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  1. I have a 1979 231 that I bought in February of this year. The airplane had sat in a New Mexico hangar for 6 years, so I was a little nervous about this my first annual, even though the airplane has to date performed admirably with a 100% dispatch rate. I took the airplane to Mr. Maxwell on August 24 and received it back on September 13. After about 10 days I received a written quote listing about 36 discrepancies. On the phone Mr. Maxwell went over each one. He was very patient and professional. I asked him to fix it all. Two items were not repaired as we are waiting on parts, but fortunately neither affects airworthiness. The final bill was a little over 5000.00 and a couple of hundred below his estimate. My wife and I left his shop in Longview Texas and immediately commenced our vacation, flying directly to our eldest son’s home in Dexter MO. The next day we flew to our youngest son’s home in Sellersburg, IN. The airplane has performed flawlessly and I am very grateful. I enthusiastically recommend Mr. Maxwell and his team. I am pleased with the quality, pricing and timeliness of the work. I also very much enjoyed visiting with Mr. Maxwell, a very gentle-spoken and knowledgeable man. Torrey
    13 points
  2. My CFI, his GF and I took the 63 C from KERV to 3J7, with a stop at KAEX for fuel and a bathroom break. Headwinds we're absolute murder, they dropped cruise from 160-165MPH down to 110-120MPH but, it still beat a Cessna...lol Just a few pics from the trip, sunrise (we left at 5AM), a couple in La and a neat 2400' grass strip on an island in a river somewhere in Al (I think). I really wanted to land on that island but, with 3 people, luggage and 200# of fuel still on board, I wasn't sure we could get back off of it. We originally planned to land around 1:30 but didn't make it until 3:00, the wind forecast really deteriorated for us overnight. Heading back on Friday, wind forecast looks a lot more favorable, I hope it holds. It was really nice being able to fly to an airport 15 miles from my destination instead of going into ATL and making a 1.5 hour drive, after dealing with TSA and all the other fun stuff involved in commercial air travel. I don't think I'm ever going to go commercial again, at least not if I can avoid it. Sent from my Pixel 6a using Tapatalk
    11 points
  3. When I lived in Denver, my neighbors across the street told me her father used to own an M20E Mooney that he loved. He lost his medical and sold the plane a few years before. One day they said he was coming to visit and asked if I would take him flying. Of course I said yes. He was a cranky old doctor. When we got to the airport I told him to get in the left seat. He looked at me kind of funny, got a big grin on his face and jumped right in. I handed him a sectional and told him to fly us to Leadville. His flying was perfect! His radio work getting us around the Class B (TCA) was perfect! His landing was smooth as silk! His daughter said that they couldn't pry the grin off his face for the rest of his visit. He died one month later. I'm glad I could do that for him.
    10 points
  4. I learned something in my Lycoming factory engine class today. When Lycoming gets your engine, it disassembles it, inspects the parts, discards the unusable parts, cleans and reworks salvageable parts, and puts the parts in stock for use in rebuilt and overhauled engines. Rebuilt engines get built up using parts from this inventory plus whatever new parts are required. Since they are built under Lycoming’s production certificate, they get a new data plate with a new serial number and a new logbook. Overhauled engines are built up the same way from the same inventory. The only part from your engine you will likely get back is the data plate. Overhauled engines are built using Lycoming’s repair station certificate so they must retain the serial number and logbooks. So, what’s the difference except the serial number and logbook? Probably nothing. Both engines will be built to new clearances, but Lycoming’s specs allow more rework on the overhauled parts. Basically the spec requires that rebuilt engine components must be likely to undergo at least on additional overhaul. For instance, crankshaft journal dimensions can be new, -.003, -.006, -.010. A rebuilt crankshaft must be -.006 or better whereas an overhauled crankshaft might be machined down to -.010. But, I’m told that this very rarely happens because most parts retained from used engines are in pretty good shape or they get scrapped. Skip
    10 points
  5. The green dot on the G500 synthetic vision is pretty nice. You’ll crash wherever that dot is.
    10 points
  6. Hey all! This last weekend, I brought my '67 F to her new home. We closed the deal on Aug 20. I flew about 9 hours on two weekends, took two weeks off due to previously scheduled events. Flew 3 more on Saturday and flew solo on Sunday. Feels great! It took 12+ hours to finally feel comfortable with landings. But the more I fly this wonderful machine, the more I like it!
    8 points
  7. I have ideas. But the realistic assessment and underwriting I'd put on it would sideline a lot of 80+ year old pilots. But it'd keep the ones flying who should be flying. I want people 80+ to keep flying if they are safe. But a lot of them are in denial. And the worst of it is that the ramifications of an age-related loss pollute the waters for those who are 80+ and can continue flying. I know what it's like to not be able to find an ~80+ person a quote...and for good underwriting reasons (make/model combination with a pilot who had been out of aviation for a significant period of time - he should not have been flying that type of plane)...and then he ended up in a gruesome pilot error fatal accident shortly thereafter. If I had one wish for the broader aviation community, it would be for them to remember this about insurance: - Rates are up. And yes, it might cost an extra tank or two or even three of fuel per year (depending if you're @201er or someone flying around with 50 gallon bladder capacity . But there's a lot of really good aviation enthusiast underwriters out there who have finally gotten some meaningful pay increases. You'd like to see them make the kind of income to afford GA aircraft ownership, too. - Regarding underwriting for certain planes. Underwriters are real people, too...with real consciences. I have phone conversations with them. Underwriting profitability aside, one might say something similar to "I don't want to be [enabling] someone to get into this life-risking situation." This isn't the military where you solo in a turbine aircraft while your life is full-immersion into aviation. This is different. And most of us in the insurance world want to be a backstop against bad decisions.
    8 points
  8. As a European aircraft owner I can’t emphasize this enough. Whatever beef you have with AOPA, it is NOTHING compared to not having a functional lobbygroup. You can’t make up all the stuff European politicians implement to make your GA-life worse.
    8 points
  9. As of last week, I've owned my M20M Bravo for 30 years. I closed on it on August 28, 1992. If there is anyone who has owned their's longer, I'd be interested in knowing. I'm on my 3rd engine. I've flown my airplane over 4,000 hours. It still seems like new to me. My panel has been upgraded to the limit of what is available for a Mooney. Better than the Acclaim Ultra G1000 Nxi, in my opinion. I've flown and taught in nearly every Mooney model over the past 28 years that I've been a CFII, and more specifically a Mooney specific CFII. I like them all, but the Bravo is the airplane for me. Owning an airplane that is properly maintained is costly, and the Bravo is no exception. Mine gets what it wants with no exceptions. The most expensive of the variable costs are: 1. Engine overhaul. 2. Proactive Turbo and Wastegate overhaul about every 1,300 hours. 3. Prop Overhaul every 2,500 hours. 4. Complete Fuel Tank Reseal after 24 years of ownership. One of the most irritating recurrent costs for me has been the maintenance of the prop deice. The brush blocks need replacement after about 5-600 hours. And recently all the boots needed to be replaced because of an installation error on the part of the prop shop. Although the warranty had expired, they agreed to cover the replacement because it was clearly their error. After only 390 hours, due to not securing the wires properly, centrifugal force caused the wires to slam into the screws of the propeller cone and short every boot. However, most Bravos never had the prop deice option installed. In short, after flying all the other Mooney models I have flown, I love getting back to my airplane.
    8 points
  10. Are you asking if you can legally put a picture of a mooney logo in your mooney? Mooney can barely stay in business. I dont think chasing people that make a logo and put it in their own airplane is high on their list. Just do it.
    7 points
  11. I’ve never seen any dimensions for nose gear retracted height in the wheel well. They have to go high enough to pull the doors closed fully. It’s easy to get them out of adjustment and get the doors rubbing or catching on the tire. Tire size and tread design have an effect on fit and clearance.
    7 points
  12. The other day I had a relatively short flight of about 195nm. Filed for IFR using ForeFlight. So far so good… but then when I called to copy I get this… “standby, your flight plan was not accepted. Have new route for you.” So I copy the new route. No problem… taxi to runway and call for clearance to takeoff (have to call by phone as no radio signal for clearance at field). Response was HFR I have a new route for you…. UGH! Ok so I copy the new clearance and load that in and cleared for takeoff. Switch to radio and call in to departure. Wouldn’t you know it they have another reroute… I accept and agree to copy as the previous clearance put me a bit far over the ocean. I was high enough in my climb to switch to autopilot and start copying new route. While all of this was occurring my trim alarm (My elec trim is currently INOP) was going off in the background. I was busy trying to copy new route and I am right handed so adjusting the trim wheel and copying route was not going to occur at the same time. While in a turn my autopilot disengaged most likely because of the trim not being addressed and I was now in a continuous turn. I was IMC and didn’t realize this until ATC asked if I was direct Robbinsville. At that point I thought my navigation was failing. I acknowledge some sort of navigational issue and they gave me a heading. I sorted it all out and got dialed back in all while IMC. I radioed back in to ATC and told them I was all sorted out. They apologized for constant changes which I appreciated. I think they believe they overloaded me and I am sure they are grateful that continuous turn wasn’t the start of a death spiral… I am also grateful for this! In the end it is all my responsibility and I am going to admit I violated the rule of aviate, navigate, communicate. I was trying to work with ATC first. Next time I will ask them to standby until I am straight and level or at least straight with a long continuous climb… the other thing I learned is maybe when given a reroute I should tell them unable if I don’t agree with it. During the same flight I listened to an airliner tell ATC they needed higher for glide distance to shore or an alternate route. ATC agreed immediately to higher altitude. As a low time pilot I think I am not confident enough to ask them to wait while I figure stuff out or to negotiate with them when I disagree with routing or altitudes. I need to work on that… anyway, just sharing an experience.
    7 points
  13. Or perhaps there's a Urologist that can chime in.
    7 points
  14. We left KFUL just before sunrise. We weren't in the clouds until about 11,000' but it was spectacular. Between layers the rising sun came down through the layer above us and lit up the layer underneath. After about 20 minutes in the clouds we were treated to surfing just above the clouds.
    7 points
  15. If you still have one of these, yes you can remove it.
    7 points
  16. Aviation fuel STC's have been around longer than most here on MS has been flying. The Petersen Fuel STC was introduced in 1983 and claims over 39,000 purchased and issued. The Swift Fuel STC was introduced in 2015. Petersen charges $1.50/HP and Swift started out at $400 but is now $100. GAMI said they will follow typical fuel STC pricing. Why all the angst, outrage and vitriol now over a measly one time maybe $300 for mid and short bodies, maybe about $450 for long bodies or maybe it will be $100. We pay more than that for virtually anything on our planes or any annual subscription for data that expires. The carping about the long established use of fuel STC's seems disingenuous. This is great day for GA. This will extend the life of our fleet. We have a superior fuel with higher energy content that will allow modern synthetic oil, higher compression, cleaner burning with less maintenance that may ultimately extend TBO. Braly/Roehl/GAMI are the classic American capitalistic success story. They are the "Davids" that persevered with their own investment and successfully did what the "Giants" (Shell, Chevron, BP, Total, FAA Coordinating Research Council ( CRC ) Unleaded Aviation Gasoline Development 1992-2007, FAA PAFI, etc.) couldn't do. They created both a technical success and successfully navigated the regulatory process. Their reward is well deserved.
    7 points
  17. As pilots here in the US, we have to have an organization which fights for us. AOPA is the voice of General Aviation. Basic Med, no user fees .... are just a few examples. And they fight very hard for keeping airports open for us. Without that advocacy we will end up like the pilots in Germany or Europe: High fuel taxes, high landing fees, approach and departure fees, no landings from noon to 3pm, no landings if the tower is not manned or in the dark, restrictions everywhere, no GPS approaches to most General Aviation airports, no ADS-B weather, noise restrictions (need of buying a new prop or muffler from time to time) no basic med, lots of parts are TBO limited and way more. Germany for example has an AOPA group but this group is so small that it has only very little political power. With AOPA in the US it is completely different. The organization with its 280,000 members has a powerful voice in Washington, at the FAA and everywhere else where decisions are done. I was also wondering about the high salary of Mark Baker, but this is not a reason for me to cancel my membership. I saw and still see Mark fighting hard for our pilots interests and rights on the political stage. This needs to be continued. I even would encourage more pilots to become a member. The bigger the group is, the stronger we are on the political stage and at the FAA.
    7 points
  18. Consider yourself lucky that someone else bought it.
    6 points
  19. When I was a kid, someone that I won’t name wiped the dip stick and laid it across the top of the motor mount after deciding to add a qt.. They added oil, closed the oil door and set off. We landed 3 hours later. Next morning we are preparing for departure and said pilot says “$hit, I forgot the dip stick”. There was no evidence of oil vapor nor leakage. Moral of the story…tightening down the dipstick isn’t really needed.
    6 points
  20. 6 points
  21. It’s done! Passed the ck ride! Long story short said I did a great job on approaches. Finally after 25 years… -Don
    6 points
  22. Most engines will run for several minutes at high power, without oil pressure, before incurring damage. An engine at idle for two minutes could still be OK, and there are ways to learn this, short of a complete tear down. The normal procedure would be to refill the sump, and run the engine for ten minutes, verify you have correct oil pressure (at the same temperature and pressure as before, verify with engine data). Then drain the oil through a fine mesh screen, and examine the filter. If there was bearing damage it will show up right away with small flakes in the oil. If any bits are found, the next step is to pull a front cylinder and remove the rod from the crankshaft to check the bearing and journal.
    6 points
  23. Lovely flight from KLDJ to KRKD for some lobsters. We headed up the Hudson river, then LGA tower turned us east over Central Park, then directly over LGA
    6 points
  24. Virtually Every shop, including the most loved shops here on MS gets it’s share of complaints or negative reviews. It’s genuinely challenging for anyone to sift through the available information to determine if one shop is better for you over another. But Western Skyways is one of bigger and most capable engine shops in the country. One of ways you can help success is by clear communications that comes from being able to drop by periodically; not be pain but being interested in seeing it come together. They’re close enough you can do that - if that interest you. Not everyone would want to. But perhaps after the inspection is complete you’d like to be able to see the stuff that did pass, see stuff that is worn that might be worth replacing etc You’ll be much better informed being able to see them in person than by phone.
    6 points
  25. I just got back from a tour of the Lycoming factory. They have invested heavily to bring more work in house for better control over quality and cost. About all they don’t do now is casting and forging. The factory floor is an interesting mix of very modern highly automated machining equipment, mid-20th century machine tools, and 19th century techniques (I saw two workers mating case halves with a plastic mallet). Lycoming is currently as much as a year behind on cylinder kits depending on the model. This is due to bringing head manufacturing in house just before Covid hit, which caused a gap in production, while simultaneously demand increased greatly beyond forecast. Apparently, a lot of folks decided to put money into airplanes during Covid — especially homebuilders. Vans went from a distant 3rd to Lycoming’s biggest customer (by “ many millions of dollars”). They are currently running 6 automated CNC lines that can machine heads from raw castings in about 45 minutes for a parallel valve head, and an hour for angled valve heads. Machines are running 24/7. Lycoming has about 520 employees and is shipping about 12 engines per day. Lycoming is still shipping new dual mag engines. They get the mags from Kelly. Apparently Partenavia uses them in some model. And, for Clarence @M20Doc, they rebuild or overhaul about two IO-720s per year. Skip
    6 points
  26. To make the field dead stick you need about a 6 degree slope. Messing around with this in my and other simulators reveals if you take the AGL altitude at the marker and double it. Then add 1000'. This is because when you drop the gear, your glide ratio goes down quickly. Even then, don't drop the gear until 200'. I've managed to make it work in everything from an A330 to a C-182RG. Recognize however if you drop through the glide slope prior to the MAP, you're likely toast. You want to arrive at the MAP just as the GS is starting to center. You'll hit brick one, not the TDZ but you'll make it. Barring that, best to do an overhead circle but in reality, 500' ceiling is about the minimum for that. Single engine IMC is a calculated risk and light twin IMC until you are above Vyse is an even bigger risk.
    6 points
  27. I'm not sure the engineers over here will wash that im afraid. Possibly on some of the parts but on others no. Basically the co owner had a heavy landing in March. He is now Dead, I've had him shot. But the engineers are insisting on replacing all the bolts and doughnuts in the gear mechanism to ensure all is well going forward. The UK CAA regs are seriously gold then platinum plates when it comes to this stuff. If push comes to shove then yes I might be able to use used parts in some areas, but it may be difficult. Thanks Though.
    6 points
  28. Here's a picture showing the panel with the dash pad attached to it. I've installed and tested the LED lighting strip and I think it will provide adequate lighting, even with the brightness adjusted very low but I won't know for sure until I get everything inside the frame. Now I just need to make the vinyl labels for all buttons and switches and the panel will be ready for wiring.
    6 points
  29. Which makes you wonder how the people at Mooney decided that the reason planes weren’t selling was the lack of a second door and not the lack of parachute and useful load. I wonder how things would have gone differently if instead of adding a second door they had offered a GW increase and parachute.
    6 points
  30. On the first engine I had the Bravo conversion done at 1,395 hours. Lycoming basically gave us the conversion with a charge of $5,000 if you had it done within 2 years. I waited until the 2 years was just about up to get the most use out of the conversion. So I took it over TBO to 2,395 hours before I replaced it with a Reman Zero Time Engine. The second engine went to 1,600+ hours and would have made it past TBO had there not been a shop incident during an Annual a few years ago that dropped the airplane on its nose during a Gear Bypass Switch test. Two prop blades were bent, and although the prop wasn't in motion, an engine teardown was required. Since I had only 400 hours left on the engine, I chose to save myself over $50,000 and sacrifice the 400 hours I had left on the engine. I purchased a new Reman for the 3rd engine discounted by what would've been the cost of a teardown, labor for the replacement, and other costs like loss of use that their insurance company paid for. I wouldn't accept a repair of the prop blades, so their insurance company paid for a new prop. I did have to replace two cylinders on the second engine due to intake valve leaks. That was unusual. At the time I think both cylinders were replace for a little under $9,000 including labor. Currently I have 400 hours on the 3rd engine. I expect all Bravo engines should go to TBO if they are treated properly. That doesn't mean running them at 34/2400 at 1750°TIT. So the premise above of 1,300 hours TBO for the Bravo engine is incorrect. Regarding other costs: I recommend proactively overhauling the turbo and waste gate at about 1,100 hours. Relatively speaking it is not too expensive. Main Turbo in Visalia, California does mine. Expect some exhaust work during the engine's life. I've had several cracks from time to time that required the part to be sent out for repair. Religiously change the oil every 25 hours and plugs every 450 hours. That's about it.
    6 points
  31. A public forum is probably not the best place to negotiate a price on an airplane
    5 points
  32. I've experienced this a few times in other airplanes. It sounded like your transmissions were broken, yet somewhat readable. To rule out a failure of the Capt. side PTT...start with these: Reach over to the F/O side PTT and see if that works. Switch radios (assuming you have more than one). Use your handheld microphone (assuming you have one). Try using a handheld comm radio, like a Yaesu, Icom, etc. (albeit, this has limited range if not connected to an aircraft antenna). Squawk 7600 so ATC knows you have a comm failure and can manage you accordingly. If I may, a couple of unsolicited pieces of advice based on your video... When clearing a runway, announce "clear of Runway XXX" rather than "clear of the active". Too many people use "the active", and it's really annoying, not to mention procedurally incorrect. Regardless of how many runways are in use at any airport, everyone needs to know where you are. They cannot assume - nor should you expect them to know - what "the active" is if they haven't landed or taken off yet, as a runway can change any time. When you were asked to keep your speed up on final, you acknowledged it, and made a comment about "landing long". There is no such thing. The proper term is "a long rollout", and it's something you should ask ATC for permission to do, as they expect you to turn off at the first-available and suitable runway exit. Without asking them and getting it approved, you may be forcing other traffic on short final behind you to go around unnecessarily. Lastly, if you're not comfortable with accepting an ATC instruction to keep your speed up on final, go around. Forcing the airplane to slow down quickly only helps de-stabilize the approach, which can lead to bad things. Hope this all helps. Good luck with the PTT issue, and let us know how it turns out. Steve
    5 points
  33. My Executive has been hangered it's whole life and the exterior paint leaves a lot to be desired. However, the airframe is clean and corrosion free. I don't really care what anyone thinks of it. It's safe, operational and has an excellent dispatch rate. It's purpose is to shepherd my family and stuff to different regions of the country at 150kts. I could not give two $hits what the pilot lounge, coffee club curmudgeons or a potential shopper thinks of it. It’s not for sale. It’s a tool for travel.
    5 points
  34. Referring to "Key" numbers: 3 of any combination of MP in inches or RPM/1000 is approximately 10% power when ROP. As opposed to gliding, turning down the RPM is analogous to shifting down in a car. The engine is running the prop, not the other way around. When under power the engine should run the prop for less wear and tear on the engine. When gliding, as in engine failure, you'd like to reduce drag, and in that case you'd like as little drag as possible and the prop as close to feather as possible. As mentioned above in another post, it's efficient to go as fast as practical in the descent to make up for the loss of time in the climb to altitude. So, if it's smooth, I'll descend in the yellow arc, otherwise the top of the green arc or maneuvering speed, if turbulence is a factor. Regarding the 165 knot limitation in the Bravo, that's with the gear down, and is an irrelevant number in the normal descent, since the gear will be up. Until in the pattern, the MP should never be set less than 15" to make sure the engine is running the prop. Slope of descent makes a difference in power management. A "slam dunk" should be flown differently than a normal descent. So, for efficiency, I'll descend as fast as practical when VFR, and that means knowing the rate of slow down of our airplane and importantly managing your fastest cooling cylinder head temperature to keep it below the 50°/minute limitation on our engines. I have it as a data field on my MVP-50 engine monitor. When I do start reducing power, I'll gradually reduce the MP to 20", then reduce the RPM to 2000. The MP will increase a couple of inches with reduction in RPM. I'll be monitoring the fastest cooling CHT to keep it below the 50°/minute limitation. Then I will further reduce the MP to 15". If a faster descent rate is then necessary, I'll add speed brakes, but I leave that to last because of the inefficiency it produces if you add them too soon and then have to add power because your descent rate was too great. Of course the gear comes down in the pattern, but adding the gear too early is VERY inefficient. In my opinion this is the way a descent should be managed on all the Mooneys (less speed brakes if a Mooney doesn't have them), no matter what has been written by anyone less familiar with the Mooney aircraft.
    5 points
  35. Stopped for fuel at KMEI heading home and they parked me here. Sent from my Pixel 6a using Tapatalk
    5 points
  36. Not that I can think of, unless they have leaks above that level.
    5 points
  37. Thoughts from a Mike Busch article. The next item that caught my eye was a $200 estimate for cleaning the engine’s fuel injector nozzles. I used to do such prophylactic nozzle cleaning on my own airplane until about 10 years ago, when I had an illuminating discussion with George Braly (of GAMI and Tornado Alley Turbo fame), who is arguably the world’s expert on fuel nozzles. George pointed out to me that there’s no valid reason to do such periodic nozzle cleaning, because the nozzles do not get dirty in service (since they are continuously being cleaned by a very effective solvent). He told me that in his experience with many thousands of GAMIjector nozzles, virtually all clogged nozzle events occurred shortly after maintenance during which the fuel system was opened up and some foreign material got into the system. That resonated with me, because in the first 12 years I owned my Cessna T310R, I experienced two clogged-nozzle episodes, and both occurred right after maintenance due to grease getting into the fuel system. So I stopped cleaning my nozzles 10 years ago, and haven’t had a clogged nozzle since.
    5 points
  38. A few things I picked up in my Lycoming factory engine class. 1. Lycoming plain bearings are steel shells plated with copper, then silver and finally tin-lead for the bearing surface. 2. We examined a lot of bad bearings. Some were relatively smooth but worn down to the silver or copper layer. Some were deeply scored. Some had chunks of missing tin-lead (called "pick out"). So, there are different types of bearing damage. 3. Lycoming has a very comprehensive document regarding metal contamination and what action to take. https://www.lycoming.com/content/service-bulletin-no-480-f 4. Lycoming has a metallurgical lab and will analyze metal found in the engine for free. Good job getting safely down and good luck with the engine! Skip
    5 points
  39. I would like to pause for a moment and thank all who have participated in this thread and on this forum in general. I have and continue to rely on your collective expertise to guide me to become a better, safer pilot and maintainer of my aircraft. Your input is greatly appreciated. I feel sometimes like I will be judged negatively from some of the information I share but each time I have those reservations, the responses are largely thoughtful, respectful and very helpful. Thanks again.
    5 points
  40. I’m just some guy on the Internet. You can have the mechanic who puts his airplane back together to call Lycoming and get their take on the subject, then analyze the data that it ran for two minutes without oil pressure, and then ask him to return it to service and all of the liability that incurs as well. It’s like a prop strike, it’s probably OK but you really don’t know.
    5 points
  41. Lycoming SB 399 covers this… https://www.lycoming.com/sites/default/files/Action to Take If Loss of Oil Pressure.pdf
    5 points
  42. My 2 cents is a rule of thumb I picked up from Jimmy Garrison. If most of your trips are less than 400 miles, a J is fine. If most are over 400 miles you will be happier with a K. Before I bought my K I rented a buddies J and flew the same trips I do now. Most are over 400 miles. I was very happy with the J, but acting on Jimmy’s advice I bought a K and am even happier. I am sure the O’s, B’s etc would be even nicer but I don’t have the wallet to even consider that league. I don’t fly in the teens, but 10, 11 and 12 have worked out very nicely so far. Grant it I don’t have but 7 months ownership, but no regrets yet. Torrey
    5 points
  43. Just to follow up i wound up sending my switch in as jackie found out they were out of stock on a new one. Said mine wasn’t so much the springs but the case that holds the pin had worn to the point that it didn’t keep the pin in alignment with the spring and switch. Fixed it all up and put on about a ft of connecting wire from the switch which alliw us to fish the wires down the handle and solder them to the wires coming out of the yoke tube. Works great and improved my ap tests since the switch now springs back to neutral everytime.
    5 points
  44. You need to take it to a shop with the correct travel board, inclinometer, manual and knowledgeable maintainers to get this checked out.
    5 points
  45. HI Kris- I wish you would've contacted us directly before throwing away your dual CGR system. I would've like to have attempted to help as much as possible to try to regain your confidence in our products. However, as you were obviously very unhappy with the system, we would have been happy to have offered you a full refund on the purchase price of your system in an effort to alleviate some frustration.
    5 points
  46. End of my saga. I walked away. Too many issues for me and I would have been very upside down. Think I’ll wait until I actually receive my medical then work on a purchase.
    5 points
  47. Flying corporate, I’ve told my boss his passengers weigh too much and he would have to leave 1 off the manifest. I’m not willing to compromise whatever safety factor we have above max weight. Same with the Mooney. Will it fly over gross? Sure. Thats for the test guys to figure out though.
    5 points
  48. Dang it, anyone know how to delete a post? Didn’t mean to post a picture of my mistress. Here’s my wife. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    5 points
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