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  1. At my last employer, the owner had an B36TC. I think he would have liked to come up with a policy that would exclude me from flying and allow him to fly, but he couldn't. Our planes were both IFR single engine turbocharged airplanes and I had more hours and more license than he did. FWIW, About 35 years ago I worked for a company where the owner owned a Cessna Cutlass RG. We raced to Tucson once and I beat him handially with my M20F. A week later he bought a turbo 182 RG. It could hang with me. At my last employer the owner owned half interest in an old Bonanza. We raced to Tucson too, and I beat him. About a month later he bought the B36TC. Now he outruns me by about 20 KTS.
    8 points
  2. I sent out the first 100 Pre-201 Valuation Guides today. 52 pages including photos and almost 18,000 words geared toward the Pre-201 Mooney, the different models, the mods and upgrades and how to arrive at proper value when you tie it all together. It is FREE for Mooney owners. If you don't own but are thinking about buying, email me and I will get you info on what to do if you want one. I will follow up the Pre-201 Guide with an M20J Guide in a few weeks, followed by M20K sometime end of July and hopefully M/R/S by the end of the summer. Email is jimmy@gmaxamericanaircraft.com For owners, just need a tail number to plug into my database. Thanks a bunch! Jimmy
    6 points
  3. Probably more likely to explode over touch and goes, ROP v LOP, whether to lock the baggage hatch or not, or whether shock cooling is real or not.
    6 points
  4. Do you have to yell, wtf is wrong with you. And try to type legible sentences also. It hurts to read shitposts like this
    5 points
  5. There's a significant history of douchebaggery, yes. $1M defamation judgement against him. https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2023/august/17/texas-court-orders-youtuber-to-pay-for-defamation Protective order for stalking a woman: https://casetext.com/case/angelle-v-gryder This barely scratches the surface. He has accusations of interfering with an NTSB investigation after he trespassed and stole evidence from a crash site in ID, a significant arrest record outside of that, etc., etc., etc. The most recent was disparaging the pilots fatally injured in the crash of the Electra in Chino just days before this crash, when the possibility of knowing what actually happened is pretty low. The examples are legion. He's not exactly a pillar of aviation society.
    5 points
  6. I feel this way with just about every thread on Mooneyspace....
    5 points
  7. The Ford Tri-Motor is in town giving rides this weekend. An iconic piece of aviation history built in 1929 and still flying almost 100 years later.
    4 points
  8. There is one BIG rule with dual mags- Pay Attention! NEVER AND I MEAN NEVER loosen a mag hold down nut with a star washer underneath without replacing the star washer for a new one!! Dual mags (and others) have fallen off because of this very problem. Anytime a hold down nut has been tightened and then loosened for any reason- THE STAR WASHER MUST BE REPLACED WITH A BRAND NEW ONE.PERIOD!!! End of sermon.
    4 points
  9. ^^This. I'd make sure it's actually the gear actuator causing the problem before changing it out. With the airplane on jacks you can learn a lot, and can disconnect the actuator and move the gear by hand to see if something is binding somewhere. There are a lot of things that can be wrong beside the gears.
    4 points
  10. This subject is getting so old. Please educate me there are at least three major producers of 100 plus unleaded fuel shell, Sunoco, VP plus others that are less well known. Is there some magical chemistry needed I understand it’s a certification thing like so many other issues we have to put up with I just don’t know why it has to be such a Problem getting it done. Personally I don’t think our very small percentage of lead is causing anyone any health problems just like most of the other made up issues that ultimately are used to take away our freedom. But hey, that’s just my thoughts on the issue. there isn’t anything special about my old o360
    4 points
  11. I would be more concerned with the single engine.
    4 points
  12. My airplane is HOME and in my hangar. Short flight to bring if from the installer. So far, nothing wrong. There were a few things from the test flight, but they tweaked those. I do need to do some testing of the autopilot pitch. On initial climb out it seems to hunt some, but then after leveling off it is rock solid. It might need the new alternative gain settings. But perfectly flyable now. Now that it is done, I want to give a BIG thumbs up to Smart Avionics at N71. They have been super to work with and very accommodating to my wild ideas. If you are looking to do an avionics upgrade, I would highly suggest them. There are 2 Mooneys there now and one coming next week.
    4 points
  13. A 3 count on the prime solved (hopefully) my starting issue. I went flying yesterday and the 3 count worked for me, it was in the high 80⁰ F. I was over-priming it before. Thanks for the help and discussion!
    4 points
  14. Make sure you compare like services. New/reman usually comes with all new accessories (fuel servo, alternator, mags, etc). Overhauls maybe some, maybe not.
    4 points
  15. Never let it be said this forum can’t take a 40NM flight and turn it into a project.
    4 points
  16. We saw them in UK (EGTH & EGSX) and France (LFRK), it's impressive that they fly every year on tour in good shape: kudos to all volonteers, pilots and mechanics ! I think they are heading to Venize LIPV this weekend
    4 points
  17. We finally had a day without rain and I headed up to Memmingen, Germany. Look who else was visiting! Placid Lassie... They were skydiving out of her. The pilot sounded American. Plus my token pic of Zurich, Zurich Airport and what is visible of the Alps. I must have taken this photo 100 times on 50 different flights, but each time I'm there, I just can't resist it.
    4 points
  18. This is indeed the best news. I pray it stays that way. The last year made me age twice at fast…
    4 points
  19. Well, speaking from both actual experience and as an EE, I don't think it matters much. Mine were bundled with the ignition wires and I never noticed any issue. Then last year at my Top Gun annual they moved the wires as they said it was bad to have them that way. Haven't noticed any difference since To go all nerdy, this doesn't surprise me. While the thermocouple voltage is pretty small (30-50 milli-Volts) BOTH wires run close together and parallel to each other. The electronic circuit that is 'processing' this signal is looking ONLY at the difference between the voltage on the two wires and IGNORES any voltage common to both wires. Given the physical proximity of the thermocouple wires any voltage induced on one wire will have nearly the IDENTICAL voltage induce on the other. The circuit will reject that common voltage and the signal (temperature) will be unaffected. Further, while the ignition lead is high voltage it is pretty well shielded (if not, you'd have major radio interference), so I suspect the induced common voltage is actually relatively small. Finally, the thermocouple circuit is pretty low resistance (maybe 100 ohms max) which means quite a bit of current would have to be induced and the ignition system is not really high current, plus the thermocouple wires are close together which minimizes the loop area making the circuit less susceptible to current induced errors. Oh, and modern electronics likely have a pretty decent filter circuit to reject high-frequency noise.
    4 points
  20. I went with stick-built frame on an insulated foundation. Pole barns cost less but are more difficult to finish than 16” on-center studs. I sided it with cedar siding to match the house. Metal buildings may be cheaper, but they really don’t fit in well among homes if everything else is residential. I did not elect to put radiant heat in the floor and went with suspended gas burners. I would do radiant floor heat if I were to get a do-over. Suspended radiant may not be code, depending on how far from fuel (wings) they are. I went with a hydroswing door rather than bi-fold only because there were no bi-fold doors available after a sporty hurricane season in Florida (2004-5). I don’t regret going with the single piece door. It seals very well, is easy to insulate, and offers a big area of shade in the summer. if possible, face the door south and choose blacktop for the ramp. North-facing doors get snow piled up against them, and south fac8ng blacktop ramps will melt light snowfall with a little sun. as with any construction project, bring extra money and allow extra time. living in a fly-in community for the last 2 decades has been a very good experience for us. -dan
    4 points
  21. Hello Mooney friends. My wife recovered fine from Leukaemia, which is the best news in a very long time, so I am NOT complaining, but my bird is scrap metal due to corrosion in the wing etc. Now I am parting it out. A friend wants to use my new leather seats from my J in his 1980 K-model. The front seats seem to fit, but how about the rear seats and the side panels? Thanks for the advise! Irmin
    4 points
  22. I think it all started with the 20:1 gears. They wore out pretty fast. When they changed to the 40:1 gears they required the inspections because they didn’t know how long they would last. They seem to last a long time. If someone wanted to go to the trouble, they could probably get the inspection interval extended. When I look at the two actuators, I see the Dukes as a highly engineered aerospace component that was designed to be as light as possible and still meet the requirements. When I look at the Eaton actuator, I see a heavy assembly that was quickly designed with little regard to weight.
    3 points
  23. The Dukes actuator is perfectly adequate for the job. If it is properly maintained, it will give decades of reliable service. If maintenance is skipped or not adequately done, well, you get what you pay for. I wouldn’t throw it out, because of some bad turnout for some improperly maintained actuators.
    3 points
  24. None. Which is really the point. The number of gear up landings caused by mechanical failures (J-bar or electric) is very small compared to pilot errors. Just like driving, the nut behind the wheel is the most likely component to fail. I don't worry about the gear failing to come down (although since I had a relay and then a microswitch fail, I have some concern about it going up); but I do very much worry about getting distracted by unusual ATC requests, traffic or some unrelated emergency.
    3 points
  25. We finally made it through inspection and finalized a deal! If everything goes smoothly, we close Monday and will bring it home late next week! Will post some pics shortly. Then will be asking lots of questions…
    3 points
  26. Avidyne 440 is my choice for full function gps nav com. I am a firm believer in keeping ground based nav capabilities.
    3 points
  27. It was about 8 weeks late on the avionics. Oil leak took a couple of extra weeks due my mechanic having to take the time to travel to the avionics shop. The tech worked on the plane pretty much the entire time, not being pulled to other projects. The only amount over the original quote was for changes I made. Yes, really.
    3 points
  28. Out of all these, the only candidate who have promising on “PAFI route” are VPRacing, they already have something similar to their C10 fuel that apparently passed initial PAFI testing in 2023 and now they have 6 months or 1 year to come up with “ASTM Avgas”. Yes in the past, VPRacing did lot of “high octane and/or high etanol” Mogas with ratings that would exceed 100LL (E102, M103, VP-C16, X98..), however, many of these will eat lot of rubber in an aircraft and they do lot of oxygen bubbles: they do not work in aircraft airframes (unless one put lot of pressure on fuel tank and fly full power at sea level). We will see if they can make an Avgas? If you look at their fuels, it’s hard to get octane (MON) > 100 without lead (TEL) or oxygen (O2) https://vpracingfuels.com/master-fuel-tables/ For “STC route”, we have GAMI G100UL (and Swift UL94), these seems to do the job for octane, however, we will hear more and more about new aromatics: it seems engine and airframe manufacturers are not too keen (Lycoming are not touching G100UL with barge pole, I am not sure if it’s fear of change, fear of liability or something well founded) Does anyone knows what G100UL is made from? other than “ink”
    3 points
  29. If you look closely at the motor on your installed landing gear actuator, it looks like it was manufactured in 1978, This appears to be an early version of the Avionics Products Company actuator, Serial number 817. That actuator is superior to the Dukes, as @PT20J highlighted. Mooney dropped the Dukes and started using the Avionics Products Company actuator as standard in 1977 starting on the M20J with serial number 24-0378. Avioncis Products Company, via corporate sales and dispositions, eventually became the Eaton actuatror. (see below). However, you also have a Vickers label on it without any model number or serial numbers and a "Clutch Spring Replacement" label (that is the "No Back Spring"). I think that you have a unit that was overhauled by Vickers. And since Eaton bought Vickers in 1999 and combined it with its Avionics Products Company (Division of Consilidated Controls) after that date, this was likely overhauled after 1999. I would bet that this was installed in your plane in 2000 or after. Avionics Products Company (Denville, NJ) was owned by Consolidated Controls Corporation (CONDEC) Avionics Products Company sold actuators to Mooney labeled under the name Avionics Products Company (Denville, NJ) Some are just labeled CONDEC - Consolidated Controls Corp. Consolidated Controls Corporation (CONDEC) was purchased by Chicago industrialist Farley in 1984. The acquisition went badly for Farley and Farley sold CONDEC to Eaton in May 1986. So in 1986 Eaton inherited Avionics Products Company actuators - they changed the labeling at some point to Eaton. I have seen some labeled with Eaton Valve and Actuator Div. (El Segundo, CA) In 1984, Libbey-Owens-Ford (L-O-F) acquired Vickers Inc., a leading maker of hydraulic and electrohydraulic systems, from the Sperry Corporation. (no relation to the Vickers PLC (UK). L-O-F combined Vickers with Aeroquip, which they had purchased in 1968 and renames it Aeroquip-Vickers In 1999 Eaton acquires Aeroquip-Vickers The Vickers Aerospace Actuators and Controls Div.is located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. There are Mooney actuators labeled with only the Vickers name (Vickers Aerospace Actuators and Controls Div.- Grand Rapids, Michigan) It is not clear if Vickers made any actuators before the Eaton takeover. More likely Eaton consolidated all Mooney landing gear actuator manufacturing in the Vickers division. However, the actuators labeled with "Vickers" do no say that they are a division of Eaton.
    3 points
  30. I don't feel that's necessarily true. For a distance traveling machine, like many Mooneys are, a solid AP makes it much easier to focus on the big picture (route, weather, ATC comms, etc.). For a local VFR aircraft with mostly short flights it may not matter as much. But in my mind the Mooney platform was built to be a fully capable IFR traveling machine...and an AP makes that SO much less workload, less stress and more capable. YMMV edit: as an aside, for a distance traveling VFR only pilot, I'd suggest that a capable autopilot is potentially life saving with inadvertent VFR into IMC.
    3 points
  31. Same experience here. It was a hard no when I was an employee, but I don't know that it mattered because much of my travel was further than I'd have wanted to fly a GA airplane. It's the usual distinction between employee and contractor, at least if you're not a direct contractor. My actual badge when I worked at Intel. This was not intentional at all, just a consequence of me experimenting with all the wack fields that they made you fill out in the HR site. This one never showed up anywhere else, just the badge. Nobody cared.
    3 points
  32. I have to say, I know Dan personally. He has some very sharp edges and it is very sad, because he had so much to work with, so much aviation talent and yet he applies it all in such a perverse way as to make himself an anathema to any well mannered and thoughtful person. I think he has some personality problems that really need professional attention because no normal person acts as irrationally as he does, even for money.
    3 points
  33. This is the same sad old story that those who lord over this site don't want to hear or talk about. It drives up insurance rates and just continues to make Mooney's almost uninsurable for new pilots. New purchase - not purchased earlier in the year as @Yetti suggested Registered May 28, 2024 in purchase from owner in Prescott AZ Plane relocated from Prescott AZ to David Wayne Hooks in Houston on May 10-11 https://globe.adsbexchange.com/?icao=a0b1bc&lat=32.042&lon=-105.643&zoom=6.9&showTrace=2024-05-11&trackLabels&timestamp=1713648404 Appears to be a new Pilot. Registration is to an LLC. The name listed as the LLC Principal appears in FAA Airmen as a new Private Pilot - SEL dated 7/5/2023. Lots of what appear to be training flights between Hooks and other airports starting May 12 https://www.flightaware.com/live/flight/N144BY/history/80 New pilots are enthusiastic. Enthusiasm sometimes clouds judgement. Yesterday N144BY flew what appears to be Touch and Go's at Hooks (don't see any other T&G's at Hooks before this - may have been first time pilot tried it) Yesterday was not a great day to fly. - something called a Tropical Storm in South Texas was moving in. KDWH was just on the edge of the weather. At 20:10 there was no wind and ceilings BKN 41 - maybe when he arrived at the airport. But it changed rapidly KDWH 192100Z AUTO 05009G17KT 10SM SCT043 SCT050 BKN060 30/24 A2989 KDWH 192055Z AUTO 05009G14KT 10SM SCT041 BKN050 BKN070 30/24 A2989 KDWH 192053Z AUTO 05014G25KT 10SM SCT041 BKN055 BKN070 29/24 A2989 RMK AO2 RAE02 SLP120 P0000 60009 T02940244 58019 KDWH 192050Z AUTO 05011G19KT 10SM FEW036 BKN043 BKN055 29/24 A2989 KDWH 192045Z AUTO 05010G18KT 10SM FEW036 SCT043 BKN055 30/25 A2989 KDWH 192040Z AUTO 04006KT 10SM FEW036 SCT043 BKN055 30/26 A2990 KDWH 192035Z AUTO 04006KT 10SM FEW036 SCT043 BKN055 29/25 A2990 KDWH 192030Z AUTO 05007KT 10SM SCT039 BKN060 BKN080 29/26 A2991 KDWH 192025Z AUTO 05003KT 10SM SCT041 BKN060 BKN080 29/26 A2991 KDWH 192020Z AUTO 04003KT 10SM SCT041 BKN055 29/26 A2991 KDWH 192015Z AUTO 06003KT 9SM BKN041 BKN055 29/26 A2991 KDWH 192010Z AUTO 00000KT 10SM BKN041 28/26 A2991 If you listen to LiveATC for Hooks while he was in the pattern you will hear the tower warning that winds were pretty steady at about 10 kn from the east gusting to over 20 kt. The runway is 35L. It looks like winds were gusting to 25 kn as he turned base. If you look at Flightaware it appears that the crosswind was blowing N144BY through the centerline of 35L. The picture makes it appear that the gear are up - no big ruts plowed into the grass but I suppose that they could be sheared off out of sight.
    3 points
  34. In addition to everything @EricJ accurately summarized, he has literally made an entire social media career out of disparaging (often deceased) pilots out of often incorrect snap judgements about accidents. He also repeatedly insults, bullies, threatens, lies about others in the aviation community using his youtube channel as a platform - then quickly takes down the videos that become legally problematic and/or are proven patently false - he wasn't fast enough in this once (the Charles Cook case) - and got burned with a large civil defamation judgement. Ask Mr. Cook and many of his other targets about the hell they went through because of Gryder. He has personally called up the employers of countless folks who dared to stand up to him and tries to get them fired - this behavior continues to this day. He also solicits donations to a bogus "nonprofit animal rescue" and "aviation safety foundation" he runs from his legion of fanboys (who all think he's just charmingly rough around the edges) - really I think this all goes into his personal account. He is a special form of scumbag narcissist (an otherwise overused term that truly applies here). I do not wish ill upon any pilot, but I cannot accept DG as a just a flawed human peer. Truth be told, I would have chuckled had the tree that Electra hit decapitated him and reconsidered my view of the universe as indifferent to justice.
    3 points
  35. Yea just an undeserved OWT. Sure it's not a super cub. But man I'm still a Mooney Rookie, I've had my F about 100hrs, I'm no ace but with just minor braking I can make the first turn off at my home strip consistently which is 1500 feet, I'm always off the ground in reasonable time, and once in the air the ground falls away quickly... So a 2500 strip should do me just fine if need be. There are more untrue OWT about Mooneys than almost any other make and model. The problem is when everyones experience to begin with is a Skyhawk that will behave quite well even flown sloppy is it creates habits in folks where the problem is their habit, not the plane.
    3 points
  36. ^^^^^^This. I was an independent consultant, and my clients didn’t care how I got to the job sites as long as they weren’t charged for commercial airfare above Coach, or charged for long (8 hour) trips by car. Of course the clients knew that I carried liability insurance on my aircraft, plus my consulting firm had E&O plus general liability insurance, so if things went south they could point the Plaintiff attorneys at me. I enjoyed those instances when my colleagues who arrived at a site by commercial air would complain about how their departing flights were delayed for hours due to flow control, Wx, etc. I was happy to tell them that my flight was on time, and would be departing shortly after I arrived at the airport.
    3 points
  37. I would start by double checking the compass system to the wet compass on a compass rose. That should give you an idea as to which system is off. If the issue is the KCS-55A compass system, possible components that could be a problem would be the KG-102, KMT-112, KI-525, slaving accessory. There are adjustment pots on the slaving accessory to help align the system. The adjustments for the slaving accessory are for N/S and E/W. If the system was consistently off around the compass card I would say adjust the KMT-112. If only 2 points (N/S or E/W) were off try adjust the slaving accessory. If you need help troubleshooting the system give Ronnie Tucker a call (Onsite Avionics) 713-254-9367. He is based out of Willis TX and has a mobile service. If the KG-102 needs to be evaluated contact Jerry at Porter-Strait in Tulsa OK. Unfortunately, we do not have the capabilities to repair the KCS-55A compass system.
    3 points
  38. Everything looked basically normal until he was about halfway down the runway. Then he departed to the left. Unfortunately someone dropped the camera. On Beechtalk there is a lot of discussion about whether the tail wheel (spinning 360) should have been locked. https://imgur.com/gallery/gryder-electra-UVWwTk8
    3 points
  39. The 20:1 / 40:1 ONLY applies to the Dukes (and similar ITT) actuators which use a worm and wheel gear arrangement. The problem with them is that the gears are small and heavily loaded. The moly grease helps reduce friction and thus wear, and the 40:1 retrofit gears are less heavily loaded than the original 20:1 gears to further reduce wear. Eventually the gears will wear out and there are currently no replacement parts available. The Eaton (a.k.a Avionics Products, Vickers) and the similar Plessey actuators use a spur gear train that is less heavily loaded and I have not heard of issues with gear wear on these actuators. The Mooney electric gear has no mechanical up locks. Something has to keep the gear from falling back down when in the retracted position. The worm and wheel gear arrangement cannot be back driven, so the Dukes/ITT actuators naturally hold the gear retracted. But the spur gear arrangement on the Eaton/Vickers actuator needs a brake which is the infamous noback spring. There have been a handful of noback spring failures in the field, most in Plessey actuators. There was one bad batch of Eaton noback springs that was recalled long ago and probably none exist in the field today. Don Maxwell told me that the Eaton noback spring is rated for 20,000 cycles. The 1000 hour replacement interval seems arbitrary and chosen because of a couple of failures or Plessey springs at around that time in service. But, time in service is meaningless. It is cycles that is important. Currently there are no new noback springs available. If it were my airplane, I'd keep the Vickers because I believe its a more robust design. It would also probably be a lot of work to source the parts and switch to the Dukes emergency retraction crank system.
    3 points
  40. As @PT20J said, throttle and mixture full in when priming. ~4 seconds when cold, a little less when it’s warm outside. After prime, reset mixture to cutoff, throttle just open enough so you get 1000 rpm when it starts.
    3 points
  41. Someone I know once did that, but was strongly cautioned that during discovery if things go pear shaped, this might just seal the deal for the plantifs, as it will be found out as most misrepresentations are.
    3 points
  42. My two M20Js both required about 4 seconds of prime when cold. Make sure the throttle is open when priming - it affects the fuel flow when near idle.
    3 points
  43. I've done lean of peak takeoffs before. There was this competition at our local airport where you had to fly to someplace about 25 miles away and the north about 5 miles and then back to the airport. I kept doing the math and I came up with 2.3 gallons. Which was less than every other plane including a 150 and a Kitfox. They laughed when they read the number and I said well fill it up and will fill up when we get back and we see you full of it or not or Whatever. Anyway, he checked one tank and it was still full and then he went to the other one and put in 2.3. But yeah, the airplane will do 23+ nautical miles per gallon down at 100 miles an hour. I even had a passenger. It was a lien of peak takeoff with the mag check done just before break release and at 500 feet brought the power back to about 20 inches and then at 1000 feet. It came back further to about 14.
    3 points
  44. I go Lean of Peak on downwind doing traffic patterns.
    3 points
  45. Thanks everyone - I'm set for Thursday
    3 points
  46. It depends on your company. They may have a policy of reimbursing actual expenses (airline ticket, car rental, hotel, per diem) or if they are Ok with you flying (fuel plus uber or car rental). There's no law that says anyone has to reimburse you $1.74 per mile. The IRS may allow that amount as a deductible expense or some agencies may reimburse that amount, but your company isn't bound to do that. The biggest obstacle is that they may not want the exposure of you flying "for the company". They could be named in a lawsuit if anything happens since you were representing the company.
    3 points
  47. I've been casually researching/studying for a while now as I plan to build on an airpark in the not-too-distant future. The door system is an engineered product that that is more complicated than a building, and IMO that is why there are a variety of door types and manufacturers to satisfy a dizzying-array of possibilities. The rest of the building is easier IMO, but subject to local codes that a function of location (think wind/snow loads, etc). Beware that there are any number of steel building "companies" that may be re-selling some other building kit, and may or may not erect them or subcontract that out. You'll want to know all of those details before making a purchase. My baseline is a single-panel hydraulic door versus a bifold. These are supposed to be structurally self-contained and thus won't impart any loads on the building... I like that as a structural engineer. I like the hydraulic drive versus electric motors and cables or straps like my current rental hangar. Although the bifold is light years better than the crappy sliding doors I had in my first rental hangar! The hydraulic doors typically have a manual drive to use in a power outage situation, which I think is a great idea in my part of the country and especially where we'll be building. Other details to consider... construction type (wood or steel frame), baggy insulation or structural insulated panels, concrete finish, in-floor heating, etc. How much power do you need, and where do you need it? What are the restrictions in your area? A hangar can be a simple pole barn with a dirt floor, or a highly engineered concrete bunker style with a shiny floor, or a beautiful timberframe masterpiece. Would you build on your own dirt, or leased at a public airport? If the latter, what are the terms? How will you use it? (multiple planes, sub-lease some of it, include an office) I'd like room for multiple planes and would like to rent a space until I can fill it up with my own fleet someday. I want room for a lift for cars and a Mooney, with enough ceiling clearance. I plan to build my home office into one end/corner with a mezzanine storage above, as well as a bathroom and room for a small fridge & wet bar, TV, etc. I'd like in-floor radiant heat, and a floor drain for washing operations. I also want 220V service for the mill, air compressor, hopefully a welder some day, etc. Other tidbits I've gleaned... hangars come in two sizes: "too small" and "not big enough." Some advocate for sizing a hangar to fit the largest possible plane that might be able to operate on your field to maximize resale value, and include a door big enough as well. That is good advice if your budget supports it, but there is a big difference in a hangar for a single Mooney versus a G700... My site has a modest runway so no jets, but I want to make sure I can fit a King Air, or a Cessna on amphibious floats as two extremes. That decision sets the minimum door size, and then the building is designed around it from there. You might want a separate overhead door for vehicles, and a conventional entry door to go in and out easily without opening a big door and letting the heat (or cool air) out. Anyway, there is a lot to consider! I've outlined my dream build but haven't drawn it up yet, much less gotten any estimates that might crush my dream.
    3 points
  48. Devin, @PT20J gave you the most concise answer to a few of your issues. Don’t pull back rpm, just lean to takeoff egt in the climb (which should be ~1200-1250 as @Shadrach noted), disregard the 1500 egt as that’s pretty meaningless, the 380 cht is a nice high limit (but is only a technique) but you will definitely get above that if you let the egts creep up above ~1250 takeoff egt during climb, 2500 rpm is a nice cruise rpm unless you really want to go slow trying to burn the least amount of fuel. Finally, why not open your ram air boost much earlier? I wait about 1000’ up and make sure I’m in clear air, but no reason to wait until 11,500. It lets the engine breathe better and gives about .75 more mp. Finally, at 11,500, your engine is making so little power that you really can’t hurt it. Play with it to validate what I’m about to say… level off, set 2500 rpm, slowly lean just watching your egt. They will all rise as you lean. Keep leaning right through whatever numbers you previously looked for. The egts will all “peak” at some value and start back down. The chts will lag but also rise until the egts peak and then they will start down. Keep leaning and the engine will eventually get rough but chts will be very low. That’s too lean. At 11500, you should be right around peak and still have good chts. If you want to cool them more, go leaner and they will cool, richer will increase chts until you get richer than about 50rop then they will decrease again. I flew my F at 11,500 last weekend for ~475nm at peak egt. Cht was 360 for the hottest one. Egt value is meaningless but it was around 1400. Fuel flow was ~8.6ish. It’s not super fast like that, but at ~140kts, it’s not bad either.
    3 points
  49. You don't want the transponder to transmit without a load, so if it doesn't come on unless the avionics bus is on, that's one safety. You can also turn it off or pull the breaker to keep it from transmitting. Ground mode may work, but I don't trust it. Many of the more modern transmitter designs include input protection for the power amplifier, so this is not an issue for them, but unless you know that a particular device has that it's best to be careful.
    3 points
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