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  1. No offense, but nothing here says anything about his expertise with Mooney's. There are lots of experts in a lot of things. And seriously 20,000+ airline pilots are a dime a dozen. But there is a reason that people fly their Mooney's all the way across the country to be touched by Don Maxwell at KGGG or Paul Loewen at 1O2. The guy who taught me to fly, was and still is my mentor for all things aviation, is a 52,000 hour 747 Captain from PanAm and Braniff. 16,000+ hours as a CFI in the right seat of various Pipers. He did my Mooney check out when I bought my first (700 hours in Mooney's). He knows more about airplanes than anyone I know. But I wouldn't let him evaluate the rigging on my Mooney even if it was free.
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  2. Obviously your MooneySpace calibration isn't dialed in. There's a very specific error correction that is applied to all MooneySpace performance data. Think of it as Calibrated MS airspeed.
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  3. I can't imagine that the sealant will all fall off in one ferry flight, turning you into a flaming comet or causing an engine failure. I would question if at the last Annual the screens were even cleaned. Since you've owned it you've put on 40 odd hours and about 400 gallons of fuel and this is the first time you're checking the fuel system I'd be sure to clean the gascolator and screen, (be sure SB M20-200 is done), drain the carburetor bowl, clean the carburetor finger screen and sump the tanks into a clean glass jar to see what you've really got. Replace your fuel cap O rings per SB M20-229A. Then run the plane for an hour or two, then recheck the gascolator screen, once you see what's in the gascolator you can make a decision about a ferry flight for a strip and reveal or bladders. Without some proper diagnosis, your maintainer is only guessing at the severity of the sealant decay. Clarence
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  4. You never said at what rpm, mp, altitude, temperature, fuel flow, egt. You didn't even say if it is kias, kcas, ktas, or ground speed. At certain power settings or altitudes, 138kts is great. If you are getting 138kias at sub 75% power in the mid 5-7 thousand feet, that's sounds about right. True airspeed would be around 150 depending on conditions which is normal for a J. There's a chance you are chasing an engine/rigging problem when in reality it's an expectations problem. I typically get 150kts true airspeed on 9gph LOP at most altitudes 2500RPM.
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  5. Taking Bob's cowling strips in mind for the rear baffle seals over the ribs, I made a piece for mine today. Will drill and rivet with flame proof sealant to fill the edges and prevent air loss. David
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  6. I've owned 3 different Mooney models. Compared to Mooneyspace claims each of mine was the slowest example of its kind.
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  7. I thought the best place for ice was in a glass with alcohol. Clarence
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  8. It seems obvious to me, the OP is not looking for any advice from the collective Mooney experience on this board, but rather is looking to buy a set of used bladders for cheap. I plan to be up in your neck of the woods with my Mooney for the month of July (too hot in Texas). I'd love to buy you a beer, sit and discuss all things Mooney. I'm actually in a somewhat similar situation. My 252 has a leaky tank. We also discovered lots of bits of sealant in the fuel drains. It was at the time, in the shop at Southwest Texas Aviation which is a Mooney Service Center and very well regarded for all things Mooney. I discussed the situation with JD (owner STA) but also called and talked with the guys at Dugosh about a patch job and with Paul at Weep-no-more and Carl at Houston Tank Specialists. Properly armed with four somewhat different opinions, I made a decision. It involved a close check of both tanks. We decided the left tank was fine to fly on, but the right was a problem. So with all the useable fuel in the left tank, and all the drains cleaned and flushed, I flew it over to Carl at HTS. I'm just getting one tank done at this time as the left seems to be fine. $3750 and I'll pick it up on Feb 12.
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  9. I actually think his title is probably appropriate until it passes the pre-buy. Until then, it is all a money deal. Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
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  10. Oscar inspired me to try this. Here's my first test flight today.
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  11. I watched a commercial recently that had a young woman jogging and she came upon an old "fortune teller" type machine that said it would tell you how/when you would die. She hesitated and then dropped in a quarter and stuck her finger into the machine. A pin prick and whirring gears resulted in a small piece of paper being expelled from the machine. She slowly unfolded the paper and read: OLD AGE With a smile she turned and started to cross the street. Immediately struck by a car and killed. The old driver behind the wheel double clutching the steering wheel with heavy fists viewing out through coke bottle glasses and a rumpled old suit and hat was indeed-OLD...
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  12. In some cases the outer cable slips in its clamps, causing a loss of travel and lower RPM. With the cowls open wiggle the outer cable to see if it's secure. Clarence
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  13. For the finished product from Hawk Aircraft Painting and Hoover interiors. One stop shopping worked out very well!
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  14. Great video. I hadnt realised the newer models came with little open close gear doors like the big jets. I want one! .
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  15. If you select NAV audio as well you could monitor six. Not counting 60s on 6 from the GDL-69....
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  16. "Tally" is used as part of our comm brevity in the fighter community. Here's what it means and why it's important... tally: I see an enemy aircraft/target visual: I see a friendly aircraft no-joy: I don't see the enemy you are talking about blind: I don't see my flight lead/friendly you are talking about. if I come across a developed dogfight, and I don't know, or can't tell who's who, I would say "tally 2, status" to ask the engaged fighter which one he/she is. Once I figure it out, I can then say "tally, visual"... and hopefully shoot the bad guy once I get weapons deconfliction from the friendly. If I only see one jet- "tally one only"- then the good guy would describe the fight until I'm tally visual. my students tend to use "blind" often. Because they don't know where to look all the time while we're maneuvering... at that point, I owe them a "talk on" at which point they respond "visual"... and probably feel some shame at losing sight. Using "tally" in the ATC system? Depends on how threatened you are by the other aircraft, I guess! (J/k!)
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  17. I found today, putting my belly back on, that a few 3/4" long screws are useful for lining the belly pan up and getting started. The rest can be 1/2". Mine is a glorious mix, I've been replacing buggered up long screws with new, shorter ones. Don't think I could do it with all short screws, that long fiberglass belly is heavy, I need some long screws at the beginning. My new IA (this is my 2nd annual with him) also balances props. So we put the cheek panels on, pulled outside and hooked up to check mine since it was last dynamically balanced in June '02. All compressions are 76-80, the tach reads 22 RPM low, and vibration registered at 0.01, so I shut down, pushed back into the hangar and finished cowling up then put on the spinner. Everything finishes up tomorrow. It's been a busy weekend, and I opened all the panels last week after work. Annual started Friday morning, and I'm tired . . . The IA wants to make the Return to Service flight with me, so that'll be fun (weather permitting tomorrow; this morning's tornado warnings turned into nothing but rain, let's hope the same for tomorrow morning).
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  18. The 450 was a slide in replacement for my 8000BT so I am not sure if a separate wire is needed or not. To turn on the second radio monitoring, you start by selecting both radio's receive button (top button). Then push the "IntelliAudio" button. You then have two choices, if you turn "monitor" to the "on" position, you will be monitoring the second radio (the one where the XMT is not selected). If radio transmission begins on the primary radio, the second radio is muted. The other way is to select "IntelliAudio" and then select "IntelliAudio" again to either turn it on or put it in auto mode. Once in IntelliAudio mode you can move the location of either radio's sound location in your headset. My YouTube video on the 450 goes through most of this. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  19. When you sump the tanks before every flight are you noticing the pieces of sealant? If he's as stubborn as he sounds, sorry to say it, but despite him being the "most respected Master A&P / IA in the Northeast", it sounds like you've got the wrong guy. It sounds like he is holding the airplane hostage. Maybe I'm a little sensitive on this one since I had that happen once. Where are you located? Is it out of annual right now? If not I'd have him button it up and pay him for the work he's done and figure out how to safely get it to another place. If it is out of annual right now I'd still pay him for what he's done but politely tell him that you'd like a second opinion, with the option of coming back to him if need be. Is there anyone else on the field that can look at it? Can you tie it down on the field and is there another A&P/IA that would be willing to come to the airplane to have a look? Bladders are an option but being told that you have no other options is what makes this a bad deal.
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  20. I have absolutely no idea is this was related to vfr into imc as has been suggested. But I thought as long as we were taking guesses I'd add this one...
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  21. To M20Doc's comment- My Dad said that he kept moving even in his mid eighties by going to work every day in his one man machine shop. He wouldn't have made 86 if he didn't . My Mother in Law is 98, takes short walks 3 or 4 times a day and is still ambulatory at her age. Sitting in front of the TV all day eating chips a soda is what my Dad used to say- "You're digging your grave with your teeth!"
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  22. Well, To continue the morbidity: Or, to quote Christopher Hitchens, "We all know what's coming." It's just a little tap on the shoulder with a voice saying, "The party will continue, but you have to go now and you will never return." That being said, not sure the tap will work with Aaron Rodgers.
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  23. MooneyNate

    IMG-2370.JPG

    From the album My 65 C Model

    Cockpit with 430
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  24. I have about 1000 hours in that combination with a JPI930. Pretty much everyone will tell you that the intercooler requires reduced MP, but the adjustment charts supplied with the intercooler are aggressive, in other words, the engine does not require quite as much of an MP adjustment as the charts say. On takeoff, think of it this way. The reason for the downward MP adjustment is that the intercooler cools the induction air, making it denser than what is expected in the factory tables in the POH. However, the cooling effect is changing rapidly during the takeoff roll. At the approach end of the runway the plane is standing still, so there is little air passing over the intercooler fins to cool the induction air. On the departure end you are going somewhere in the 70-90 knot range, still much less than cruise. At cruise you will find a drop of around 100 dF, on takeoff not so much, maybe 60 dF and highly variable. In theory you could start the roll at 40" (the nonintercooled setting) and reduce during the roll, but you don't want to be messing with the MP at that point. I use 36, and I don't worry about it if MP is 37-35. Any of those power settings are ample power for takeoff and won't harm the engine. To make that power setting, if you have not flown a 231 before, you should be aware that the turbo will kick in and start to raise MP on its own during the roll, so you don't want to be aggressive with the throttle or you will find the engine overboosting once the turbo starts to work. I put the throttle in about half way, let the turbo get going, and then adjust to 36 (or so). The GAMI/APS people tell us that 50 ROP is just about the worst place to run an engine at cruise, if you want it to last. And there have been lots of 231 engines that need a top at 1200 running on the POH settings. I basically use two, a ROP setting and a LOP setting. I don't use MP to make the ROP setting. My JPI has a % power algorithm, it is about 8% conservative, but I use that as an indicator. I run at least 100 ROP and usually 125. I adjust to a fuel flow of 13.3 GPH. That is not based on a guess, it is based on many times using the ROP lean function on my JPI and that is where it always lands. I use 2450RPM, but that is just my own superstition, 2500 works fine. MP is about 29". Lots of people run at 12.5 and I believe that is where the POH wants you for "best power." There is no doubt you will get more power and speed than at my 13.3 GPH, you will also be running in the "red box" and headed for a top at 1200. The thing about MP is that it is not fixed, to generate a particular %HP, as many people assume. Rather, the MP needed to achieve a particular power setting changes with air density and temperature, and since we are able to fly quite high in the 231, cruise MP can vary. That is why I use the JPI %power algorithm, it adjusts for those variables. I climb to altitude full rich. The engine needs to be making 22.5-24.0 GPH per the POH, and it really does. You do not want to lean it out at full power. That is an NA technique and not at all applicable to turbos. That said, I know some turbo pilots who do lean during the climb, I suppose it is ok if you watch the temps like a hawk, but my experience is that especially on a hot day and especially out west, you will see temps you don't want to see. I just climb full power full rich to whatever altitude is my target. That is what APS recommends, and what I have done for quite a few hours now. I know a very good PPP instructor with a 231, and he uses a cruise climb, setting power at 32". That's nice, but what he doesn't understand and I can see on my JPI is that at some point in the teens, 32" is full power. I did quite a bit of experimenting to get to a good LOP setting. What I realized is that since LOP is a fuel/air mixture where there is more air than at a stoichiometric mix, there are two ways to get more LOP, fuel and air, duh!. And in turbos we have the ability to change the air quite a bit more than the NA operators. So that is partly what I do, add more air. My normal LOP MP setting is 34" of MP, which would normally result in quite a high power setting if operating ROP, but I dial the fuel flow down to 11.0-11.1 GPH. On the LOP side, %HP is governed by fuel flow and not by MP. The formula for our LB engines is 13.7 x fuel flow = HP. Divide HP by 210 (full rated HP) and you have percent HP while LOP. A fuel flow of 11.0-11.1 results in a power setting of about 70-71%. I can't stand flying the long trips I do at 65% or less, it is just too slow. The plane gets cranky at 75% LOP which is about 11.5 gph. Temps get persistently too high. You want to keep the TIT at or below about 1600, and the CHT's as close to 380 as you can, and if they creep over 400 do something different, like to ROP or trail the cowl flaps. So the 11 GPH setting is about as much power as I can generate without going over temp. I find that I cannot generally fly LOP up high in the summer. At some point in the mid-teens the temps just get too high. Trailing the cowl flaps helps to a degree, but at some point I just go over to my dependable ROP setting. I suppose I could do it if I went to 65%, which would be 10 GPH (9.96 to be exact), but it is too slow for me. It may be that your LB won't run LOP very well. That is true of many of them. The induction system is very untuned, and it is possible to have some cylinders at peak, near peak or even over on the rich side, while others are quite lean. So some engines will start to run rough at LOP. GAMI injectors will generally fix that, they insure a more even fuel flow from cylinder to cylinder. When I make my descent from cruise I don't mess with the red knob if I have been at LOP while cruising. I make all my adjustments with MP. You will find that descending from a high cruising altitude, say in the flight levels, and especially with a high tailwind aloft, will take some getting used to. I pull off about an inch of MP and just tip the nose over and adjust to 500 fpm. I pull an inch off the MP because it is going to rise about that much with the ram air effect. If you were at a TAS of, say, 175, and had, say, a 50 knot tailwind aloft, you were cruising at 225 knots. On descent you will now be at somewhere around 240 to 270, so you are coming in at a good clip. Obviously if you are penetrating cumulus, you want to slow for turbulence, but that is not nearly as common as you might think. If you were at 21,000 and your field is at 1,000, you have 20k to lose and at 500 fpm (to avoid popping ears) you will need 40 minutes. At, say, 250 knots, you will in theory cover 165 nm. I say "in theory" because the descent will slow because of two variables, adjustment to TAS with altitude, and loss of the tailwind. The adjustment to TAS will be a constant, but the loss of tailwind varies quite alot with the weather patterns. Sometimes you might have a 75 knots tailwind at cruise, which will be 30 knots at 12,000 and 10 or 15 at approach altitude. Some days you will enjoy a good tailwind all the way down. I normally start my descent at somewhere from 100 to 125 nm out, depending on what kind of wind change I expect on the way down. It is as much art as math. But the important point is that, just as you will need to adjust MP upward as you ascend, you will need to adjust it downward as you descend, but if you are at that 11.0 GPH LOP setting I just leave the fuel flow alone and do all the adjusting with the MP knob. You will see some nice, low fuel flows and cool temps, and the engine will be happy with you. Be sure to ask ATC to start your descent while you are a good ways out. They will invariably take some time to clear the descent, so if you needed 125 nm when you asked and they mess around for several minutes you now might have 90-100, and then of course they will want to give you a crossing point 50 nm out, so you now need to descend at 1000 fpm or more. It is not a big deal, just push the nose over further, but it will be harder on ears and a waste of all that energy you built up getting to altitude in the first place. In fact, I keep that leaned out setting all the way to short final. If the LB engine is properly set up, it will be very rich near the ground if you have the mixture in. The result is "burbling," the engine will sound like it is missing because it is overrich. The cure is to lean it out at the low power settings you will use during final approach, but when you are near the ground make it rich and just put up with the burbling. That way you are set up for a go around. The Merlyn has practically nothing to do with fuel settings. The Merlyn does two things for you. First, it controls bootstrapping. Bootstrapping is where you, say, add power, then the turbo spins up so you have more power, which makes the turbo spin faster yet, which makes more power, etc. That was an issue with the factory engine but not with the Merlyn controlled engine. The other is critical altitude. CA is the altitude where the engine no longer makes full power. In the non-Merlyn engine that is in the mid-teens, so climb after CA is a very slow affair. In my engine with the Merlyn it is around 21-22k. Although your service ceiling is 24k there is not much reason to go up that high. The time of useful consciousness if your O2 system fails starts to drop sharply, 21-22 is all I find I ever need. So the Merlyn will give you full power climb to a flight level cruise. One final note, when your mechanic sets the fuel flows up, double check and make sure you are getting 22-24.5 GPH at full power, and full power for you is 36-37, not 40". There is information in the STC on how to do it with the intercooler installed. Some modifications need to be made to the standard fuel flow method, which is a SID. I don't remember the SID number off the top of my head but your mechanic will know. Just be aware that there is a modification of the SID in the STC, and the mechanic needs to follow that. I can't tell you how many times I have had mechanics set the fuel flow at annual or otherwise, and I find I can only get 19 GPH at full power. Not enough.
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  25. Now that we did our usual thing to a thread, it is time for this pilot to "turn and not burn" and "bug out" of this thread. Hope they determine the cause. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  26. This mode of operation is in agreement with recommendations from Mike Busch and also Tornado Alley Turbos. They both say that maximum engine life is achieved by keeping peak cylinder internal pressures as low as possible, and CHT not to exceed 380 degrees F at any time. LOP is the only way these goals can be achieved. My 231 has GAMI injectors, so LOP should work. Thanks for the info.
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  27. It was a requirement for me when I was hunting for a Mooney.
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  28. Here is the SB in question. http://www.mooney.com/en/sb/M20-200.pdf Clarence Edit, Has anyone ever installed a Helicoil to repair the stripped thread?
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  29. The units are transmitting information about themselves to the FAA. In 2015, the FAA began taking steps to stop the use of portable ADS-B "out" equipment. In 2016, they began blocking ground based client responses to these devices. The TSO equipment defined in the rebate is the same as they expect to be installed in the plane with or without the rebate. From the rebate program: FAA ADS-B site: https://www.faa.gov/nextgen/equipadsb/faq/#q8 From ForeFlight: https://support.foreflight.com/hc/en-us/articles/205428857-Can-I-use-a-portable-ADS-B-Out-system-in-my-aircraft- Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  31. We forgive you, Andrew. It's about 1,000 miles from Concorde, NH (where the OP lives- New England) and Paul Beck at Weep No More (Minnesota- Injun country.) Please don't quiz me on my British geography. I can drive from Heathrow to my brother's place near Gloucester but only if I use GPS (I believe you call it "Sat Nav")
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  32. So I'm confused. I know how to monitor the second radio using the PMA 450a. And I was able to set up the IntelliAudio to move the secondary around in the headset. But is there an option that would allow me to monitor the Standby frequency on the IFD540 flipping it to Active? That would seem to be an IFD function? If this is indeed the case, I don't know how to do it. And after some reading of the install doco's for both the IFD540 and the PMA450a, sure enough the option exists. And seems easy enough to enable on both units. This could be a very valuable feature. Especially when flying formation with the Caravan guys.
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  33. I use "no joy" when I don't see called traffic; when I do, I say, "traffic in sight." "Tally ho" reminds me of WWII movies with the fighters diving on enemy formations . . .
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  34. Yes I think you need another connection wired for that. Add it to the list . . lol
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  35. Here is the link to the power settings i previously uploaded along with the POH supplement for airflow systems set up. I also had a Merlyn.
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  36. Intercooler has its own separate power chart so yes don't use the original POH or you will overboost. I think i posted the chart here once prior so look around on the site. Mine was an airflow systems intercooler. Take off is 37 inches at 2700 rpm with a fuel flow to be at 24.9 GPH, cruise climb is 31 inches 2600 rpm at around 18 GPH... if you can't find the chart let me know and ill send you one... Do you have the airflow systems intercooler or the turbo plus?
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  37. "Supposedly sealed 3 yrs. ago"?? Either they were or they weren't. Who did the re-seal?
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  38. Take a big breath FH603... You have two threads discussing the same thing simultaneously. Getting to the bottom of what the challenge is first, is a good idea. Then work on the solutions. Get ready to read your logs, looking for a few updates and maintenance details. Since you are in Annual at this time... Now would be a good time to see what is in the gascolator. Got any pictures? Proceed slowly and methodically... Best regards, -a-
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  39. New version (8.6.1) supposedly fix the issue, cannot confirm yet.
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  40. Yup. As I've been doing for almost 50 years. Might not be PC, but clear and brief. Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
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  41. Welcome aboard, There is a lot missing in your statements. You have just joined MS after buying a Mooney? Expect to get some help, but it might not sound very friendly at first. We are avid Mooney pilots first, and not always the best writers... Sounds like a good time to start with a review of everything. Make a list of what is working. And what is not... 1) Starting with how are you measuring the speed, and what are your expectations? Most Mooney pilots discuss speed in terms of KTAS at a given altitude and power setting. Then they use a three way course and a GPS driven ground speed to determine how well the ASI is actually working. 2) Next steps are with the instruments. When they are forty years old, they may no longer be in calibration. MP, RPM, and FF... These are the devices that will let you know if the engine is OK to fly behind. 300 rpm slow is greater than 10% of available HP and equates to a very long T/O run and slow rate of climb. Around once each year a new Mooney owner comes aboard after buying a plane without much of a PPI. They took on the risk that everything might work out well. Sometimes they find some metal in their oil filter during the oil change. Power is directly related to cam performance. If the cam is failing, the power will be off... The rpm being this far off is not a normal thing. Use an iPhone app to obtain what the rpm really is for comparison. Is the low rpm something new after purchase? (A low time pilot with a check list would have found this on a test ride) the prop's governor can make the engine look bad. Setting the governor properly is a simple mechanic's job. Rpm indicators can be off by 50 rpm, not 300. 3) Feelings about how well a plane is rigged will be very misleading. Proper rigging requires tools and procedures. A mechanic can balance a plane to fly straight. It will feel right it will also be slower than a properly rigged aircraft. 4) Did you really buy a plane without a pre purchase inspection, PPI? 5) expect taking a Mooney to a qualified shop to check on things can be very expensive. Do as much as you can yourself before dropping a plane off and asking them to look at everything... I hope this is helpful. I'm only a Private Pilot with crummy writing skills... Best regards, -a-
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  42. Washington is having two events. The Ball and the Riot. Pick your venue. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  43. Another example of upgrades that are much cheaper when done by the previous owner.
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  44. Cyril -- this is true for Class D airports. They are not providing radar separation although as Turbo (I got to figure out what his real name is) mentioned above many Class D towers have a Brite display and can see what the overlying radar facility sees. They just aren't responsible for separation services. For Class B, C and TRSAs and enroute (flight following), you will find that you are assigned a unique code. I have never contacted any of those facilities and not been given a unique code. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  45. I think that really hot weather is harder on a battery than cold. My experience is that batteries die whenever they decide to. The problem is they are so expensive, we will do almost anything to try to squeeze extra life out of them.
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  46. My first approach video with my Garmin VIRB 30 flying my Trillian. This is the GPS Zulu approach.
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  47. This is a time compressed (16 min) flight from our local airport in Allentown PA to Kennedy in NY; the flight is normally about 50 minutes give or take. I know a lot of pilots who are very apprehensive about flying into big airports and Bravo airspace. I can tell you that you have no worries as long as you plan ahead well, study the airspace, procedures, taxi diagrams and have all that ready at liftoff. This was a fairly busy day for approach control so there is a lot of good ATC, we also had an interesting final approach vector. We’re in a 1996 Mooney M20M Bravo. Most of the panel is identifiable, but you will see the Garmin AoA on the glare shield. Hope you enjoy it as much as we had fun flying it!
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  48. Dan, Can you share your icing curriculum with us? Thanks, Dave
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  49. It's pretty critical to stay out of icing conditions in any small plane that's not FIKI equipped - especially laminar flow wings. Hell, I've been in enough icing conditions flying RJ's around the country that I wouldn't consider taking a small GA plane into, period (even if it was FIKI equipped). Like Dave said earlier... Ice is where you find it. However, there are certainly things you can do to reduce and eliminate your chances of encountering it. The FAA's rules pretty much guarantee that you will remain out of icing conditions. Is it conservative? Yes. But when it comes down to it, if you stay out of all visible moisture when the temperatures are below freezing, you WILL NOT encounter ice.
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  50. I'm pretty new to the turbo, but my philosophy is similar to yours, below freezing + clouds = not going in. If I can top it and still have an out below to get out I might go but I haven't yet. Sure there have been days I wish I had flown but I haven't had one yet that I wish I hadn't!
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