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  1. Some of you might remember me. Back in 2019 Signature over torqued the front gear of my brand new Acclaim Ultra and refused to pay. 5 years later, I face them in court tomorrow. They are risibly stating using a huge boom was not an issue and that it’s my fault. I haven’t cowered. I covet your prayers. These guys are nasty. On better news, I now fly a Honda Jet. This is more accountability than anything else. Cheers, tail winds, and Gods overarching presence to you and yours.
    23 points
  2. I know some people here have much better machines, but my trip yesterday was an eye-opener to the capabilities of my E model. Took off from KRKS (Western WY) at 10am, and five and a half hours later landed at 91C in Eastern WI, crossing five states (WY, NE, SD, IA, WI). 993 miles non-stop at an average speed of 190 mph, burned 46 gallons of fuel at 13,500 feet. Of course tailwind helped (around 25kts), but I still feel amazing about it. I used oxygen all the way, and felt none of the fatigue I used to feel after flights above 10k. Here's a picture of one of the more spectacular buildups I had to dodge along the way.
    18 points
  3. I want to thank everyone for the advice given to me that helped to make this happen! I bought a Mooney! My instructor and I were flying the flight school's Warrior and flew to a nearby airport. As we were taxiing back to head back to the runway I hit the brakes and pointed out the window "wow, look at the paint on that Mooney!" My instructor was pretty tired of hearing about Mooney this, Mooney that, so she said "you're such a dingus" and we kept rolling. Later that day I pulled up Controller to drool over Mooneys, and that exact one showed up for sale. I couldn't believe it. It was way over my budget too! A few Google searches later and I happened upon Mooneyspace and a guy had a sort of "near miss" with buying it. I reached out to him and he sent me the Prebuy information that he did, as well as the local Mooney Expert's information. Really nice of him to do that for me. I met with the owners and they were just the kindest people ever. Couldn't ask for a more lovely couple. The plane is a 1968 M20F, it isn't perfect but it is WAY nicer than what I thought I would end up getting. Some faded paint and minor issues, but nothing major. It's under an hour drive from me, and the A&P that did all of the speed mods, and maintained it for a good 20 years has a shop just 25 minutes from my house. Everything has lined up so well. I'm still in shock, and so excited. Today I have the keys! The owners kept every receipt and picture, so I have some nice pictures of it as they put some speed mods on it. I don't think I'm going to get any sleep tonight...
    17 points
  4. Hi all, I've used this forum for reference even before I became a Mooney owner 2 years ago. In June 2022 I purchased N111MR, a 1967 M20C from a fellow Mooniac and forum member, who sold me a plane that already had a lot of blood, sweat, and financial equity in it, with a dual Dynon Skyview HDX system, Hartzel Top Prop, and other great qualities, but the plane had original paint, an interior that left much to be desired, and I saw a great opportunity to make the plane 'mine.' After flying it for a summer, I decided I wanted to invest in paint and interior. I had no idea the magnitude of the project I had decided to undertake. Fast forward to June 2024 and last weekend the former owner and I picked up an unrecognizable airplane from Hawk Aircraft in Zephyrhills. N111MR (s/n 670130) is now N6767C. In the past 2 years this plane has undergone full strip, corrosion treatment and repaint in a custom livery I designed (@ Hawk), full gutting and installation of a custom interior @ GEMICO/Hawk), full strip and reseal of fuel tanks including new senders and pickups (@ WetWingologistsEast), prop balancing (@ Solano Aircraft Services in TOA), new flaps, and wing spar splice (@ Dugosh). I am incredibly happy with the results and I'm still not done. I plan to have a one-piece panel cut by Superior Aircraft and possibly add the AeroCruze 100 AP. I greatly missed flying this airplane for the 1 year and 8 months it was 'in treatment.' I logged 2h total in 2023, only flying the airplane from paint to reseal and back to paint. Since picking it up I have logged 14h and plan to fly this en lieu of flying on the airlines (within reason). As a career graphic and visual designer, and someone who used to draw cars and airplanes all over his schoolwork, it had always been a dream to design an airplane livery and have it become a reality. If any of you are race fans, you will immediately see what this livery is inspired by. I also added some modern touches to make this airplane even more unique.
    12 points
  5. Ordered a set of visors from @DonMuncy My '66E had the center mount visor. Mr. Muncy fabricates a fully articulating visor with nicely sized hardware and smooth joints at a very fair price. I fabricated a very crude bracket for each side and used existing Mooney hardware to install to avoid any alteration to the plane. Hopefully my bracket will hold up over time. If not, I have no problem having paid Mr. Muncy a modest sum for his hand-made engineering. My Wemac baffles above are courtesy of @Utah20Gflyer's design. I built a vacuum forming machine and formed them from 1/16 ABS. Also copied @piperpainter's backseat mod w/ a slight twist. I guess it's time for me to confess that I've been lurking on this forum for a long time saving and compiling information. I have definitely taken more than I've given. I try to database any information that I might need in the future to repair or obtain equivalent parts to keep this plane in the air. And I can't quit buying up everything that comes available that I think I might need in the future. Why am i buying Brittain stuff from Bonanza guys? And why did I buy that lot of various early Mooney inspection panels? I save instruction articles such as @Shadrach's thorough course on hydraulic flap maintenance/overhaul or @carusoam's bullet points and I've saved just about everything @M20Doc has said. I do try to buy from the folks here. I ordered @donkaye's landing video. I have @takair's electric step conversion sitting in my hangar waiting to install. Picked up a battery charger from @OSUAV8TER shortly after I bought the plane. Anyway, I'm thankful for the folks on this forum and your willingness to share your years of experience and expertise. I fly out of a rural airport in the middle of nowhere in SW Louisiana. Without the information here, I will quickly run into something that will ground me. -David
    11 points
  6. IT FLIES. Install is completed, oil leak is fixed and we test flew the plane yesterday. A few minor tweaks to be done. I am headed to Garmin for training, so will pick up the plane late next week and start putting hours on it to find any remaining things that need to be tweaked. WOOHOO,
    10 points
  7. There is a reason that plane has sat for a year: it needs MONEY! Will this be your first plane ownership experience? Do you want to buy and fly, or buy and spend a bunch of time and money, not to mention frustration trying to get to fly? This one sounds like you are looking for a 'deal' on price...don't do that! My $0.02 of advice: Buy a plane that has been and is being frequently flown.
    10 points
  8. Over Big Horn Canyon dam and national recreation area, SE of Billings (great local sight seeing route on the way to Cody WY). My wife's first flight in the new plane:
    10 points
  9. EDIT 6/21/2024. More than 150 guides emailed so far. Getting a lot of good feedback. I decided to add photos to the guide this time and I think it made a HUGE difference. EDIT 6/18/2024. The guide is ready to go. It turned out to be over 50 pages once I added photos and it totals 17,541 words. Owners can email me (address below) and I will send a free copy. Non-Mooney owner's cost will be $35. We will work out details through email. I am getting the 2024 Mooney Pre-201 Valuation Guide proofed at this time and hope to be able to send it out in the next week to 10 days. The guide is FREE for Mooney owners. It currently sits at 27 pages of Mooney history and value information as it pertains to the Mooney Models M20C / E / F / G. It will lead you through the process that I use when I talk to owners about putting a price on their aircraft. I know quite a few of you got the guide back in 2019 and I still get requests for it now (I got a lot of good feedback on the last one. Here is how Mooney owners get it: email me at jimmy@gmaxamericanaircraft.com and just put 'Value Guide' in the subject line. Either in the subject line or in the body, give me your tail number. If you are not a Mooney owner, you can also email and I can tell you a little more about the guide and tell you how to get one. I plan on getting the M20J and M20K guides out by the end of July and then an M20M and M20R guide out at some point in the late summer or early fall. Thanks everyone! Jimmy
    9 points
  10. At my last employer, the owner had an B36TC. I think he would have liked to come up with a policy that would exclude me from flying and allow him to fly, but he couldn't. Our planes were both IFR single engine turbocharged airplanes and I had more hours and more license than he did. FWIW, About 35 years ago I worked for a company where the owner owned a Cessna Cutlass RG. We raced to Tucson once and I beat him handially with my M20F. A week later he bought a turbo 182 RG. It could hang with me. At my last employer the owner owned half interest in an old Bonanza. We raced to Tucson too, and I beat him. About a month later he bought the B36TC. Now he outruns me by about 20 KTS.
    8 points
  11. Whoohoo! Wx cooperated today and I knocked out three full stop landings. Nerves got to me a little and my calls were hesitant on the first lap but I stayed on the flows and the last two laps were smooth. My cfi did a great drawing on my shirt piece and I can’t wait to get that framed. Now, the dream feels a lot closer to happening. p.s. I’m going to a party this weekend. How exactly do I go about telling everyone I’m a pilot?
    8 points
  12. I’m going to take a different view point - I drove an hour each way and lived with it. My situation was different. I recovered from heart failure and had to go through the SI process. Once I got my 3rd Class medical, I couldn’t wait to fly solo again. I pretty much fly every week as I know how quickly this privilege can disappear. I now have about a 40 minute drive each way and still find a way to fly weekly. I do have a nice hanger and even go down sometimes just to clean and look over things. VFR or IFR doesn’t matter, I fly and I train often too with a CFII/Safety Pilot. Always something to work on. I do WINGS, Pilot Workshop etc. every month. I train with the Garmin PC stimulator too. I want to fly that much… no more waiting till later, I have a plane and I know how to use it- mostly ;o) -Don
    8 points
  13. For the benefit of the community: - Was offered $235k by their insurance. I said no because of loss of value ($213k) + loss of use ($60k) + the pain of going thru this and them not being helpful or amicable or ethical. That’s me - I fight. Win or lose. - There is a video and it’s blatant they’re at fault. Kevin Kammer told me - there’s no way one sees that damage during pre-flight (eg it’s sheared from the top) - Gross negligence in FL means they willfully intended to cause harm. So they hide in legal verbiage to avoid liability. So the line man can run the fuel truck into your airplane and ????. Crazy. RECOs: 1. Check your lease agreement for negligence verbiage 2. If you can’t find an FBO w a negligence standard - I wouldn’t let them tow my Mooney 3. I’m angry - sad and embarrassed. I embrace my weakness and am ultimately happy I had my day in court against these evil folk. Win or lose that’s a win. tail winds!
    8 points
  14. Well after about 4 months we are done... My M20C had its heart transplant and I am now running an IO-360-A1B instead of a carburated O-360... which translates into a 20Hp more horsepower. The engine swap was more complicated than expected. Mainly because I had to procure many of the parts that were needed. I had to get a new electrical fuel pump, a new exhaust... But lets start: After getting the engine and reading the STC I realized that I needed a new cowling and engine mount, in addition to a new electrical fuel pump and throttle, mixture and prop cable. Not a problem. Ebay, McFarlane and Aircraft spruce got me everything. The work started and first hurdle: the side panel I had from my M20C did not fit with the new cowling... my AP worked around it and fixed it and made them fit. Then little issues came up that became huge problems, such as the cables don´t fit exacly as expected and we need to find a way to make them fit... Did I tell you that my AP is great? Next hurdle: Baffles... where can I get a new (used) set of baffles... The old dog house did not work... So I had to go out there and find used baffles. I was lucky and found a full set in ARGENTINA.... I was able to get them and had them shipped. Then, the STC states that you have to move the battery box to the back of the plane. Easier said than done. After looking at the cables my AP said that it would be better to change all the cables... So I ended up purchasing an insane amount of cables, connectors etc. But now I have a brand new electrical system (plus new alternator and regulator...). The only thing that is still not 100% is the RAM air door. The STC states that you can use the carb heat cable, but I am not convinced. So I decided to order from McFarlene the RAM air cable. I installed a set of GAMI injectors, new ignition coils too. In parallel I also changed my autopilot to a Garmin 507 and swapped my ASPENs for a G5 and ad G3X touch. Finally after learning how to start a flooded fuel injection engine, I flew the airplane this weekend. It is great! Did it make sense? in hindsite: No. The costs I incurred were absurd. It would have made much more sense to sell my M20C and buy a M20E. But then... you get attached to your machine... so would I do it again? after flying the plane... most likely: yes... Oscar
    8 points
  15. not really, bold is when it goes right. Stupid is when it doesn't.
    8 points
  16. No objectivity here. It's the one you own.
    7 points
  17. I was the near miss guy! I'm very happy that "F" found a new home. It showed promise. My own search came to an end 5 weeks ago with a 77 Mooney M20J from Huntington, WV. Two happy new to us Mooney owners.
    7 points
  18. I have the two rear windows installed and the rest trimmed and ready to go. Windshield unsurprisingly took the longest to get right. It actually was fairly close as it came from great lakes, I don't think anywhere required more than 1/2" removed. I got it to fit and then took a little more off all around so there is some "wiggle room", hopefully avoiding any pressure points. I have been attempting to glue the windows roughly in the "middle" such that the edges are not against the metal frame anywhere. I did all the trimming with a pneumatic cutoff wheel and die grinder, and a small handheld belt sander to finish. And finally some hand work with finer grit to leave a nice smooth edge. (Last pic is as the belt sander leaves it prior to hand finish) The masking tape worked well to keep sealant where I wanted during the gluing process. Once the window was held in place from inside, I would wipe the excess sealant that squeezed out and then carefully remove the tape leaving a nice little bead along the edge. Next up I think I'll glue in the windshield, followed by the two front side windows.
    7 points
  19. We've been to AirVenture every year since 1999 except Covid year when they didn't have it and last year. We've flown in with the Caravan a few times and they were all good experiences. Very professionally handled! For ease of entry and exit we fly into Madison and rent a car for the hour and fifteen minute drive to Oshkosh through beautiful farm country. We've rented the same house for all the years we've attended. I think the lead was originally gotten through the Tourist Bureau. If you buy a lifetime EAA Membership you get the perk of using the Oasis, an air-conditioned building on the front line that supplies free drinks, candy, ice cream, tables for sitting, and other goodies to members only. I wish I had known about it 20 years ago. I had purchased the lifetime membership a few years earlier, but only accidentally found out about the Oasis last year. Learn the Tram System, if you want to save yourself miles of walking. Traffic getting in in the morning is terrible, so plan accordingly. Some of the discounts could just about pay for your trip, if you were planning on buying stuff like avionics anyway. I saved thousands on Garmin products when I did my upgrade. They were giving great rebates when buying multiple products at the time. I think I got a 20% discount on my Jeppesen subscriptions last time there. A lot of great dinners or breakfasts from AOPA, SAFE, NAFI, and others. Hangars A, B, C, D are usually packed, and the Flymart has interesting products. Of course there's all the airplane exhibits. Anybody whose anybody in GA displays their products there. Then there are the many, many seminars given by leading experts in the industry. They're all listed in the EAA app that's updated yearly. And don't forget the daily airshows with top performers starting in the early afternoon and the night airshow a couple of nights during the week.. I miss MAPA and Mooney. We always had a great time meeting Mooney people and sitting around and talking. Not to be forgotten is the journey itself. Planning and executing a long cross country trip in our magic Mooney carpet is a good part of the adventure of AirVenture.
    7 points
  20. I don’t want to infringe any laws!
    7 points
  21. I think I might be confusing you. I apologize. AEROLaw at all times felt we could breach the GROSS negligence threshold. So that fact + my rule of life to fight evil whether is $.10 cents of $xxxx applies. As stated, that part is personal. But I am flying a Turbo fan, so there's the whole proof and pudding thing. LOL. $235k was repairs $50-$60k on loss of use was mechanical (e.g. receipts, mortgage etc...) $213k was expert witness. On the loss of value to an airplane with <20 hours on it. There were many many many more costs I incurred which did not claim. I was simply trying to get to zero. Hopefully I've explained the facts a little better for you. My ONLY aim here is to help the Mooney Community, not trying to win petty arguments of lean of peak or rich, I've got ZERO interest in that.
    7 points
  22. I sent out the first 100 Pre-201 Valuation Guides today. 52 pages including photos and almost 18,000 words geared toward the Pre-201 Mooney, the different models, the mods and upgrades and how to arrive at proper value when you tie it all together. It is FREE for Mooney owners. If you don't own but are thinking about buying, email me and I will get you info on what to do if you want one. I will follow up the Pre-201 Guide with an M20J Guide in a few weeks, followed by M20K sometime end of July and hopefully M/R/S by the end of the summer. Email is jimmy@gmaxamericanaircraft.com For owners, just need a tail number to plug into my database. Thanks a bunch! Jimmy
    6 points
  23. Probably more likely to explode over touch and goes, ROP v LOP, whether to lock the baggage hatch or not, or whether shock cooling is real or not.
    6 points
  24. It’s not often you see a one owner airplane of this vintage. The FAA records show that it was sold to this owner 46 years ago this month. To have it hangared in the same spot that many years is remarkable. Reading over the owner’s obituary, Dr. Ellis sounds like the type of person you’d want to buy an airplane from: not only was he a doctor and flight physician, but a CFI, angel flight pilot, musician, etc, etc. https://www.serenityantlers.com/obituary/Ed-Ellis There's only one post mentioning this airplane that I can find on Mooneyspace (refers to it as an F mistakenly):
    6 points
  25. Hi all A quick update. Have had lots of treatment and it is keeping me alive but not forever. Its getting harder each round of chemo. Im still flying baby and @Oldguy joined me a few months ago as my safety pilot and I was able to fly him over the white cliffs of dover. He adored this. Am self certified medically, as I lost my class 2 on diagnosis. My medical team is very happy with progress but as they said later in the year we will need to have some more difficult conversations. Husband Andrew is doing a sponsored swim to help one of the charities that is giving me emoitional support and also research on what I have. Basically in laymans terms there is a protein called P53 that stops cell reproduction going mad. The dna for that protein in my blood is ummm yes broken. Noone knows why it happens but it does. If they can find out why then there is a cure for this for all the others that come after me. If you would like to, please feel free to donte on Andrews justgiving page. https://www.justgiving.com/page/andrewswims4hcc Am currently busy planning one last big camping trip to the South of France in July, something I thought I would never do. Ill send pics when im there. Hope you are all well. Please if you want to pop over and see London and me at the same time, you are most welcome. very best regards Andrew ps MD Andreson knows all about me and said they were happy with what UCL in London are doing and they often exchange ideas about treatments for cancer.
    6 points
  26. A mooney is similar to the Meyers 200 in manufacture. I’m pretty familiar with the Meyers as I ran the plant that made them for 15 years. It was long before my tenure but there was a lot of records etc still there and even a couple of Employees that built them still working. For those that aren’t familiar the Meyers AKA Commander 200 was and may still be the fastest single engine NA airplane that had way more steel tubing than any Mooney, it’s sort of unusual as even though the majority were produced 50 or more years ago it’s never had an airframe AD. Aero Commander ceased production when it became clear that they could never recoup the cost of production, it took many, many hours to produce that steel cage and wing structure etc. These type of aircraft are sort of like Ferrari’s and other Supercars in that they are very intensive in labor, and there is just no way without a complete redesign to get those hours out of it. But you know even Cirrus that brought modern manufacturing to an airplane and greatly simplified them still has to get seven figures to make money, and even they aren’t making tons of it. I have a friend that was in on the Toyota airplane years ago, bottom line Toyota wanted badly to build a single engine piston airplane for the prestige, got real far into the development phase, ended the project not because they couldn’t, they ended it because they decided it would never make a profit. Honda built the Jet for Prestige, and I doubt they will ever break even even though the bizjet market as a whole has always been profitable. I’m afraid that the dream of the common man being able to buy a new “real” airplane is dead and has been for a long time. I put real in parenthesis because I just can’t get excited about a Rotax powered plastic airplane myself, I can’t consider them as “real” Every year that goes by our airplanes get older and most deteriorate, a few are well kept at ever increasing costs, but those are becoming unicorns. Every year there are fewer and fewer airworthy GA common man type of aircraft. If you have one, cherish and enjoy it because we might just be among the last Generation that can live the dream
    6 points
  27. I've tried it. I had a discussion long ago with aeronautical engineer and handling qualities consultant Roger Hoh who pointed out that not all airplanes wind up tighter and tighter and faster and faster until making a smoking hole in the ground. Spiral divergence is caused by the directional stability being greater than than the lateral stability. But the longitudinal stability can be a factor also. Normally a Mooney phughoid lasts about 2-1/2 cycles. If you get the airspeed right (trimmed to about maneuvering speed) and the airplane is well rigged, I've let a spiral start power off and watched it stabilize in about a 45-degree bank and get almost to redline before the nose started up and then it got almost to stall before the nose came back down and then did this another time and a half with lower amplitude each time until it finally stabilized at trim speed in a 45 degree descending turn. This was long ago in my 1978 M20J. I haven't tried it in my 94 J.
    6 points
  28. Thanks to those who helped. It seems the oil leak is the pushrod tube O-ring. Today, my mechanic came up to the avionics show with some UV dye and presto, the leak was found. The oil was running from the pushrod tube junction, down the head and pooling at the bottom of the rocker cover. Some was creeping up the gasket by osmosis, so it looked like the gasket was seeping
    6 points
  29. Took Mooney for family camping during airshow at OldWarden (EGTH) Followed by goodbye to Daks (DC3 and C47) on their way to Cherbourg "Then, it's a dogfight"
    6 points
  30. If I was you, on a long cross country like you did recently, I wouldn't mind an extra quart in there for peace of mind. It might buy you an extra minute or two before things seize if you are dumping oil for some reason. Also our engines are both air and oil cooled. But in normal use I would try to keep it at six when you start up for the day. Don't check it an hour or two after a flight. Wait until the next day or the next flight and see where it has settled. If you check it soon after, it might be a 1/2 to a full quart lower than it will be the next day. If you add a quart right after a flight, on the next flight you might just be blowing out oil that never should have been in there. Has the air oil separator and the lines going to and from it ever been cleaned? That would be where I would start. Cleaning it might lower some of the pressure that's blowing it out. Also cleaning the engine and cowling completely might reveal other oil leaks that could be handled with new gaskets.
    6 points
  31. He was absolutely correct in this statement. However, he should have also pointed out that there is a lot of WRONG information from maintainers. That's why we have to verify what anyone tells us. Good for you to delve into this.
    6 points
  32. When Mooney started making airplanes again in 2014 after shutting down production five years earlier, they offered an option of drilling a 7th hole on the seat rail. The option mentioned that it would be installed after the airworthiness license. It's the third from the bottom option on the picture below. It's not something I would try on my own for sure. If you feel like you need it I'd talk to the Factory Service Center to see if that's still something they do and find out if they had any difficulties with it once it was done. Keep in mind though that we have someone on the forum who is 6'8" who doesn't have the seat rail modification and flies his Mooney regularly. If your wife is taller than that I would look into getting her a WNBA contract [emoji4]. Then you could get a turboprop and she could sit in the back!
    6 points
  33. On the humorous side of all, I was performing a flight review with my instructor when this incident took place. With the gear collapse and safe landing outcome, someone took a photo of my instructor sitting on the ground with my log book on the wing, signing me off for excellent emergency procedures.
    6 points
  34. Do you have to yell, wtf is wrong with you. And try to type legible sentences also. It hurts to read shitposts like this
    5 points
  35. Found this "Investment Reports - provided by Newsweek" article online dated May 28, 2024. It is an interview with Jonny Pollack and seems to be current because Pollack says in the interview that he has been CEO of Mooney for four (4) years without taking a salary. https://www.investmentreports.co/interview/jonny-pollack-1180 Key Points: "We currently enjoy good margins manufacturing parts for several other aircraft companies: our main challenge is scaling up." 35 employees "I believe the future lies in composite technology, which allows for rapid production in molds" "Our plan includes refining existing models to build more efficiently and increase their useful load." Interestingly blames the Trump Administration trade wars for the inability of Soaring America (subsidiary of Meijing Group) to continue funding the business resulting in shut down of aircraft manufacturing. That means that Mooney remained a negative cashflow sinkhole with every Ultra that they built. Content Provider for Interviews Jonny Pollack Jonny Pollack CEO Mooney International 28 May 2024 You are an avid aviation enthusiast and have likened flying a Mooney aircraft to flying a Ferrari in the sky. What exactly makes the Mooney aircraft so unique? Mooney aircraft stand out due to their engineering excellence. Each Mooney is handcrafted, ensuring meticulous attention to detail and quality. In general aviation, trainer aircrafts use cables and pulleys, which delays response time, whereas we use pushrods, allowing immediate feedback to any control input. It's also extremely fast, holding general aviation speed records at 240 knots true airspeed at 25,000 feet in ideal conditions - the closest competitor is 8 or 9 knots slower. We use a turbocharged Continental IO550 engine and a laminar flow wing featuring a sturdy aluminium spar extending from tip to tip, which enhances its efficiency and safety. This design has been a staple in Mooney aircraft for over 70 years. You joined Mooney as CEO in 2020 following a turbulent few decades consisting of financial troubles and multiple changes of ownership. Why did you join what many people considered a company on the brink of collapse? I joined Mooney partly due to a personal connection to the brand and partly due to a vested interest given that I had previously purchased my own Mooney aircraft. For context, the previous owners - investment firm Soaring America - were impacted by trade wars under the Trump administration, could no longer fund operations, and had to cease production. Initially, I evaluated the company’s status and prospects, but driven by a sense of responsibility to our clients and the broader community relying on our aircraft, I ended up accepting the CEO position without a salary for four years. Mooney faces operational challenges, mainly supply chain issues that affect our parts availability. It’s my responsibility to stabilize our financials and preserve the company sufficiently so that eventually, new leadership can turn things around and Mooney can return to manufacturing aircraft in full. I consider my tenure as managing the company through crisis effectively, aiming to set a foundation for future success so we can transition away from being a parts manufacturer to resuming full aircraft manufacturing under the Mooney brand. As you focus on building a more solid foundation for Mooney, what economic uncertainties are keeping you awake at night? The aviation business presents challenges in building aircraft efficiently. The complexity arises from managing thousands of parts and adhering to stringent Part 23 certifications. Such certifications demand a rigorous quality control system where every component must meet precise standards. This requirement not only enhances safety but also significantly raises costs. Moreover, the dependency on a reliable supply chain has been a critical issue, especially post-Covid. The necessity for a robust infrastructure of engineers and quality assurance teams to comply with FAA regulations adds another layer of complexity. These factors combine to make aircraft manufacturing costly, with the net margin severely impacted by substantial overhead costs associated with maintaining the necessary quality controls. Tell us about Mooney’s portfolio and geographical spread of customers across the US and the world? We operate 7,000 aircraft worldwide, exclusively manufactured in the United States. Many are certified for international flights, such as in Australia and South Africa. We don't sell aircraft outside the U.S., yet interest has risen in our all-metal aircraft due to global warming concerns and structural integrity in extreme heat. Mooney aircraft, primarily aluminum, are known for efficiency and reduced fossil fuel consumption. In the U.S., our main clients are individual pilots. While our competitors focus on family-oriented marketing with safety features such as parachutes, our planes have a slightly lower useful load like the SR-22. Due to our aircraft’s payload limitations and narrower cockpits, we cater to that specific demographic. You have mentioned that Mooney operates like a startup but also uses 1970s technology. How do you plan to modernize the design and accelerate automation to keep Mooney competitive in 2024? We will be modernizing both our manufacturing methods and the products themselves. Currently, we produce metal aircraft using traditional methods such as stamping and forming but I believe the future lies in composite technology, which allows for rapid production in molds—however, this method involves significant certification costs and time. All planes fundamentally use technology developed from the early days of aviation, with recent changes focusing on propulsion methods like VTOL and hybrid engines. Our plan includes refining existing models to build more efficiently and increase their useful load. Do you have a projected timeline for when Mooney might become revenue-neutral or cash-positive and begin a transition? We currently enjoy good margins manufacturing parts for several other aircraft companies; our main challenge is scaling up. Unlike Cessna, which services thousands of trainers, our fleet consists of only 7,000 aircraft. Once we have acquired the necessary capital, I anticipate we could be revenue-neutral within a year. At that point, I'd likely step aside to let new leadership drive further growth. Given the intense competition, why have you opted to keep Mooney in Texas and not outsource for cheaper manufacturing labor? Mooney's identity is deeply ingrained in Texas; it's part of our legacy. Our commitment remains strong due to significant incentives to retain manufacturing operations locally. Although our team size is smaller than ideal—35 instead of 235—our team embodies the spirit and dedication Mooney stands for. Licensing production overseas would involve complex and costly certification processes in those countries. We prefer to build kits in Texas and ship them abroad for assembly under strict regulations, maintaining our quality standards and supporting our local community. JoeBen Bevirt Joby Aviation 28 May 2024 Thomas Olivier Omnos 28 May 2024 71-75 Shelton Street, Covent Garden, London WC2H 9JQ, UK info@investmentreports.co +40 740 631 208 Investment Reports © 2024 All rights Reserved
    5 points
  36. I feel this way with just about every thread on Mooneyspace....
    5 points
  37. Any chance the GTX was powered up with the antenna disconnected? Running the GTX without the antenna (or a dummy load) connected can damage the power stage because it transmits Mode S acquisition squitter pulses once a second even if not receiving ground radar interrogations and with no antenna all the energy gets reflected back into the transmitter. This problem most often occurs during maintenance when a belly panel is removed and the antenna is then disconnected. My installer put a label on the coax at the antenna end reminding to pull the GTX circuit breaker if the antenna is disconnected. There is a caution about this in the GTX maintenance manual.
    5 points
  38. In addition to what others said about reducing the G in the pullup after rolling level, there are two other reasons to push forward and reduce the G load prior to rolling level. First, the airplane (any airplane?) rolls much better with less G load, second, while not published, the rolling G structural limit is generally much less than the published “straight pull” limit. Even in something tame like a Citabria or C-152, you can put a couple Gs on it and see the reduced roll capability. Most aerobatic aircraft have a rolling G limit too. None of this means you need to completely unload and throw everything off the floor, but a quick unload/power reduction, roll level, then feed the g back in gently to get the nose back up works best.
    5 points
  39. Mooney over Mars? Taken two weeks ago between Cortez, Colorado, and Moab, Utah, at 12,500 ft on a flight from Los Alamos (LAM) to South Valley Regional (U42) just south of SLC. Looking west, showing where the Colorado River has dissected the Colorado Plateau. If you enlarge it, the blue patch in at the right-edge of the photo is the potash mine on the bank of the Colorado River just west of Moab. I flew a total of 25 hours on this trip!
    5 points
  40. I believe you are getting shafted also. I would make one attempt of sitting down with the owner and calmly presenting your concerns. Calmly and confidently tell him what you think is fair for both of you (maybe split the extra labor?). At this point I wouldn't go further than that or they'll hold your airplane hostage. Get it signed off and get it out of there and don't go back. (Also just a point of reference I keep my logbooks locked up and shops that work on my airplane get a .pdf of my logs, if they request them. I ask for stickers that I'll put in my logs. The shop never has possession of my logs.) Education always carries with it tuition. Your education here is never go back. Once it's done please share the name of the shop so someone else doesn't sign up for that course also.
    5 points
  41. My wife took this picture several years ago on my first approach in actual after I passed my check ride. We were coming back home from Myrtle Beach and had to shoot the RNAV approach. I still remember how happy I was when those PAPI's showed up.
    5 points
  42. When ever I see a dog eat its own vomit, I think of the air/oil separator.
    5 points
  43. The OPP regulation is a very valuable path for owners like us in this situation. There is quite a bit of latitude on the "production" of said parts, and the owner does NOT have to literally make the part themselves. They only have to be involved with the specification and direction of the production, and only install them on their own plane. (ie don't make and sell them to get around PMA rules!) The specification can be as simple as "duplicate an existing part using the same materials and dimensions," and that is perfectly proper. In this case, the machinist friend can make a batch of them without worry and distribute to individuals. I would very much like to buy a set as well if you and the friend are willing. If he makes a batch, the price could be lower for everyone. If you want to create a paper trail, you could have anyone interested complete a simple form to create the specification and then everything is above-board. (This is how companies like MacFarlane handle making duplicate engine control cables or similar where they do not have a PMA!) If you need a scrap version for destructive test, I'd suggest talking to Maxwell or Top Gun or similar and see if they have any in their box of misc hardware that is used for show-n-tell.
    5 points
  44. What a pleasant time I had listening to all the details from the man himself. He is a new owner of a Mooney and took great care to tell me what an amazing plane it is. The plane had been flown 30-40 hrs / year for the last several years. He purchased the plane a few weeks ago and was getting instruction for his insurance. The engine is an IO360 with approximately 1000 hrs on it. He was flying with an instructor at approximately 3500 ft when the engine seized without warning. It is locked up. The propeller did not windmill at all. They found a nice place to set it down in a farmers field and there it sets. It is unharmed in any way except for the seized engine. They are waiting for it to dry out before pulling the engine.
    5 points
  45. When I first started flying long cross countries, I picked airports with the cheapest fuel for fuel stops. After a few issues, I now choose airports with 1) maintenance facilities, 2) commercial airline service, and 3) nearby restaurants, hotels, and Uber/Lyft service. It's insurance for both aircraft maintenance issues and weather. Being stuck on the ground on a Sunday in the middle of nowhere with nobody staffing the FBO can really interrupt your trip. And I've had to use the airlines to get home once. For where you're going, fuel stops that meet those requirements would include Garden City, KS (KGCK), Liberal, KS (KLBL), Tulsa, OK (KTUL), Springfield, Missouri (KSGF), Little Rock, AR (KLIT), Montgomery, AL (KMGM), Tallahassee, FL (KTLH). I'd try to pick my way from one of those to another based on the weather that day, and be flexible about it. Any of them also makes a pretty good overnight stop if you need or want to break it into two days. Florida's airspace around Miami and Tampa is always a challenge. It's very busy and the controllers don't like dealing with slow piston aircraft. Their preferred method of dealing with you is to route you 20 NM offshore at 4,000 feet, which feels uncomfortable in a single engine. You will want to either stay VFR and outside the class Bravo as long as possible, or file IFR and try your very best to sound like a professional airline pilot on the radio and hope they work you in. It helps if you file an arrival procedure in your flight plan, in my experience. They'll usually give it to you and let you fly it. Good luck and have fun.
    5 points
  46. I have built a good relationship with my AP/IA. I'll talk to him about a problem or upgrade and often he will say "that's in your wheelhouse" and provide instruction, oversight, etc... The first avionics I did was replacing the transponder. It was an easy one as I had the harness pre-made. The next job was the big one. I put in two G5's, a GNC355, upgraded the EDM830 to an EDM900, CiES fuel senders, and a PMA450B audio panel. There were a few moments where I thought "I wonder how much it will cost to have someone fix all this if it doesn't work." I went slow, double and triple checked everything as I went, and it all worked. I think I was down for 2-3 weeks which is much better than the 6 months my friend's plane was down for a similar avionics upgrade.
    5 points
  47. This is what comes to mind when I think of an Airplane Hanger Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    5 points
  48. Several of the replies above imply that the action of carefully sumping your tanks would have prevented the issue. While it's obviously good practice to remove free water, there is ALWAYS some soluble water in Avgas. Water solubility changes with fuel temperature, and the warmer the fuel the higher the dissolved water content. Dissolved water will not appear in the sump, and is distributed throughout the fuel tank. As you climb into low temperature conditions, the fuel in your tanks cools. If sufficiently cold, the dissolved water comes out of solution and forms very fine ice crystal suspension that can collect in, and eventually bind, the fuel screen/filter. If you're lucky, these crystals will melt as you descend into higher ambient temperature, as I suspect was the case for JM. IPA, even in the form of Red Label HEET, is the most effective preventative measure for our Mooneys if you plan to fly into relative extreme cold conditions.
    5 points
  49. Ask and you shall receive: https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/d66liah32wn929ez27huj/Engine-Shim-Maxwell-MAPA-June-2001.pdf?rlkey=lnoub816hzmjh0kpnrjfyb1ny&dl=0
    5 points
  50. Problem solved drilled out the stripped nut plate rivets from the wheel well side and pulled a new nut plate in through the nearest inspection hole (three feet from the mounting spot for the new nut plate) behind the rear rib/spar.
    5 points
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