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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/08/2021 in all areas

  1. On a simple 4-cylinder engine, the Mooney squeezes out quite a bang for the buck. The following compares the 201 model comfort, load, performance, efficiency and safety to other aircraft. Enjoy! Comfort One common misconception is that the Mooney ain’t the most roomy plane around. People have said that the cabin feels cramped. Despite that claim, the Mooney is still bigger than most four-seater planes. Check this out: Aircraft Cabin Width Cabin Height Mooney 201 43.5″ 44.5″ Beechcraft V35 Bonanza 42.0″ 50.0″ Cessna 182 42.0″ 48.0″ Piper Arrow 41.0″ 45.0″ As you can
    5 points
  2. It's really not that much. I mean, I'm at 15,000 10 min after brake release which is 1/6 of an hour..so at most 6 gallons to climb. Then I'm doing 198 KTAS around 18.5 gph...which is a lot, I grant you...but God is it glorious. And that's 65% power: loafing, not even pushing the engine at all. It's what Disney long ago called an "E-ticket ride"
    4 points
  3. Flight #5 yesterday. We flew the RNAV GPS approach into KTOA again and then the missed approach with the hold. The radio work was a little better although I lost track of where I was on the approach into KTOA and into KFUL and didn't get my gear down and configured before crossing the FAF resulting in being behind the plane the rest of the approach. Still, small steps forward, next flight is Wednesday evening. Complete writeup on my blog along with the audio of the tower telling me to "keep in your own lane sir" when I drifted over the parallel runway at KTOA flying the missed approach. h
    4 points
  4. When I bought my K I asked here on MS if full tanks, 75 gal, was to the bottom of the filler neck or as much fuel as one could could stuff in while being patient. I didn't get any real good answers. The POH does not say. Logic would say 75 gallons is to the bottom of the filler neck since it gets pretty tedious to fill past that. But when my JPI + CIES was installed and the shop calibrated the system it turned out that 75 gallons is as much as you can stuff in. It is about 5 gallons total, or 2.5 gallons per side, between the bottom of the filler neck and totally full. A couple yea
    3 points
  5. The first time I flew a Rocket, someone asked me to fly it to the paint shop in Wickenburg from Steller Air Park. At the time the base of the class C was at 4000. I had never flown a Rocket before and this one had a verniers throttle. After takeoff, I was at the base of the class C in no time and I couldn’t get that damn throttle to come back fast enough, so I worked on the trim. Damn that thing could climb!
    3 points
  6. I did back in the mid 90s. I have a little over 100 hours, mostly thermals but a bit of ridge and wave time.
    2 points
  7. I got it back over the weekend. Just flew it the 12 miles home . . . looking forward to getting used to the new layout.
    2 points
  8. Knowing nothing about this particular airplane, the first thoughts that strike me are if he was that devoted to his airplane, it would've been in better shape, and secondly, Camguard isn't a magic solution that keeps idle engines sitting around for years from rusting. Where is the airplane located? What are the total times on AF and engine? Do you have access to the logbooks? Steve
    2 points
  9. How did you determine there is no problems with the cam or lifters? Did you pull the cylinders?
    2 points
  10. My controls actually have those on them. But in this hangar photo, they aren't "to the wall" . . . . And yes, this is an old picture, the stupid CO card has been replaced by a Sensorcon (thanks, Dan!).
    2 points
  11. Hey guys, I thought I would upload this simple hack. Most portable/handheld Garmin units come with a yoke mount. Mine sat on the shelf until now. This aluminum yoke mount can be used as a oil filter cutter. All you need is the little cutting wheel and this one dollar packet of hardware from Lowe’s. It works just as well as the $100 cutters out there.
    2 points
  12. Short regional airline career and more family heartbreak: I left my family in early January 2020 and flew out to CAE for an ATP CTP ground program. It involved 40 hours or so of ground instruction, a written exam, and 10 hours of Level D sim time. For this program I logged Boeing 737 Level D sim time (pretty cool – especially since I wasn’t logging Mooney Missile time). Next stop was immediately INDOC which was a two-week program with two written tests at the end of each week. I passed the ATP written during this timeframe as well. Immediately following INDOC was systems. Sadly, my m
    2 points
  13. Balls to the wall in the climb. I get about 37.5", 2650 rpm, 34-36 gph (very cold air right now, 34 in summer). Right now with 75 gallons on board, me and my wife, about 3065 lb gross, around 1500 fpm. For the first several months I thought the thing was 35" and 2500 rpm but discovered (thanks to MS) that you get better cooling with full throttle. 30" and 2200 is a fine cruise setting but I can't imagine you can keep 130 KIAS with that and more than maybe 500 fpm?
    2 points
  14. Do you have a fuel flow gauge? Usually that's what substitutes for FP, since the fuel flow gauge is usually actually a fuel pressure gauge.
    2 points
  15. 2 points
  16. Storm, First let’s ask a few questions... like... why would your friend do that? If you have 305hp available, and you want to get to the flight levels... and cruise at maximum speed... Climbing out at 65%bhp sounds like leaving a lot of performance on the table... On the other hand, your friend has chosen a very cool approach to cylinder wear, and that must be important to him... No two Rocket flyers are going to operate the same way, every day... There are conservative, LOP days... flying slower, with maximum CHT and TIT control.... Then there are le
    2 points
  17. I think you mean depreciating liability
    2 points
  18. Pretty unlikely. Insurance costs seem to run in cycles like most economic measures. And, increases and decreases will hit the entire market. So if your question is: Will insurance become so expensive that no one buys small airplanes any longer?, then historically, that hasn't happened. If your question is: Will Mooneys be singularly disadvantaged by insurance costs relative to competitive models? then I don't believe history has shown that to be the case either. Skip
    2 points
  19. That cowling appears to be installed incorrectly. That U-channel with the cam loc should be on the inside of the firewall flange. That camloc will then go through the firewall flange into the u-channel along with the screw on the upper cowling.
    2 points
  20. Is that you? You just won the cool contest! I mean you’re a 252 owner, so already cool. Soon to be an Encore, even cooler! But hang gliding a 10000 feet? You win. I resign.
    1 point
  21. I should add the @carusoam caveat that I am not an AME / A&P or avionics technician, so take my comments as worthless until confirmed by one of those. There are several really good ones on this forum so expect to hear from one soon. The Carusoam Caveat. Did I just coin a new phrase?
    1 point
  22. I recal some (3/8"?) aluminium tubing connects the vent outlet of the main tank to the extended tank top. And yes, in order to fill the extened tanks, which are higher than main tanks, you have to have the main tank fuel cap in place or the fuel added to the extended tank will drain out the main tank filler neck hole. But without the vent line connected to the extended tank it would just trap air at the top of the main tank and prevent fuel from occupying the top of the main tank outboard. Or to put it another way, when you're filling both tanks the vent in the main tank gets filled with fuel
    1 point
  23. Don’t have to, you can pull the barrel lifters, Lycoming mushroom lifters you can’t.
    1 point
  24. I thought they had their own in house FAA inspector, like Boeing.
    1 point
  25. That makes perfect sense, I missed the fact that it was part of a sub-item in the limitations section. Was just reading it as a straight limitation. For the M20M through M20V, looks like page 6 & 7. Item 10g applies to alternators. At some point I’ll learn to pay attention to the details. As always, thanks for the quick answer!
    1 point
  26. Another option for you would be to use the speed and fuel sliders to bump up the 231 performance if yours is faster. I do this for my TN, reducing speed by 5% (TKS and imperfect rigging) and am usually within less than a gallon or .1 flight time. -dan
    1 point
  27. Hi William (same name as my son!)- I'm out with the regional I did the training with. I'm not out of the industry. I fly for a 135, will be flying jets for them soon (SF50), and am very open to returning to the 121 would at some point. However, the communication break down that occurred at the regional, asking me to get back for sim training to then send me home a few days later when I had my wife at the hospital after losing our second recent pregnancy - it left a bad taste in my mouth. Especially since I asked if it made better sense to push my training back for medical/family reasons. I eve
    1 point
  28. All of this is true, but remember that the originals are likely 40-50 years old. I've repaired mine also and they looked good....for a couple years. Then the 50 year old plastic started doing what 50 year old plastic does. Eventually it's like trying to glue potato chips back together. The plane plastics panels do require trimming, but it's not rocket science and...to me...worth the effort. I'm actually in the middle of replacing the wall panel right now. Will be trimming it today.
    1 point
  29. I’m assuming (and yes, I know what happens when I assume) that Garmin has much deeper pockets to push through multiple airframes through the certification process at once than Dynon can. Might have something to do with why their AP prices are so much higher than Dynon’s too. BWTHDIK?
    1 point
  30. Thanks Alex! I'm not going back - go ahead and PM me with contact info - I'll call with the information you requested. I wish no ill will on the airline but they did not handle things in a professional manner. It went from taking care of their own to getting as many off the books as possible - which is a good business move - it just sucked timing wise - and the communication and circumstances left a lot be desired along with the reasoning and threats - again - happy to talk one on one with anyone about it - just not going to post those details on a public forum. The timing was insane
    1 point
  31. As mentioned, there are ferry tank systems that can be added via a 337, and this is commonly done for long overwater flights in many different types of aircraft. They are temporary installations that can be removed once no longer needed.
    1 point
  32. Get some "bullets" made to help line up the engine into the mount bolts. "Bullets" are like ground down old bolts to helo center the engine to go over the last couple bolts, except you'll use these bullets and then swap them out with the real bolts. They also help you keep from damaging the threads on the new bolts as you work hard to get them intio alignment. A hoist that also includes a leveler - which hopefully your mechanic already has - is also really helpful to lower the engine without it being tilted. As always putting it back together takes 3x as long as it took to get it off, b
    1 point
  33. Rich is getting to know my level 2 mechanical skills on a scale of 1 - 10... Fortunately, the diode I fried was on my tug... it’s new battery was physically different than the old battery... the posts were reversed +/-... somehow normal for some lawn tractors.... In the case of reverse wiring a diode on a lawn tractor.... complete smoke show... fried, gone... dead... Best regards, -a-
    1 point
  34. Ceis has two outputs for their floats... analog that will work with your existing gauges... and digital that will work warpath your future instrument.... The cool thing about the Cies analog output... it is even more precise than the old standard... more segments to provide a more refined output... If interested... we have the Cies guy around here.... he can be found by putting these together... @ fuellevel.... Of course... if a set of floats likes Richard’s works... do that... economic sensability is important to getting to the next level... Best regards,
    1 point
  35. I think Pete was looking to search through the finished product... And found searching through this non-standardized data collection to be extra challenging... Best regards, -a-
    1 point
  36. Assuming this is for real and not a troll. If the mission is to fly from Fl to the Bahamas and you want to carry a lot of “stuff” a Cherokee 6 is tough to beat. Face it Fl to anywhere in the Bahamas is a short trip so speed and efficiency isn’t as important, and nothing will carry more for less money than a Cherokee 6
    1 point
  37. After much deliberation and looking at many of the home-made varieties I purchased a set of the Alpha Jacks a couple of years ago. I think it has been one of the best purchases of "hangar tools" that I have made. They are a one-time purchase and if you average it out over the ownership time of the plane they really aren't very expensive.
    1 point
  38. Anyone want to guess Howard’s decade of birth? 1) If you were born in the 50s... fresh out out of the big war... heading into a few more... you would sit on the fence wondering what will happen next. 2) Born in the 60s... love was everywhere, flowers in the hair... airplanes rolling out of factories by the thousands... interest rates were near 6%... and race riots were the norm.. 3) By the 70s... inflation was wiping out your savings... gas lines ran around the block... cars only lasted five years... interest rates were near 16%... Lay-offs were announced on the nightly news.
    1 point
  39. In drilling plastics, they crack as the drill bit exits the other side. If you support the work piece well on a piece of wood, it is much less likely to break. I have used standard bit on plexiglass and lexan many times. Truth is, I have probably cracked two out of a hundred.
    1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. When I was contemplating purchasing my first airplane, a good friend and owner of a really nice TR182 told me that the best part of ownership is that the flying is free. "Free?", I asked. "Yeah", he replied. "It costs so much to hangar and insure and inspect and maintain the thing that the gas and oil to go fly for an hour is essentially free." Richard Bach once wrote that he wanted to buy a certain airplane but was struggling to justify the cost. But then he realized that he really wanted a twin and that burned a lot more gas and had two engines to maintain. So by not buying th
    1 point
  42. Another flight Wednesday night. We flew the RNAV GPS approach to 29R at KTOA down to LPV minimums. My accuracy and scan continues to improve but still a long way to go. Still trying to get used to the radios for IFR work even though I'm more than comfortable even in the busy LA Airspace on the radios when on flight following, it's just the extra brainpower required to fly instruments doesn't leave a whole lot leftover for the radios. It is reminiscent of when I first started flying and it took most of my brainpower to just fly straight and level or make turns while VFR leaving little left to w
    1 point
  43. I’d be interested in seeing the certification criteria these companies are being subject to by the FAA. I can’t help but feel the FAA was advertising lightening up the certification criteria to enhance safety in older aircraft, while at the same time requiring so much data and testing as it becomes financially unreasonable for a company to provide an affordable system, therefore no liability on the Faa. The whole concept of a servo that moves the flight control driven by some navigational guidance, just doesn’t seem all that complicated. It’s simply doing the same thing the knucklehe
    1 point
  44. I have the same plan, but honestly for me spending a minimum of $10k on the Monroy tanks didn't make sense vs just going straight to a temporary Turtlepac install. (I have plans to go well beyond just the Atlantic though).
    1 point
  45. I know how you feel and I also use 2350/18 while training so I could get used to the coms... after my G5 gets installed- back to ifr training for me! love the blogs ;o) -Don
    1 point
  46. Flights 2 and 3 were last Wednesday evening and Saturday morning. Flying at night with foggles is great, there are no shadows from the sun to give you any outside reference. We just did more basic maneuvers (turns/climbs/descents/straight and level) along with some more unusual attitude recoveries. The first couple were easy, the third one after a couple turns I lost track of what he was doing and had no idea what I was going to see on the AI when he said "recover." That was a great experience. Saturday we flew a practice approach into Long Beach and did some partial panel work before going ba
    1 point
  47. I took my first IFR training flight yesterday. I loved it even though I was chasing the plane, felt like I was behind it almost the whole time, and ended up so task saturated that on our return while flying the RNAV into KFUL I was looking at the vertical deviation which showed us above glideslope but I was holding us level thinking we were below glideslope. I have used it enough just for fun in VFR conditions that I know how to read the instrument, but my brain was not helping me out... Some great experience and looking forward to the next flight Wednesday night. If you want to read abou
    1 point
  48. In my J, I use WOT, full prop, and Vx climb to 1,000' then nose over and keep a 115-120 kt. climb until it drops to 500 FPM. Then it is whatever speed will maintain 500 FPM until my cruising altitude. During the climb, I start leaning at 3,000' to maintain my takeoff EGTs. Once at cruise, it is nose over, close up cowl flaps, set prop to 2,500 RPM, and lean to my desired EGTs. In flight climb is WOT, 2,600 RPM, enrich fuel, open cowl flaps, and keep 105-110 kt. climb. Down here in Alabama in the summer, this typically keeps my oil temp below 200 and my hottest CHT is <360 dF.
    1 point
  49. We now interrupt your currently scheduled discussion of accents to return you to your regular programming of the actual thread... After this you can go back to talking about how everyone talks differently. I was fortunate to get a great DPE whom I think has the right perspective on a check-ride. Check Ride!!!! The day is finally here! When this was scheduled a few weeks ago it seemed so far away... It was hard to believe as I was driving to the airport that by this afternoon I was very likely going to have my Private Pilot Certificate (unless something completely unexpected
    1 point

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