fuel load. ... Arriving in Deming not only was there a totally rad airport car (err van), but line guy Tony suggested the Adobe Deli for dinner. Which ended up being a great way to wait out the thunderstorms that were popping up in all quadrants. The first day of the ferry of the M10 POC from the R&D facility in Chino to the production facility in Kerville Texas. The plan was for "Wild" Bill Colvin, Kevin Kammer, and Elliot Seguin to stop for gas in Gila Bend. Unfortunately while Gila had plenty of 100LL there was no Jet A. So the team got some diesel (certified in the continental CD-155) from a passerby and jumped over to Casa Grande for the rest of the fuel load. Arriving in Deming not only was there a totally rad airport car (err van), but line guy Tony suggested the Adobe Deli for dinner. Which ended up being a great way to wait out the thunderstorms that were popping up in all quadrants.
  7. 1 point
    So we're at 15 AMU to buy a wing from LASAR, 4-5 to deliver it and almost 20 more for labor. That's about the same as a factory overhaul with R&R, and less than half the cost just to buy a new wing from Mooney. And should be well below your insurance limits, even the ~70% where they call it a total.
  8. 1 point
    Have to agree with @bluehighwayflyer.The 530 is showing 150 kts. across the ground at 6,500' with 9.2 GPH @ 69% HP. That sounds about right, but that ASI almost seems to be showing TAS, which is fairly unlikely.
  9. 1 point
    Stripped my wheel wells on my current Mooney by conventional means over 13 years ago with no issues. Just throughly flush (several) times once done. Done many planes this way.
  10. 1 point
    All this talk of undue risk is a bit of a straw man. Every time we take the plane out of the hangar we are taking a risk that doesn't need to be taken. Other than a few hijackings nobody ever forced anybody to fly anywhere. Most professional pilots fly in conditions that they would probably prefer not to fly in, but they do it anyway because that is their job. When I flew the Mooney every day (20 years). You look forward to things unusual like a touch and go because the normal day to day flying can get very boring.
  11. 1 point
    I got estimates of just under $2 per mile. I was told the tanks were good, but there really isn't any way for anyone to know until they are tested. Of course all off this was before the change of ownership of LASAR.
  12. 1 point
    Your engine parameters all look great but at first glance indicating 175 MPH at 6,500' while burning 9.2 GPH seems suspect to me. I wonder about the accuracy of your air speed indicator?
  13. 1 point
    This weekend I managed to get four cross country's in with just about 6 hours of flying. Flew up to Auburn Washington Saturday for a FATPNW fly in. It was great times other than the smoke... It was a short five miles visibility getting in and out and under the class Bravo. I was above 10,500 to get out of the smoke on the way there and home. What was really crazy there was so much traffic flying up there in that stuff. Those pilots are crazy or dedicated... I have an oil change planned in two hours and will be replacing my air filter because of the ash. Sunday I took a friend and my girlfriend up to Pendleton for dinner and a little bit of gambling at WildHorse. It was kind of a cluster relaying on the casino picking us up and taking us back. The smoke was really setting in and there was a few rain cells moving in as well. After I did the preflight it was clear it would be night time when we got to John Day. I'm night current but this would be the first time I've landed with passengers. I told them because of the weather and added stress I was going to isolate them on the audio panel. Over the last month I've been doing a lot of flying dealing with low visibility due to forest fire smoke and getting some hood time in preparation to starting my ifr training. I was very glad I had for this flight home. We had to dodge a few rain cells and went threw one or two as well. I kept my instrument scan, with looking outside and when it came to it I made one of my best landing yet. I have spent this whole week briefing myself and how I handled it since I learned more on that flight than I have in a long time. I was able to keep my bearing and the little bit of radio work you have to while on flight following. But I feel I've moved my minimums and safety margins enough that I feel confident to start ifr training in my plane. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  14. 1 point
    So ... The Mooney is as put together as she's going to be for right now. The stormscope (WX-1000) works. The autopilot (S-Tec 30) works and is connected to track VOR/LOC or GPS (deviation only, not GPSS); Tucson Aero performed an internal repair on the S-Tec computer (a plastic universal joint was bad; $70 fix). The Garmin SL30 (sourced from a MooneySpacer) works great, and my non-standard install (DB25 pass through in line between the PM2000 intercom and existing headset etc. wiring, with milspec multiconnector wiring split off to patch in the SL30; no audio panel, for now, though I have a GMA340 ready for install‡) is signed off and blessed. Weight and balance was updated. The to/from flag assembly on the well-used IND-351 I also got off a MooneySpacer (for pennies) had failed*, and TA wouldn't work on the old plastic Collins stuff; PSI would ($700 at the top end) but between that and the new hole they were going to have to put in the panel for a back course annunciator light to be fully IFR legal wasn't worth it to me; I sourced a pristine MD-200-306 on eBay for $1300 (mid-range for what they're going for, and well under what Wentworth is quoting for a used unit). The repaired GX55 is still working great, and as long as the track doesn't change more than 10° or so at any given waypoint, I can fly long distances without touching the controls. Next up will be a panel redo with engine monitor, and probably Garmin G5s (though that might wait for the GPS install). But the immediate need is a blind encoder. I keep losing my Mode C (but not the Mode A component) on my transponder, a new-to-me but tested working pristine KT76A. Tucson Aero checked connectors, wiring and the encoder to 16 k/ft hot/cold as a system, and never saw a problem (while noting via email that the encoder in there now "is a Narco Gillham and that would be suspect at this time"). I'm going to have the encoder swapped locally. I was looking at the SSD120-35C-RS232, which TA says is as good as any other selection. It's RS-232 (future) and grey code (KT76A), and, cheap ($215). A self-styled avionics guru at the local FBO vehemently suggested I go with the SSD120-30N-RS232 instead ($349), and that the 35C was a "piece of junk." Any opinions? Alternatives? (Still not sure if I'll go GTX-345 or just slap a GDL-82 on the back of the KT76A...) It's been a trip so far: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3wWtj5n3Y6QQTFhUV9CdG1IV3c I have 63.4 hours in her at this point, despite it being down for a month with no radios (expected when I bought it; the Terra equipment was prehistoric), then down for a week with a flat nose tire (sigh), then in Tucson for six weeks. ‡ When I fix up the interior, I'll run new wiring that will work with the Garmin audio panel, and when I have a second source of audio (GTN-650), I'll install it along with that hardware. * But it enabled me to fly a couple of critical Pilots n' Paws missions in actual IMC down to minimums before it died, so, several rescue dogs say "thanks!"
  15. 1 point
    I'm betting production costs, tax structure, bureaucratic roadblocks, labor rates, and just about everything else are a lot more favorable in Texas than in California!
  16. 1 point
    I hope they sell it. My opinion - with a diesel engine, retractable gear, and a parachute, that thing would sell.
  17. 1 point
    I flew down to Grand Rapids, MI this morning to pick up a young boy after his weekly chemo treatment (was dropped off yesterday by one of our other pilots but blood count was too low to allow same day return). He gets really excited when he finds out he'll get a ride in the Lancair (this was his third flight in 4PT). He's been on weekly treatments since December and will finally go down to monthly in another month. One hour flight verses 7 hour drive each way so the family really appreciates it when we can fly them down. Anyway, they parked me next to this Mooney. Wondering if it belongs to anyone on Mooney Space? Tom
  18. 1 point
    You could no doubt buy all the tea in China for what these wingtips will cost.
  19. 1 point
    The back seat of an Ovation has plenty of room for two!
  20. 1 point
    From the pictures, I don't see how they plan on dealing with the external aileron balance weight?? Clarence
  21. 1 point
    Try this, Before shut down bring the rpm's to 1200, tighten the friction lock so you dont bump it getting out. Next pull mixture to cut off. Then when you restart, DONT TOUCH ANYTHING, just crank the engine. 5 blades or less the engine will fire, briskly move the mixture to rich and bring rpm's to 1000. This has never let me down and i live where it gets to 110+ in the summers.
  22. 1 point
    Your technique may be fine. It may be ignition related items that's the problem.
  23. 1 point
    Mageto looks like a great dog! I'm in the Mutt Muffs camp but will make a suggestion. I replaced the chin strap with an elastic strap that allows me to simply slide the muffs over Eli's head and into place. Not quite 5 years old he's logged 175 hours and has only dislodged them 2 or 3 times. IMO big floppy ears makes the muffs a bit less important but with Mag's erect ears I'd definitely use them. Since some of the funniest stories I've ever heard in aviation involve small dogs loose in airplane cabins we secure Eli in back with a harness and 3' leash which allows him to get up and turn around as desired. He's a big boy so the back seat's all his. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk