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  1. Since most of their employees have been there for years I'm sure they are compensated fairly or they would have left. There's a huge difference in thinking to work for someone else or to own a business. Many people want to punch a clock, collect a paycheck and not have the responsibility. The fact that they would offer the opportunity to the employees first before selling it to someone else says a lot.
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  2. My shop is starting to fill up with Mooney cowling mod parts. Two shiny things arrived today for the G and then F model that I'll be modding soon.
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  3. Finished up my dual time and got to fly solo in the Mooney yesterday. http://intothesky.us/2017/01/14/last-cfi-flight-first-solo-in-the-mooney/ Then today I got to go flying again this morning, this time in the right seat of @MHemperly's "E" as the safety pilot while he was shooting approaches for his IFR currency. I was glad he asked, I had a great time and learned a lot. Here's a few pictures from this morning.
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  4. Flew to Camarillo for breakfast this morning from KAJO with my beautiful family. Met up with a couple other friends that flew out of the high desert KWJF. It was a bit bumpy but all in all a great flight. And Waypoint cafe is always a treat!
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  5. After many moons of looking I purchased N5756Q. 1/11 Aircraft PPI - Foothills Aviation Curtis was great to work with and pointed out most things that the owner had already shown me. Discovered shock disks were older than I thought and some hoses should probably be replaced at next annual. Alternator or Regulator needed replaced. KX-155 needs repaired. 1/12 Closed Deal 1/13 Worked with owner and A&P to replace voltage regulator. 1st flight and checkout with CFI that afternoon. 1/14 Avionics orientation with previous owner and then first leg of solo ferry IYK-PRC. 1/15 PRC-PVW then PVW-GYI. 1/16 GYI-GSP (VFR to IFR) then GSP-FAY 1/17 FAY-2W6 Lots of discovery learning along the way but otherwise uneventful cross country during the middle of winter and contending with Winter Storm Jupiter. I'll try to write up a more extensive trip report some time later. Can't thank the members of this forum enough for the valuable knowledge that is archived on this site. Thanks to Pam Roach and Shelly Parker of Bank of Locust Grove. Mike Jacobs of First Pryority Bank. Al Nur of AOPA Insurance. Curtis at Foothills Aviation KCCB. William Hickle Aerospace at KIYK. Brian Cepaitis (CFI) at Farris Aviation at KIYK. All the great folks that I met at the FBOs along the way. Great turns at Legend Aerospace at KPRC. Super friendly crowd at Rocket Aviation KPVW. Jaimey was super helpful getting a place to stay at KGYI and the line rats were very patient with a new owner. Watch out for the fuel prices at KGSP as they have a new owner and the 100LL prices on WingX Pro are wayyyy off. Lots of Hooah at KFAY. Lastly - Thanks to Ken Reed at 2W6 who met me plane side within 2 minutes of landing to show me the hangar and a tour of the facility that is now home (again) to 56Q. I've logged 18 hours in less than a week. Tons more to learn... 56Q Needs - Little spots of surface corrosion on main landing gear - needs fixed up. Must find a place that can replace the shock discs at a fair price. Needs new hinges for nose gear doors. I would like to find a replacement baggage door arm. I would like to start replacing hoses that are old and have no date tags but otherwise functional. Downlock block should probably be replaced as its 52 years old and I would like a little peace of mind that I know its not worn out. G430 is non-waas but am I really going to be flying in conditions that need 200 foot mins? And like most...ADS-B in the next few years. Pics to follow...
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  6. V2.6 seems to have done the fix so far. 4 short flights and no leaning. I hope this holds.
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  7. LASAR is in a very rural setting and I believe that their staffing truly likes the lifestyle there. Plenty of talent, with great competency, but I can understand a reluctance to take on the running of business aspects. Some years ago my father decided to retire from a very successful wood crafting and design business he founded at the end of WW II. He had about 28 employees then, all experienced craftsmen. He offered to GIVE the company to the employees if they would keep the business running. He offered to pay the legal expenses for the change in ownership, and that he would train anyone of them to act as the chief executive, and would draw no salary while doing so. He was proud of the company, and simply wanted to reward his staff for all their hard work over the years. After a host of meetings, the employees asked him to sell the company to someone who would keep it running- they wanted a secure paycheck, and not ownership responsibilities. He did sell the company, but in two years the new owner ran the company into the ground, and ultimately closed the firm. To answer a question, I was not interested in taking over the company as I had my own pathway to follow. I can't imagine owning my Mooney/s without LASAR, and especially Paul's advice and skills that proved so correct over several decades. Dan with his parts knowledge (and his good natured "we can find it" altitude) is simply irreplaceable. I hope Paul and Shery can find a qualified buyer, but I suspect it will be difficult. I wish Paul a speedy recovery. From conversations with his staff I know that even now he is in daily contact, and very much in charge. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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  8. There is no replacement for displacement. That being said, you went on a single round trip flight, in one J model, with another pilot flying who may or may not know how to get the best out of his airplane. My observations would be the following: 1) If I owned a J model that trued at just 150kts at 7000ft, I would be investigating what the problem was. 150kts is the bottom of the barrel for a J model unless he was LOP in which case he should not have been burning 10GPH at 7000ft. That's where I flight plan my box stock geriatric F model and I often see more. 2) Getting the most out of an airplane requires planning. In a true XC situation, one would climb high to sip fuel with the best tail wind and return lower out of the strong winds. You seem to be inferring that 11,000ft is "Ovation Country". A J model is extremely usable in the 10,000ft to 15,000ft range. Climb rate starts to drop off above 12,500ft but a good J should average more than 500FPM in a climb to 12,000ft. 3) The actual TAS difference between a well performing J and R at max cruise is about 25kts making the R about 15% faster in a race. The difference in fuel burn is about 5gph. This means that the R is burning about 50% more gas at max cruise. If you think that cross country block times will be 15% faster, I would bet that is highly optimistic even on longer trips, on short trips you get bragging right for landing a few minutes earlier and burning a lot more gas. Unfortunately, I would bet that block fuel burn will be 50% more for the R all other things being equal. 4) Useful load. I don't know the exact numbers for either specific plane, but both of the Rs I am familiar with weigh in at near 2400lbs with a useful of about 965lbs. I contrast that with my lowly 200hp F's dry weight of 1681lbs with a useful of 1059lbs. Let's compare a 500nm trip for a typical couple in both planes with 45min reserves. Using numbers for my F model pilot and spouse - 305lbs bags - 100lbs Fuel - 240lbs Aircraft dry weight 1681lbs Total payload and fuel 645lbs Total weight 2326lbs (note that loaded for the trip my plane is lighter than an empty R model). Power to weight ratio is .086hp for every lb. For a typical R Model pilot and spouse - 305lbs bags - 100lbs Fuel - 317lbs Aircraft dry weight 2395lbs. Total payload and fuel 722lbs Total weight 3117lbs Power to weight of .09hp per lb. Not really a huge power to weight ratio benefit for a normal XC mission. If the plane is being flown solo, then the P/W spread is greater, but you should understand that the 180 and 200hp machines do quite well when flown solo as well. Plenty of folks seeing initial climb rates of well over 1200fpm when flying solo in the cooler months of the year; great climb rates are not solely the purview of the big Conti's. I can often hold greater than 1000fpm all the way to 8000 in the cool months. 5) I'm not so sure that any long body has superior short field performance either in or out when compared to a 200hp mid or short bodied bird. Check your POH and compare. I believe that at gross weight as well as lightly loaded, the R is going to use more runway when compared to the lighter short and mid-bodies. My POH says a 200hp F will have a take off roll at MGW on a standard day of 880ft. Configured for the above mentioned 500nm XC trip the POH says 595ft at SL on a standard day. I am not trying to poo poo the big Conti-engined birds. I think they are great machines, especially if you fly alone a lot and don't care much about efficiency. I don't see them as the fire breathing muscle machines that some make them out to be. I think if one studies the performance specs, one finds an honest plane that goes somewhat faster on a lot more gas. With regard to the J model, I am trying to think of a certified, production 4 place aircraft that goes faster on a gallon of gas and nothing comes to mind...unless I include turbos. A good K model 252 will do better. In fact a 252 will hang with a standard Ovation above 10K and walk away from it above 15K...all while burning less gas. You might consider spending a bit more real world time in the J (maybe rent one if you can). I think you'll find that while the performance differences are significant, they're not quite as dramatic as you are portraying them to be.
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  9. DM, I made a tow from a used Hoveround electric wheel chair 6 years ago. I found the chair on Craigslist and gave $160 for it. I built a hitch (tongue) for it and installed a 2 1/2" ball on the foot rest of the chair. I attach the hitch to the plane with a round metal rod that extends completely through the nose wheel attach point. I'll post a picture or two. Sorry for the poor quality. By the way, the chair has plenty of power to tow the Mooney with me sitting on the chair. I can tow the plane nearly as fast as a person can walk if necessary. There is a slight learning curve to operate it. I'll have to admit, I get some very funny looks from people who see me moving my plane with a wheel chair! I also used to have a Challenger II Experimental. In order for me to hangar it in the same "T" hangar with the Mooney, I built a lift for it using a walk-behind forklift. I got the forklift on eBay for $480. I built a fork extension for the plane to sit on. I raised the Challenger about 6' and the Mooney fit under it without any problems. I used it for 3 years or so until I sold it along with the Challenger.
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  10. With that smirk on your face, you're starting to look like the rest of us dirty old men.
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  11. Last night was fun. It really is true that Mooney's attract the women. My girlfriend invited two of her friends to come to dinner with us. The two backseaters have never been in a plane before. I almost had to hit the intercom isolate button they were "oooohing" and "awwwwing" when I rotated, banked, and saw the sunset and moonrise. Flew over downtown Jacksonville, then swept down the beach down to Flagler. I made THE BEST LANDING IN MY LIFE. Nice cool air, ~60*F, absolutely no wind. Approach was ROCK solid. Transitioned to a "flare" and held it...held it...and just felt the tires start rolling. No screech, no plunk. Just perfect. The ladies thought that was normal! haha.
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  12. I'm off to a good year. With the headwind trip back from Florida and flight testing the Lancair, I already have almost 20 hours in this year (will be over that before today is done). I will fly 2 hours this AM to finish off my 40 hour test time in the Lancair, and will take my building partner and best friend for his first flight in the plane he must have close to 1,000 hours helping build (no passengers allowed during Phase One Testing). Here is the only picture I managed to take yesterday. I had the power pulled back to a measly 27.5 gallons an hour going into the wind, seeing 135 knots GS, and pushed it up to cruise power going down wind (winds howling pretty good out of the west yesterday). I just couldn't resist seeing what she would do with a tailwind. I heard center calling me out as VFR traffic (verified by my ADS-B too). I have to wonder what he thought seeing me at 133 knots west bound and almost 400 knots east bound? Tom
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  13. I have been innoculated against G. A. S. ! Having spent my early professional life around old airplanes owned by underfunded companies, I can say with confidence that I am now immune. I've learned just how much utility can be had with minimal equipment. I certainly admire all of the whiz bang stuff you gents buy, and if I had unlimited AMUs, my plane would rank with the best. Sadly, I'm nearing retirement and find myself in a position similar to those companies I flew for many years ago. Therefore I must fly with what is there in the panel, and surprisingly, the job gets done, just as before.
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  14. Hi I'm Robert, and I own an airplane.... Isn't that they way group therapy starts?
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  15. Let me be the first to throw the wrong answer in the ring... 1) I know that one day my cognitive skills and or my physical skills are not going to pass the test. 2) I know that somebody else is going to want to make that decision for me. 3) I know that there is going to be some fighting to put that day off as long as possible. 4) I have seen plenty of physical therapy and seen some cognitive therapy work up close. 5) I work with people trying to regain these skills after injuries. 6) I am impressed with what I have learned from these fine people... 7) Eat right, get physical exercise, fly like Bennet into your eighties... 8) Continue with your cognitive exercise... reading, writing, puzzles, whatever you like.... 9) Use a desktop flight sim, they make great cognitive exercise equipment. 10) Only retire when you are ready. One day you will wake up and say, 'I just don't feel like it' 11) in the mean time select the right days for flying... 12) A few MS members have had health issues. Nothing like cardiac arrest or brain issues to make you reconsider your flying lifestyle. These people have found ways to keep flying... 13) If it is only getting older driving the decision, I would add some focus to the physical and cognitive exercise and consult a food specialist to work on dietary needs. We have one at our local grocery store that works with customers with their special needs... 14) when you find an exercise that works, add a way to measure your skills. Count the reps, use a timer. You will be able to tell a good day from a not so good day. There are also fitbit devices that can help you with counting exercise and how good your sleep is. 15) If you haven't given up smoking yet. Today would be a great day to start. Consult your doctor, some of the meds are paid for nowadays.... 16) not being able to fly is in the plan. Not being able to drive is worse. Not being able to walk makes things really difficult. 17) if all it really takes is to eat right and exercise to keep flying, I would consider joining a gym, jog on the inbetween days, read a lot of MS and fly the MSFT FS, but I'm not there yet! 18) never give up, there is going to be another day with something important to do. 19) Risk analysis... only you know if it is worth it. If there are people depending on you to be alive you have more things to consider. until that day, fly on! Positive thoughts coming your way... Is that the kind of thing you were thinking? Reminder I am only a PP, not a therapist Best regards, -a-
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  16. Here's my initial thought process on how I'll do the mod process. I'll send out a box designed to fit the cowling pieces ( upper cowl, lower cowl and cheek panels). In this box will be the baffling, carb air box, spinner and backplate if necessary, and misc hardware. The customer will pack his cowlings in the box and send them to me. While the baffling etc is being installed at your hangar, I'll mod the cowling and then ship it back where it can be painted and striped if necessary then reinstalled. Engine mount shimming can be done for final alignment to the new cowling. I'd like to control the cowling pieces being installed and fitted. It's not that others can't install them, but it's my reputation on the line and not everyone will take the time to get it as close to right as possible. Thoughts? Thanks, David
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  17. And you should let them believe that they are always like that. When you have one that isn't perfect and they're in the plane you just say, "Sorry, every now and then I have one that's like that."
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  18. There are lots of life insurance policies that will cover pilots and don't have exclusions for GA. AOPA is only one of the many options.
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  19. You forgot the part about arriving in style. Guess you haven't been to many Mooney fly-ins. Instead of measuring body appendages, we measure gadgetages. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  20. Hi N6758N, I've only done my cowling so far so no really good estimate on hours yet. I will have a better idea after I do the G and F models soon. I'm thinking of just having a flat rate for the cowling work itself. That way I can give a pretty firm price on the cost to install. C and G models will take less time to mod the lower cowling than E's and F's as there's less structure to remove. I think potential customers would prefer to have a solid number and remove any labor variable. Thanks, David
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  21. It's not really feasible to determine flight weather with much accuracy by driving. Hard rain doesn't stop me from flying. For flying you're looking more at freezing levels, TSs, etc. I've flown through rain that was intense and it's not too big of an issue other than some turb. Even the turb and winds at altitude are going to differ from what is on the ground. Depends on the pilots experience, rating etc. Cant arm chair this fairly from a minivan on the highway.
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  22. This reminds me of the Mexican fisherman story... An American investment banker was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them. The Mexican replied, “only a little while. The American then asked why didn’t he stay out longer and catch more fish? The Mexican said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs. The American then asked, “but what do you do with the rest of your time?” The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siestas with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine, and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life.” The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and could help you. You should spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the proceeds from the bigger boat, you could buy several boats, eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then LA and eventually New York City, where you will run your expanding enterprise.” The Mexican fisherman asked, “But, how long will this all take?” To which the American replied, “15 – 20 years.” “But what then?” Asked the Mexican. The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich, you would make millions!” “Millions – then what?” The American said, “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siestas with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos.” ------------------------ Suffice it to say I am mid 50's, retired from my 1st business at 46 and am trying not to work so hard on my current business. My current "job / businesses" is saturated at one weekend a month, we tried years ago to expand but it just degraded the quality. I did the whole story above, made the money but now prefer to sleep late, fly a little, play with my kids and sip wine in the evenings. So far I have heard many good reasons to get an IFR rating, but since I am older it is a tough decision especially since I prefer to fly low and slow and smell the aroma of the fields and villages. If I was 10 yrs younger, I'd have it done in a week!
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  23. I am not sure I agree to the whole "trusty magneto" but that said I am having electronic ignition installed in my mooney right now. Lightning strike - yeah ok. sure but you also probably should reevaluate where and when you are flying. I also fly behind two turbine engines both of which have electronic controllers. I personally think that the fear of new technology has continued to hamper development for our airplanes. We should have all been flying behind electronic ignition in the 90s and today should be something way cooler and smarter and more fuel efficient.
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  24. wheel wells painted. Door trims painted. I love the last photo, it looks as though she is flying
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  25. Its more than just being able to fly on a cloudy day. For most IFR rated pilots, we will tell you its a learning course in being a safer pilot. Doesn't mean that not having IFR you aren't safe, but you pick up skills sets that will help you in all of your flying. To include VFR in VMC. You learn a different set of skills. Just like when you learned T/W or aero. Neither of which is really a Mooney skill set - but I bet you learned some precision landings in the T/W and that will carry over to the Mooney. Aero - learned how to make the aircraft do exactly what you wanted to do. IFR - its the same, you will learn precision flying. MDA of 720 ft means 720 ft. At the end of the day you can fly VFR all you want. You can even fly IFR in VMC, in my Mooney I currently restrict myself to at least 3000/5 which is very conservative. I also know that when the weather is not as forecast I am going to be ok. For me - thats worth 10k.
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  26. Feb issue of Plane and Pilot has a list of great used planes to buy. Mooney 20F Executive was listed. Great advertising and vote of confidence.
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  27. The sad reality is that the value of the STC's is in decline with a shrinking fleet that is also perpetually declining in value. Sent from my VS985 4G using Tapatalk
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  28. I attended Cleon's memorial service last month here in Longmont. He was indeed a great meteorologist, pilot, instructor, builder, and - most importantly - friend. He taught all the partners in our Mooney in one capacity or another - basic transition training, instrument ratings, even my CFI. One of the last conversations I had with him was regarding an issue with a student, and he was helpful as always. It was a privilege to know him, and to have flown with him. You'll all be pleased to know Cleon was flying right up until a few weeks before he left us. He recently completed building a Rans S-19, which was as impeccably constructed as you might imagine. A friend of his who also built an S-19 spoke at length during the memorial, about how valuable Cleon had been helping him construct his airplane, and fly it thereafter. There were many pictures in albums at the memorial of Cleon's life in aviation, flying everything from that S-19, to Learjets, with a couple of Mooneys in there, too. Cleon was a great role model as an aviator, and the local aviation community was well represented at his service. For those of you so inclined, Cleon asked anyone wishing to remember him consider making a contribution to EAA chapter 43: http://www.ahlbergfuneralchapel.com/book-of-memories/2791439/biter-cleon/obituary.php But as great an aviator as Cleon was, he was an even better person. Cordial, humble, informative, helpful, everything we aspire to be. I miss my friend, and I grieve with Toni and the rest of his family. Godspeed, sir.
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  29. Hello everyone, apologies for the delay in responding on this. this issue is related to higher vibrations levels in the plane, especially if it is mounted to a floating or shock mounted panel. in some of the cases these shocks have been found to be worn and replacing them is also an option to try and prevent this. remember this is a non TSO'd product and even though we did test it to some of these TSO levels it is not tested to some of these higher vibration levels. but the 2.6 software release was actually tested per some helicopter requirements and corrects most of these issues. let me know if there are any other questions,
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  30. We just bought our first plane (M20E) and my daughter got to see it for the first time on her 1st birthday. She's on the path to be the 5th generation pilot in our family!
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  31. I would rather be a safe well practiced VFR guy with IFR training and rating.
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  32. I don't know what it is like there now, but we lived there from 1980-84 and my dad flew HC-130's out of Elmendorf with the Air Rescue Squadron (before the Coast Guard took over Search and Rescue stuff). He's told many stories about searches for downed planes, hearing the ELT, and making multiple passes over the area until they found it. Without the ELT they never would have found the plane. He just recently finished reading a book called "Looking for Alaska" and in it the writer talks about a plane wreckage up on the side of a mountain in Miller's Pass. My dad was flying a training mission through Miller's Pass when they heard an ELT. They made multiple runs up and down the pass looking in the bottom before noticing the plane up on the side of the mountain. They called in the helicopters and PJ's and the pilot was saved. Without the ELT that pilot would have died up there, nobody was even looking for him at the time. Of course back then there wasn't any technology like the spot units. I'm all for using every bit of technology there is available. Not sure what Paul uses, but if you sign up and file it on www.1800wxbrief.com you have the option of opening and closing a flight plan through text or email. I have an Android tablet and use DroidEFB which will send my plan to 1800wxbrief.com, I don't know about Apple and Foreflight but I would assume that it integrates as well. You can sign up for alerts about your route and get them sent via email or text. You also will get an email/text prior to your planned departure time with a hotlink in it that you can click to activate and then close your flight plan. It's a pretty cool service.
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  33. Wisdom! As the owner of an "pretty much as built" C, I am constantly amazed at how adequate 1974 technology is at getting me where I need to go efficiently and reliably. Instead of adding countless expensive speed mods, I live next to my plane saving more time per trip than 20, or 30 extra knot$. I added a 430W because I had to. (NDB and VOR approaches disappeared). Other than that, I don't need no stinkin' technology. I'll let my well-funded employer buy all that gee-whiz for his planes.
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  34. Nothing wrong with your thinking at all. Wait a sec! You're the guy that convinced me at Oshkosh that I needed new LED wingtip and belly strobes. And then, a few months later convince me to buy the tail strobe! You're the devil! It's an addiction man. I was fine for years. I added a few essential minor things in the first 7 years of ownership, then in 1998 an autopilot and the urge subsided. Then in 2012 the disease came back and it still ain't run its course! Meeting you at Oshkosh, I think we share the same philosophy of improving what we own. I promised myself that after the ADS-B update, I would slow down. Hmmm... I do however still need to finish that interior. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  35. More comprehensive information source here but apparently : http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2017/01/mooney-m20j-fatal-accident-occurred.html Although what happened isn't all that clear other than likely VFR into IMC. One thing it illustrates all too well is that days can go by when a plane goes down without a flight plan filed. The planes was believed to depart KTSP on Thursday morning the 12th headed for KTOA, and the search effort didn't even begin till Tuesday evening the 17th and then found the wreckage site morning; apparently an hour after they started looking this morning, Wednesday the 18th. These days it's so easy to activate and close a VFR flight plan on the runyway with a smart phone by clicking in an email message or text message. No radio calls necessary, just the click of button with data access on your phone or ipad. But it makes so much difference from a SAR perspective. It may not have made any difference in this scenario except for the pilots family. But imagine surviving the accident only to perish from lack of timely first aid because no one was looking for you. Flight following won't get the search team out either unless you get a mayday off.
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  36. Been buying something from them just about every annual. It's nice to call their parts department and say "Hey you know that thingy that goes in the....." and hear back " you bet I got one and I'll get it to you overnight". I don't know their parts guy but he must know every nut and bolt that belongs in a Mooney. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  37. What on earth is complicated about the Mooney hydraulic flap system? The biggest problem with the hydraulic flap system is that it requires so little maintenance, that few folks have experience servicing them. Mooney specific shops get to service them occasionally. If you've heard they are complicated you've been misinformed.
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  38. I have been in the Mooney community for only 2 years now, and live on the opposite coast and so have never been to LASAR personally. Despite that, I have gotten invaluable assistance on the phone from them, including with parts and mods. I would have hoped a business that provides such excellent and somewhat unique service to the Mooney community would also be profitable and appealing for someone to keep going. I am saddened to think that might not be the case.
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  39. Richard (Rich) Jones Glad to meet ya.
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  40. I was shocked and saddened when I opened up and read the latest issue of the MAPA Log and saw that Cleon Biter “Flew West” last month after a battle with cancer. I’ve known him since I first started teaching for the Mooney Pilot Proficiency Program as a new Mooney instructor over 20 years ago. He was one of the best pilots I have ever flown with. He was one of the first Master Flight Instructors. As a meteorologist, he really knew and understood Weather, and every time I taught for the PPP and would sit in and listen to his weather presentations I learned something new. After one PPP in Jefferson City a number of years ago, he took Wayne Fisher, another great instructor, and me back to Kansas City where we got our flight back to our home cities. He flew with perfection. While in the FBO I asked him to review how he did a preflight weather briefing. We headed to the computer and he took the time to detail how he did it. Since he was in Colorado, I recommended many students in his area to get their transition and other training from him. I always got positive feedback from them. The flying community and especially the Mooney flying community lost a great teacher. He will be greatly missed…
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  41. that they aren't paid well enough to be able to afford it?
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  43. Although a go around is rare for me, I have still done them, one within the last year (in my Mooney, got several in the Lancair). Hank's advice is dead on. I have made zero opinions on the negative side when I see a pilot elect to go around. It clearly demonstrates good decision making by the guy behind the yoke. Tom
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  44. Another good write up, Richard. The next time you are fast on final, just hold the plane off in the flare, keep the nose up and stay centered on the runway. You will experience the Mooney float, just don't let the wind blow you to the side. Expect about 100' of float for every 1 mph you are fast . . . Eventually the excess speed will bleed off and you will land. So don't do this if the runway is short. Having the wisdom to do a go around is a good thing, not something to be embarrassed by. If something isn't right, go around and try again, that's how pilots stay alive and airplanes stay undamaged.
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  45. And an F with manual gear is the best buy of all IMHO Mooney should have never strayed from manual gear again IMHO or at least offered manual as an option. You still can get a car with manual transmission though very rare.
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  46. Once again a great example of an owner, admittedly not a tech guy, opens his cowling and finds something that could have been disastrous. I am going to work on a video soon that I’ll post in my blog area that shows what an owner/operator, who is not an A&P, can do as an extended preflight. It will be a de-cowling and we will point out what to look for. Someone did this for me, so I want to pass it on.
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  47. It appears the Dynon D10A and D100 now have an STC for all Mooney M20s. http://www.eaa.org/en/eaa/aviation-communities-and-interests/pilot-resources/eaa-stc-low-cost-avionics
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  48. Clarence: With only 50 gals on board, we will run the tanks dry before we can get airborne.
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  49. Version 2.60 should take care of that. That being said I think these make great backups, a good replacement for the Turn Coordinator if you don't have an S-Tec autopilot, but there's not enough history to make it your only attitude indicator. http://www8.garmin.com/support/collection.jsp?product=K10-00280-00
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  50. Just added another notch in my plane ownership belt. I'm on my 26th year of owning the same Mooney. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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