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  1. Here's what me and Mrs. OTreeLemur did last weekend. When we bought our J in late '22, I thought the tail number looked naked. We fixed that. It was a long, fun weekend!
    13 points
  2. Simple rule of thumb: O-360: Turn key, go fly. IO-360: Carefully read POH and 4000+ pages on Mooneyspace about starting procedures. Analyze, implement and discard. Go to bar, come out the next day and do the cold start procedure.
    13 points
  3. Took our new Japanese exchange student for her first small airplane flight. We picked up @JRo at Harvey Field (S43) and flew to Bremerton KPWT for lunch at Amelia’s
    10 points
  4. +1 on the above. If I was selling I wouldn't allow that, especially on a high-ish time engine. I'll also suggest that if the purchase price is near your limit, if you don't have sufficient resources to do an overhaul or major work soon, you'll probably want to find something else.
    9 points
  5. Regarding pulling a cylinder. You are willing to purchase a plane with an at or near tbo engine. You already know there will be wear on the tappets and cam lobes and you already know you will be replacing and overhauling soon. You already have a discounted sales price for this I assume. If I were the owner I would not agree to this after fully disclosing all known engine conditions anyway. All kinds of new issues could be introduced for no reasons not previou$ly mitigated by price You need to focus on the quality of the airframe and corrosion condition. If acceptable go for it knowing your going to have to spend the big bucks on the engine soon. If the tanks haven't been resealed in 20 years, they will need it coming up. That sealant, like bladders, don't last forever Have someone who knows how to pre purchase inspect a Mooney do a proper pre buy, you will get your value there. The Internet opinions are for us old armchair quarterbacks to enjoy reading
    9 points
  6. I was at FL250 and ATC told Delta to look for a Mooney passing 2K above them. They were confused a bit.
    9 points
  7. Recent flight with some friends for a lot of flying fun!
    9 points
  8. Option one will never happen. Your lender will insist on being paid in full if the airplane is a total loss. They sell loans in a package and couldn't sell that one without adequate coverage. Also if you disclose that you fly it for business your rates will be much higher than you were quoted. If you don't disclose that you may not be covered. People who fly single engine airplanes who have to be somewhere on schedule tend to become victims of got-to-get-there-itis and fly in situations where they shouldn't. The accident records bear that out. I would really re-think option two. The reason insurance rates are so high for new pilots and those new in-type is not some random reason. These categories of pilots bend up and total the airplane at an exponentially higher rate. That's just the hull portion of the policy. If your company has any sense they will demand that you carry enough liability to protect them. In addition to that you are exposing your survivors to your estate being sued and having no insurance company to defend those suits. What if you just lose an engine, land it in a field and walk away without a scratch? Without hull coverage, it will still cost you perhaps $50,000 to take it apart and get it out of someone else's property and hauled to a shop. Plus any damage to their property. Any guess what a field of corn is worth? You will then be paying out of pocket to repair the airplane and then still be paying off your HELOC. Or worst case you total it and still owe $200,000 on the HELOC. Not a good situation. We all should have coverage not only for ourselves for innocent victims who fly with us or those on the ground. You would be at the very top of that list that needs coverage. I wouldn't let reimbursement factor into your decision even 1%. What if next week they decide you don't need to travel or they have downsized and eliminated your position. If you are in a position to purchase, hangar, maintain, upgrade and insure an airplane without any reimbursement then get your Private license and work on your IFR rating while considering it.
    8 points
  9. She is under heavy medication after her stem cell transplant to prevent the new immune system from rejecting my wife. Also she has to take prophylactic chemo therapy to prevent the cancer from coming back. And so on. I am happy that she is alive and still with me[emoji1317]. It’s complicated and a different life than before but that’s okay… Gesendet von iPhone mit Tapatalk
    8 points
  10. My opinion is that it is unreasonable to ask for an invasive inspection when an aircraft is in service with a reasonable useage history. Especially in the case of an engine at 1850hrs. It should be priced as run out. If it runs longer (and it likely will), great. The only time I think it is reasonably to ask for a cylinder removal is under very special circumstances where both parties are very engaged but have reached an impasse. For instance a low time engine that is not in service and has not been for an extended period. Even in that situation it’s reasonable for the seller to refuse. It also reasonable for the buyer to pass.
    8 points
  11. So this weekend, the weather told me that if I didn't get out and fly, I was an idiot. Sooo, I changed the oil and went flying. I've wanted to try this for sometime now, and since I was alone, I thought why not. I took off, and started climbing up to see just how high up the plane would get me. I did fill all the way up, so was not super light. I climbed between 800-1100 fpm up to about 12,500, and then to keep temps down, and my speed around 110 mph I reduced my climb to about 500 fpm. at about 15,500 I was climbing around 2-300fpm. at around 17, it was getting very hard to keep the engine happy, so I stopped at 17,500 to see what I could get my cruise speed up to. I trued out around 148 mph :(. I was hoping to see a little more up there, but oh well. One thing that surprised me though, and why I am posting this. I thought I would end up getting to a point where my AoA started getting to high, and I would lose too much speed to keep altitude, but rather, my engine was my limiting factor. In that I could no longer properly set the mixture. If I leaned any further from where I was, I could VERY noticeably feel the plane slowing down, and the engine would struggle to maintain RPM. If I richened any more, and I mean within two twists of the knob, the engine would again start stuttering/bogging? down. Hard to explain. Felt like it was loading up. My EGT's also were not consistent at all, with number 4 getting very cold down in to the 900's. I know being NA is going to be a factor, but I thought I could still control the mixture enough to keep the engine somewhat happy? Also, once I sped up to max speed, I am sure I could have climbed further and get in to Class A, but I called it off early. Was I doing something wrong? Just normal limitation of literally being at half atmosphere? Due to old age? lol. Plane, not me of course hehe. Only pic I took inside:
    8 points
  12. A few of the local southern California mountains today after the last storm
    8 points
  13. Sometimes you’ve just got to take the old bird up to 15,500’ for the fun of it! 17.3” mp (ram air on), but still managed 142kts. G5 oxygen concentrator kept the pulse ox at 98%.
    8 points
  14. Hello all: 1996 Ovation Refurbish: Trying to take care of as much as is possible while I was waiting for the motor to be built and also the Winter in the Midwest. The factory new IO 550G just arrived from Continental which is exciting. The firewall forward will all be new or overhauled. Continental says they run them on the test stand between 30 minutes and one hour and thirty minutes which is reassuring . The entire exhaust has also been completely rebuilt….as new. Soon: Propeller and Governor overhaul will be complete. 3 Blade McCauley w/ de-ice. Fiberglass Air Intake rebuild will be complete. What a piece of junk. Baffles overhauled and painted. Spinner is being refurbished to remove some small dings and then polished instead of re-painted. Found a custom upholstery shop to do the interior. Seats start next week. Doing a cockpit mockup after that. Carpet is surplus wool from the Porsche Caymen. Leather and carpet samples are out for burn certificates. Seat foam from Aircraft Spruce. Exterior lights LED conversion is complete. Whelen. All LED now except the small white lights on the trailing edge of the wingtip and the Ice Light. New lenses on the tips and for the Taxi/ Landing lights too. Added 8 lbs to the useful load. Early March: New Gear Donuts New tires and tubes. New O2 Bottle Hoping for the test flight, avionics software updates and IFR certification middle of March. Thanks again to all here for their advice along the way. I have taken quite a few notes and learned a lot on the forum.
    8 points
  15. The benefit to be gained is the full picture of what took place. One cannot simply divorce the pilot from the outcome. Pilots are way more than just a few links in the accident chain that lead up to an incident. I don't need to know everything about every incident, but when it bears looking into, it bears looking into. Again, it is not out of malice. I also appreciate seeing how these airframes fair in all manner of crash scenarios. I deeply appreciate the many times I have seen a Mooney with bent and crumpled extremities surrounding a well intact steel cabin structure. Perhaps gear ups are different and there is nothing to learn from seeing them or probing a little deeper into the back story. I personally think that all public incidents are fair to examine, but not all are interesting enough to warrant it. As to your story with an instructor on board, there but by the grace of god go I... I have done some boneheaded things with instructors on board and I've seen high time pilots do dumb things when they are being critiqued. I was once riding shotgun with a 6000hr ATP in a Baron who was getting back into GA airplanes (I am not a CFI, just flying with a friend). There was ILS traffic that prompted tower to ask us to extend downwind, between that, talking to tower, talking to me and looking for traffic, he failed to drop the gear as he normally would. I waited until we were on about 2 mile final and then casually said "this looks like as good a place as any to drop the gear". He went white and mumbled some sort of excuse. He later owned it and thanked me catching it. I explained that he probably would have caught it before TD. I knew how he felt and described how I had once made it to short final with the gear still up. I think that the pilots who gear up feel personal shame after the incident. I think the pilots reading about it feel both empathy and sympathy. If they don't, it's likely they don't have enough flight time to have witnessed their own shortcomings.
    7 points
  16. One thing not mentioned, or may have been but was embedded within a reply, is that aircraft owners need to have the stomach for unforeseen, expensive repairs. Just last year, my 83 J needed the landing gear relay replaced, both tanks resealed and exhaust valves lapped. All told, the repairs came out to $23k. While this was not a "typical" year, there have been other unexpected, expensive repairs along the way. So if you don't have the ability to tolerate these unforeseen (but inevitable) situations, then I recommend that you stay away or take on partners. Other than that, aircraft ownership is a great privilege and experience. Just my 2¢
    7 points
  17. Helicopter flight: "A bunch of spare parts flying in close formation." "Anything that screws its way into the sky flies according to unnatural principals." You never want to sneak up behind an old high-time helicopter pilot and clap your hands. He will instantly dive for cover and most likely whimper...then get up and smack the crap out of you. There are no old helicopters laying around airports like you see old airplanes. There is a reason for this. Come to think of it, there are not many old high-time helicopter pilots hanging around airports either so the first issue is mute. You can always tell a helicopter pilot in anything moving: a train, an airplane, a car or a boat. They never smile, they are always listening to the machine and they always hear something they think is not right. Helicopter pilots fly in a mode of intensity, actually more like "spring loaded" while waiting for pieces of their ship to fall off. Flying a helicopter at any altitude over 500 feet is considered reckless and should be avoided. Flying a helicopter at any altitude or condition that precludes a landing in less than 20 seconds is considered outright foolhardy. Remember in a helicopter you have about one second to lower the collective in an engine failure before the craft becomes unrecoverable. Once you've failed this maneuver the machine flies about as well as a 2 ton meat locker. Even a perfectly executed autorotation only gives you a glide ratio slightly better than that of a brick. A corollary to this: H-53 Pilots are taught autorotation procedures so that they will have something to do with their hands and feet while they plummet to the death. When your wings are leading, lagging, flapping, precessing and moving faster than your fuselage there's something unnatural going on. Is this the way men were meant to fly? While hovering, if you start to sink a bit, you pull up on the collective while twisting the throttle, push with your left foot (more torque) and move the stick left (more translating tendency) to hold your spot. If you now need to stop rising, you do the opposite in that order. Sometimes in wind you do this many times each second. Great fun is letting a fighter pilot go for a ride and try this. Yes it is! For Helicopters: You never want to feel a sinking feeling in your gut (low "g" pushover) while flying a two bladed under slung teetering rotor system. You are about to do a snap-roll to the right and crash. For that matter, any remotely aerobatic maneuver should be avoided in a Huey. Don't push your luck. It will run out soon enough anyway. If everything is working fine on your helicopter consider yourself temporarily lucky. Something is about to break. There are two types of helicopter pilots: Those that have crashed, and those that are going to. Harry Reasoner once wrote the following about helicopter pilots: "The thing is, helicopters are different from planes. An airplane by its nature wants to fly, and if not interfered with too strongly by unusual events or by an incompetent pilot, it will fly. A helicopter does not want to fly. It is maintained in the air by a variety of forces and controls working in opposition to each other, and if there is any disturbance in this delicate balance the helicopter stops flying; immediately and disastrously. There is no such thing as a gliding helicopter. This is why being a helicopter pilot is so different from being an airplane pilot, and why in generality, airplane pilots are open, clear-eyed, buoyant extroverts and helicopter pilots are brooding introspective anticipators of trouble. They know if something bad has not happened it is about to." Having said all this, I must admit that flying in a helicopter is one of the most satisfying and exhilarating experiences I have ever enjoyed: skimming over the tops of trees at 100 knots is something we should all be able to do at least once.
    7 points
  18. I think most of us try to avoid writing anything down OP's chart is mildly terrifying, not because of the numbers but because they're all in one place. We have to compartmentalize to keep this hobby.
    7 points
  19. It's much easier from a studio. runs away...
    7 points
  20. One must be able to understand labor, overhead, and business financials.
    7 points
  21. Folks, I recently won a field approval to install a B & C standby alternator for my 1981 M20K (231) late last year. I just completed the installation and, though I have only flown once with it, it works as advertised. The 20 amp alternator mounts to the empty vacuum pad on the back of my TSIO-360-LB1B. I am very happy about this because of all things on my airplane, the gear driven alternator - with its finicky coupling - is the weak link. I started this process right here where someone pointed me to an existing field approval for a slightly different airplane - one with the -MB engine. I got a copy of that 337 and called the installer at LASAR and he gave me a rundown on the install and the process to obtain the field approval. I then emailed a copy to my mechanic and enlisted his help - he was willing. I then emailed my FSDO’s Principal Avionics Inspector who seemed immediately positive about the prospect of a field approval. The inspector had me edit the 337 form here and there, and had me draft an AFM Supplement. I think the FSDO was so easy to work with primarily because the B & C system is such a well-known quantity. TJ at B & C was an excellent resource and helped me immensely with technical questions along the way. B & C has its own technical publication section available on its website that was very helpful as well, with line-drawings and installation instructions for the PA-32 and the Bonanza. If anyone wants help, I have compiled quite a trove of documents I used to prove that the install would 1) work on my airframe, 2) work on my electrical system. Ethan
    7 points
  22. My son and I just started the journey of updating the panel on my 1970 C! I'm super excited to do this with him as he has been working for the last 18 months at my local airport as an apprentice to gain his A&P cert. We're both going to learn a lot. His boss, the local IA, has agreed to oversee, and sign off on the project. Going in: Dual G5's GNC255A GMA345 GI106A (backup-only for Nav2) JPI900 Cies fuel senders Aera 760 Going Out: Vac system Century HSI Intercom Original Engine gauges KI214 KX175B The KX165, the STEC30 and the GNX375 will stay. The pics will give you all an idea of where the panel was, where it's at, and where it's headed. This is the progress we made just this past weekend. Best, Tcal
    6 points
  23. I’m about to board a MAX9 without a parachute. It was nice knowing you all.
    6 points
  24. Back to the OP's question. The two or three times I got myself in *big* trouble (things that could have ended up really bad) over the ~1200 hours I have flown were every single one of them at the end of a long day, under pressure to get home. Think wanting to get home for Thanksgiving dinner, after a day working somewhere 400 miles away, and taking off in freezing rain over one of the Great Lakes, hoping to get ahead of a snowstorm. Or, after a full day of skiing, landing to refuel with what I discovered were 2 gallons of fuel on board. At that time I was thinking I have over one hour's worth of fuel, and was debating whether to proceed to my home airport without refueling, 15 minutes away. This one at night over hilly terrain. The more you fly the more cautious you get. I live in the Midwest just like you, and as a 1200 hours private pilot who has had an instrument rating for close to 20 years I would be very hesitant to think of using my plane for regular commuting the way you want to. Even with an IR, the weather in the Midwest will be trouble frequently -- thunderstorms in the summer and icing in the winter. My job is reasonably flexible, and nevertheless probably one out of every three or four trips I took for work with my plane ended up with me returning by commercial flight and having to go back to fetch the plane later. Not fun. When I was younger and much more gung-ho I used to think of my plane as a mode of transportation. I still think of it that way when I plan a vacation where nothing happens if I have to wait somewhere for a day or two. But work is a completely different animal. You tell yourself that you'll book a commercial flight three days in advance if the weather does not look good. What will actually happen is that the weather will look ok-ish three days out (or look that way to you because you want to fly yourself, and boy are we good at deceiving ourselves). When the weather looks marginal on the day of your flight the go/no-go decision will be much much less clear cut than you think, and it only takes one time to get in trouble. Just my two cents.
    6 points
  25. I’m thinking vacuum pumps and gyros will come back into style. That’s why I’m holding out.
    6 points
  26. Yes it does. As soon as I get more photo storage, I’ll post some more pictures (donation sent to Craig) This is incredible to see such an early Mooney M20 after all the newer ones I’ve worked on. The history of the build is neat to see first hand. David
    6 points
  27. Who are the idiots to which you are referring? This site is full of individuals with differing opinions. I’ve come across a lot of statements with which I staunchly disagree, but I’ve encountered very few idiots here. It’s not a term I use lightly. The vast majority of the forum members base their opinions on publications they’ve read, the data in the publication used to support the statements made and the ability to reproduce similar outcomes in the field. Trust in an institution is built or destroyed incrementally over time. Lycoming has not always put their best foot forward. I’m old enough to remember Lycoming’s “experts are everywhere memo” that used to be located at the address below on Lycoming’s website (the link below is long since dead): https://www.lycoming.com/support/troubleshooting/resources/SSP700A.pdf It did not name names, but was an obvious direct shot at GAMI, APS and other heretics in the industry. I was actually embarrassed for the author as I read it. Given that it was likely written by an engineer at Lycoming, I rationalized what I was reading by imagining that the legal department held a gun to his head while he was typing. It was indeed idiotic to anyone with an understanding of how mixture works. I think it’s important to take a manufacture’s recommendations seriously. I also understand that in a small, highly regulated and highly litigious market there is very little incentive to course correct on past statements. Given how slow the manufactures are to move, there has been sort of a small cottage industry of companies that have helped take GA into more modern and data driven operations. Lycoming facetiously called them “experts”. Those small companies and their executives have dramatically changed how much information and understanding the general pilot population has about combustion science and applied power plant operations, among other accomplishments. What is mostly mainstream now was controversial at Lycoming in the early aughts which is why the memo was released. At some point Lycoming realized how bad it had aged as it was removed. The Part number SSP700A is no longer available on the website. George Brawly having a sense of humor posed for the attached pic in front of a Lycoming trade show booth. I’ve updated it just for you. Back to shock cooling or sudden cooling or whatever you want to call it. Perhaps it is real, but no one with the ability to do so has been able to generate data to support its detrimental effects. The “Idiots” that have stated that shock cooling is or probably is a myth include but are not limited to: George Braly John Deakin (RIP) Walter Atkinson (RIP) Rick Durden Mike Busch and many others…
    6 points
  28. The whole shock cooling was debunked when someone actually instrumented an engine. The highest cooling rate comes when you shut the engine down. And the heating rate is highest on engine start.
    6 points
  29. At first when I saw this thread I thought Time Warner Cable (TWC) had Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) But I think this is the product they are referring to: https://www.edmo.com/product/12V3AH/Integrated-Battery-Back-up-System-IBBS-12V-3AH (Of course come to think of it, in dealing with TWC customer service over the years, IBS might explain a lot.)
    6 points
  30. RE AoA - no problem with the Mooney wing up high. Flew at FL210 this week for a long round trip. On two occasions had ATC point out A320s 1,000 feet below me. You could hear the surprise in the first pilot’s voice when the Mooney traffic above him was called out… I considered cautioning him for my wake turbulence but my better judgement prevailed…
    6 points
  31. I’m going to say about 6 hours. First time I’ve done this job and didn’t have all the tools I should have. Thank goodness for tape to make a longer punch out of a punch and extension. I also didn’t have any help during the disassembly. Engine hoist and saw horses were most useful to get it in to three pieces. Brought the wing and fuselage section home today on a 36 foot long trailer. Not especially fun going through Chicago to UGN. Airplane was in Gary Indiana. Wisconsin might have been less stressful than going down 94/294. Got some strange looks!
    6 points
  32. Wasn’t planning on becoming a Mooney owner again, but today I finished the disassembly and pick up of a 1956 M20. Looks to be in pretty good shape so intentions are to bring it back to flying condition. Don H is going to post a couple of pictures as I don’t have any more space to post them.
    6 points
  33. Everybody keeps talking about making it out of better material. It seems the material they have been made out of holds up pretty well. The easiest way to get a PMA would be to build an exact duplicate of the current design using the current material. The PMA process specifically allows that.
    6 points
  34. This is the kind of thing that gets me in trouble all the time. Being an engineer, I think I understand stuff. The latest manual says it damages the 406 MHz transmitter. Maybe it's because the rubber duckies are tuned for the VHF communications band. Someone who really cares could call ACK and ask them. But this is Mooneyspace, so I expect that there will be several pages of speculation plus a few pages of posts about how this is a terrible design and then a few outraged folks that think they should all be recalled.
    6 points
  35. I just uploaded a file to the Airframe Manuals area called "Mooney lubrication notes.docx" that has a synopsis of the various lubricants indicated in the M20J maintenance manual, as well as current products that are compliant. I can never remember what to use where, so I made this so that I didn't get any more confused than usual. There was probably an earlier version that I uploaded previously but it may have gotten lost in one of the various server migrations/purges/respawns. Once that doc gets approved it should be available. Edit: It's not that much text, so I figured I could just copy it here as well. The Greek letters and symbols used in the manual didn't copy.: Mooney lubrication notes, by eaj, 8/22/2020, updated 4/19/2022. See M20J SMM Section 5-20-7 P 18-20. Order: Lube items, manual symbol, specification, compliant products. Landing Gear Zerks, W, MIL-G-81322, superceded by MIL-PRF-81322. Mobil Grease 28 or Aeroshell 22 Rod ends, y, Teflon (PTFE), Tri-Flow specified. Bellcranks, u-joints, bungee/spring attachments, flap indicator cable, fuel selector valve, baggage and cabin door hinges, control surface hinges, S, MIL-L-7870, superceded by MIL-PRF-7870C (or latest). Low-temp general purpose light oil. Suggested is 3-in-1, LPS 2. Stabilizer trim jackscrew/actuator, chain and gear, j, specified Aeroshell 7 Wheel Bearings, Y, MIL-L-3545, superceded by MIL-PRF-81322G (or latest), Aeroshell 22 or Mobil SHC 100 Control rod guide blocks, D, MIL-G-23827 or MIL-G-3278, superceded by MIL-PRF-23827, Aeroshell 7 or Aeroshell 33 (NOTE: Aeroshell 7 and Aeroshell 33 are not compatible with each other, do not mix.) Gear or flap actuator gear box, W, MIL-G-81322 superceded by MIL-PRF-81322, Aeroshell 22 or Mobil SHC 100 NOTE: SBM20-190B for Dukes/ITT gear actuator gearbox indicates Aeroshell 7, or MIL-PRF-23827 with 10% by vol molybdenum disfulfide. Aeroshell 64 contains molybdenum disulfide and can be used. Gear or flap actuator Ball screw, ë, specified Lubriplate 630AA Door latches, , Door Ease Stick Lubricant Note: Aeroshell 22 covers most grease requirements, and cannot be mixed with Aeroshell 5 Note: Aeroshell 7 (trim, guide blocks), and Lubriplate 630AA (ball screws) covers the rest of the grease requirements. Note: Hartzell propeller is Aeroshell 5 (preferred) or 6. 1 oz (6 pumps), stop if comes out the engine side fitting. Torque: Spark Plug Installation Guidelines 1. Spark plug gap must be set at 0.016 to 0.022 in. (0.40 to 0.60 mm). 2. Always install a spark plug with a new gasket (P/N STD-295). 3. Use a copper-based anti-seize compound or engine oil on spark plug threads starting two full threads from the electrode, but DO NOT use a graphite-based compound. 4. Use installation torque values shown in Table 1. 420 in-lbs, (35 ft-lbs) Injector torque: 60 in-lbs Magneto torque: 17 ft-lbs, 204 in-lbs, per Lycoming SI-1508C Gascolator filter: 15-20 in lbs. Sorted by lubricant type for application efficiency: Aeroshell 6: Note: Hartzell propeller is Aeroshell 5 (preferred) or 6. 1 oz (6 pumps), stop if comes out the engine side fitting. Remove cylinder-side fitting, pump into engine-side fitting for each blade. Aeroshell 7: Stabilizer trim jackscrew/actuator, chain and gear, j, specified Aeroshell 7 Control rod guide blocks, D, MIL-G-23827 or MIL-G-3278, superceded by MIL-PRF-23827, Aeroshell 7 or Aeroshell 33 (NOTE: Aeroshell 7 and Aeroshell 33 are not compatible with each other, do not mix.) Aeroshell 22: Landing Gear Zerks, W, MIL-G-81322, superceded by MIL-PRF-81322. Mobil Grease 28 or Aeroshell 22 Wheel Bearings, Y, MIL-L-3545, superceded by MIL-PRF-81322G (or latest), Aeroshell 22 or Mobil SHC 100 Gear or flap actuator gear box, W, MIL-G-81322 superceded by MIL-PRF-81322, Aeroshell 22 or Mobil SHC 100 Tri-Flow: Rod ends, y, Teflon (PTFE), Tri-Flow specified. “Light oil” Bellcranks, u-joints, bungee/spring attachments, flap indicator cable, fuel selector valve, baggage and cabin door hinges, control surface hinges, S, MIL-L-7870, superceded by MIL-PRF-7870C (or latest). Low-temp general purpose light oil. Suggested is 3-in-1, LPS 2. Lubriplate: Gear or flap actuator Ball screw, ë, specified Lubriplate 630AA Door latches, , Door Ease Stick Lubricant Aeroshell 64 or Aeroshell 7 w/moly: NOTE: SBM20-190B for Dukes/ITT gear actuator gearbox indicates Aeroshell 7, or MIL-PRF-23827 with 10% by vol molybdenum disfulfide. Aeroshell 64 contains molybdenum disulfide and can be used. Remove bottom bolt when injecting grease in gearbox.
    6 points
  36. MooneyMax 2024 dates September 5,6,7,8 Location will be Fredericksburg, Texas at The Hangar Hotel. More details to come shortly.
    6 points
  37. There is lots of good info here which is provided by some sharp people but please allow me to add my two cents from personal experience. I started studying the system after one of my speed brakes would not deploy at the end of a long cross country. When I learned that annual lubrication is recommended I first tried to take the easy way out by extending the speed brakes on my Ovation 3 so I could reach the gear to lubricate it. That’s when I realized that I could only access about 90 degrees of the gear and none of the worm drive. Then it occurred to me that the gear only rotates about 90 degrees during deployment so the grease I applied May never come in contact with the worm drive. Also his method would not remove the contaminated old grease which is exposed to the environment. That’s when I knew I would have to remove and disassemble the speed brakes in order to do he job right. I still don’t believe it is necessary to do this every year but the following YouTube video shows how I cleaned, lubricated and inspected my Precise Flight Speed Brakes. Once I did this maintenance the speed brakes worked great.
    6 points
  38. Hey Tyler, best of luck on the final lap with the certificate. I'm in CT too and a DINK like you with a dog. Always had my eye on a Mooney for the speed and economy and was fortunate enough to acquire a J model last year. We are loving it, but certainly some additional expenses I incurred by being a freshly minutes pilot with 0 retreat when I bought the plane. Would I change things knowing what I know now.... probably not (I'm stubborn!) but if you ever want to check out a Mooney or chat about my experience just message me, I'm based out of HFD. I think @Skates97alluded to it, when you're ready to purchase, buy the "nicest" plane you can afford. Upgrading a steal of a plane will be more expensive than paying for a solid, well cared for platform. Happy flying and looking forward to the improving weather too!
    5 points
  39. Some may disagree, but I think there are benefits to learning in a clapped out rental 152. They can safely perform spins, aggressive departure stalls, accelerated stalls, cross controlled accelerated stalls, full forward slips, full side slips, slips to landing...and more with little propensity to bite the student. Clapped out trainers are designed to tolerate the abuse from both the overly confident and the overly timid...And if one destroys one, it's not a huge loss to the fleet. I do not understand the desire to prolong primary flight training by doing it in a high performance aircraft. I took my intro lesson in a 1966 C150F on July 29, 1998, I soloed on August 12th, 1998 with 12.5hrs. (we had to break for three days to change a cracked cylinder). My next flight after solo was on the same day. I did 2.1hrs alone with the aircraft with 16 landings. The following day I did 1.4 and 5 landings before lunch and 1.4 and 6 landings after lunch…all solo. I came back and finished up the following summer break, taking my ride on August 8th, 1999 with just under 46hrs TT, 22 of which were solo. The point is, a lot of learning and skill honing takes place when it's just student and machine. Training in a complex aircraft robs the student of the opportunity to get that first license to learn early in their training. Everyone is different I suppose, but I felt like having a plane that was simple enough to solo early on really accelerated my confidence and skill acquisition. When I returned to college after getting my ticket, I met a guy who was training at a local flight school. He was training in C172s. He had 20hrs more flight time than me but it was spread out over long period. He had yet to solo because his training was so spread out that each additional lesson was half review. Soloing is as much a license to learn as getting the ticket, if not more so. If one is aggressive in their training, one could have a PPL finished faster than one could find and buy the right Mooney. If you have the time and money to shop for a Mooney, you have the time and money to devote to primary training. There is little practical reason to complete training in an HP/complex aircraft other than bragging rights. Which to use an archaic fighter pilot phrase, strikes me as "all balls, >ick and no forehead"...
    5 points
  40. Is there one that sits negative 6” off the ground? Because that’s the one I want under my Mooney.
    5 points
  41. Interesting problem and a bunch of us have the same problem. Unless you are near Texas, cloud cover forecasts the day before will likely cause the candidate airports to shift. Thoughts: Pick an airport with a runway too short for jets- cut down on the competition for parking. Fly in with enough fuel that you don't have to buy any before leaving to save time and avoid the worry about broken pumps. Someplace with plenty of parking on the grass. Fly in the day before and camp? From me (west-central Alabama) the closest places to see totality are Arkansas or Missouri. Could go to TX. We watched the last one in 2017 near Paducah, but that was before we discovered the magic of Al Mooney's creation. We flew to Chile (not by Mooney) in 2019 to watch a total eclipse on the beach!
    5 points
  42. I found the docket with the pilot report and ferry permit using your link and the tail number. In the pilot report under Fuel & Services Information it says that the engine did not run well on the morning of 10/30/2023 and that he replaced the engine driven fuel pump which ran well after that. That is the same day of the 4-5 hour accident flight to Colorado. There is no mention of a test flight after changing the fuel pump. Continental engines require the SID-97 fuel system test and adjustment after fuel pump replacement otherwise anything could be off. The performance and fuel parameters he saw on the prior days and legs could be meaningless. And ther ferry permit says he could only fly in daylight. Does anyone know how long it takes to change the engine driven fuel pump on a Continental in a K? That is one crazy long day racing against sunset. A leak from working on it or just the new pump could have caused this besides not leaning.
    5 points
  43. I've never used a paid system like Adlog. But years of doing my own AD research has convinced me that the value in such a service would not be in the nice paperwork they produce. The value is almost entirely in the extent to which they can hunt down ADs issued against "appliances" that may or may not be attached to your aircraft. Anyone care to speak to that? To elaborate, it doesn't take much knowledge or skill to produce a list of ADs against a particular airframe/engine/prop combo, but appliances are insidious. An AD issued against the magnetos in your airplane is not going to show up under "Mooney" or "Lycoming". Neither is one issued against your ADS-B out Tailbeacon, your Saf-Air oil quick drain, and so on. Obviously a vendor cannot provide you with good service in this respect without a lot of input from you, the owner. So there's really no way around the responsibility of understanding what components on your airplane, who manufactured them, and what their serial numbers are, so as to keep an eye out for ADs issued against them that aren't going to show up under "Mooney". Accepting that responsibility seems to me to obviate much of the value of a vendor AD service. People understandably sign up for those services because they want a professional to help them be responsible for ensuring they know about all ADs applicable to their airplane. But I'm not sure those professional services can help much with anything other than the grossly obvious. Frankly, I think you can do about as well just monitoring our community here on Mooneyspace. People were posting about the recent elevator counterweight AD before it even became official. I'm certain those of us here were better informed, sooner, than someone who was waiting on Adlog or similar service to tell them about it. And that's for an airframe AD. We're also a lot more likely to tell you when an AD has been issued against V-band clamps on turbochargers, Garmin autopilots, etc. vs. waiting for a vendor to tell you about it.
    5 points
  44. I wouldn’t take apart an engine with 1850 hours on it that was running well. There is nothing to be gained. Your concern with the cam is unfounded. The cam in a runout engine has little value unless you are expecting to regrind it. The value in a runout engine is in the crank, case and gears. Everything else gets replaced. Pulling two cylinders will not let you inspect anything of value. My suggestion with a high time engine is to just keep an eye on the filter and screens and if it stares to make metal, pull the trigger and get it overhauled. Otherwise, enjoy the engine until its performance suffers or its oil consumption gets to be a PITA.
    5 points
  45. As has been mentioned, you would have to question the sanity of any Seller if he allowed you to pull two cylinders in a pre-buy on an airplane priced with a run-out engine. You mentioned that the price of the airplane is at the top of your budget. This is going to sound direct - please don't take offense: Provided that the airplane does pass a pre-buy evaluation, do you? Knowing that the engine is near TBO (yes it could go longer) do you have the funds in place if the engine starts making metal soon after purchase? Could you place an order for a factory reman and not be financially strapped? The reason I ask those questions is that this same thing has happened to people on here - they've bought a "great deal" and then soon after they find a major expense that can't be covered. Worst yet they finance a "great deal" and then are making payments on an airplane that can't be flown. The initial price of an airplane is relatively low compared to what it will cost to maintain it, fly it, upgrade it and insure it over the years. It's one thing to run an engine past TBO if you were the one who put the last few hundred hours on it, but I'd be less anxious to plan on doing it in this case.
    5 points
  46. A project in my pipeline is to make a lat/lon estimator using essentially the same hardware as a stratux. The RTL-SDR tuner like what is used in a stratux will digitize enough bandwidth to receive all of the VOR channels simultaneously, so with some signal processing it can detect any VOR signals present and determine the radials of each, and estimate where the radials of multiple received VOR signals cross based on the known lat/lon of the identified VOR stations. It won't be nearly as accurate as GPS, but will give you a good idea of where you are whenever there are at least two VORs in range. I've done a bunch of development on the same hardware already, and also have a decent library of lat/lon computation stuff, so it's mostly just getting time to do it, and there are a few other projects in the pipeline ahead of it, unfortunately. Somebody in the UK did something similar several years ago but it never got much attention, so it's not a unique idea. It'd be a nice backup that you can run on a handheld device, or even on an existing stratux with an additional tuner. I wouldn't be surprised if others aren't already working on the same and'll beat me to having something working, which is fine with me. And, yeah, gps susceptibility to a variety of attacks is a real thing. Everybody knows this, which is why all the global powers have their own system satellite navigation systems, to not be dependent on somebody else's.
    5 points
  47. Mine works fine. No false alarms and passes the g switch test at annual. Haven’t crash tested it, though
    5 points
  48. Took the kid (and my instructor plus his wife) to see Air Passiom Museum in Angers (LFJR) After a dreadful winter, the sunny weather started to appear along the Loire Valley in France
    5 points
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