gsxrpilot

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gsxrpilot last won the day on November 19

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About gsxrpilot

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Austin, TX
  • Reg #
    N252AD
  • Model
    M20K 252 TSE

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  1. gsxrpilot

    Fatal Carbon Monoxide Crash

    I've got two CO sensors. If either of them go off showing dangerous levels of CO, I'm doing all of the above. Shut off the heater... if it's on. Open all ceiling vents. If that solves the problem, then I'd likely continue to destination. But not fly again until fixing the problem. If not... Slow to below 130 knots IAS. Open the window. If that solves the CO level, then find an airport and land. If not, then keep slowing and open the door. Find an airport and land.
  2. gsxrpilot

    Advice on the PPL

    Welcome aboard Ken. I'd say it depends on your end goal. Are you young and on the front end of a process that will get you an airline job someday followed by a long career as an airline pilot? Or are you approaching the end of a career that has finally given you the disposable income to pursue something you've always wanted to do. But it's strictly a hobby? If the first scenario is true... then go sign up for a flight school and do what they suggest/recommend/require. If it's the second scenario... then I'd start out self studying for the written. While you're doing that, start looking for an instructor. I'd try to find someone independent of a flight school. But the bottom line is to find someone you like to hang out with and can learn from. Treat it like interviewing an employee. Talk to several until you find a CFI who will let you learn the way you want to. My experience was that a lot of CFI's treated me like an 8th grade student. I wanted someone who would allow me to direct my studies... more like a graduate student. It will likely take longer this way, but was a lot more fun for me. Once you find the right CFI, then tell them you've self studied for the written and get them to sign you off to take it.
  3. gsxrpilot

    Mooney buying advice

    And that about sums it up @carusoam.
  4. It seems to me that in this case... the airplane is coming out of storage... the seller shouldn't be opposed to pulling a couple of cylinders during the pre-buy.
  5. gsxrpilot

    $100 Burger

    I think he meant T82 which is filled out.
  6. gsxrpilot

    Mooney buying advice

    Ah, got it. Yep and I'll agree. But I don't think I care about a legal representation of airworthiness (one can always find a guy who will sign it off... just find the pencil whipper) but I do care about protecting my investment. I guess I'm saying I less about the fact the airplane is "legally" airworthy as much as I care that it's in properly airworthy condition to the standards of a well respected and Mooney knowledgeable AI. If Don Maxwell tells me over the phone, that he's looked at the plane and it's a good one, that says more about the investment I'm about to make, then any signature in the logbook attached to an annual. But this makes me think... I get a pre-buy done all the way through to a full annual and signed off by the AI who's local to the seller. Then I fly the plane home and my mechanic, lets say Don Maxwell just for argument, shows me several airworthy issues with the plane that the previous AI overlooked/missed/ignored, but signed off. Do I have any legal recourse against the AI who signed off the annual a few days prior? If I do, then it seems the annual inspection is worth something. If not, then why have it done at all?
  7. gsxrpilot

    Mooney buying advice

    Just because an annual is a legally required inspection, it says nothing about the continued airworthiness of the airplane. Exhibit A would be all the airplanes that have years of pencil whipped annuals in their log books. I see them all the time come through SWTA. The point being, it doesn't matter whether you get a pre-buy done or a full signed-off annual done on the plane you want to purchase. What matters is the expertise and honesty of the A&P doing the inspection. There's nothing magical about getting an annual done instead of a pre-buy. In fact from my experience, the pre-buy's I've had done at Don Maxwell's shop and at SWTA, are more thorough than any annual.
  8. gsxrpilot

    G5 not coming on

    Hmmmm.... I never touch the G5 unit itself. Just turn off the master and it counts down then goes off.
  9. gsxrpilot

    Fatal Carbon Monoxide Crash

    I have both. I've been using the SensorCon for some time now, but saw the 20% off on the Guardian and bought the panel mount as well. It will get installed in the next week or so.
  10. The new Aspen MAX isn't susceptible to this. And it's why it's certified without a standby AI.
  11. I was in a very similar position as you a couple of years ago. As the proud owner of a very capable and efficient traveling Mooney, I wanted a rock solid IFR panel to go with it. And so consequently did a ton of research. The result is I agree with just about all of the responses here. If you're going this far, don't stop, but finish the job. Definitely don't spend money on the 530... but trade it for an IFD540 (not 550). The difference between the Garmin and the Avidyne is huge but the space between the 540 and 550 Avidyne's is not worth the cost IMO. Hold out for the MAX Aspens. Maybe you are already. Remove the ASI as well. Move the Altimeter to the spot vacated by the ASI. I'd remove the second Nav head (Aspen can display multiple nav sources simultaneously). But if you want to keep the 2nd Nav head, move it up. This movement allows you to mount the JPI-900 horizontally. There is one benefit there, and that is all EGT and CHT values are always displayed instead of cycling. It's nice to know at a glance without waiting for the number to come up in the cycle. Looks great! There's nothing quite like having a great panel.
  12. gsxrpilot

    Why do they let them sit unflown

    I've said it before on this forum and you all can hold me to it... If I'm ever in a situation where I can't fly my Mooney at least 100 hours per year, I will add a young CPL or CFI pilot to my insurance and make them a set of keys. They can build hours for the price of gas. If I can't afford to maintain it as I should, it will be sold, or I'll take on a partner even if it's just to help with maintenance costs, no equity buy in required. Keep it maintained and flying or let someone else do it. Friends don't let friends neglect their airplanes.
  13. Very sad news today out of Fredericksburg, TX. Pecos Bill, the P51 Mustang out of Burnet, TX stopped in at the Airport Diner for brunch. I wasn't there, but lots of Austin pilot friends were there. Everyone got lots of pictures and some video. After eating, the pilot and passenger took off and after a return for a low pass down the runway, they climbed out over the town. Just a few minutes later they went down in an apartment complex parking lot, killing both occupants of the airplane. Truly a sad day. https://www.kxan.com/news/texas/2-veterans-dead-vintage-plane-destroyed-in-fredericksburg-crash/1603904380