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  1. I did four cowling modifications initially when I started my project. I’m still working on two different cowlings but am in the process of moving right now. Many other issues with composite shops have hampered progress for quite a while but I am too far into it and too much money invested to walk away from it. Thanks, David
    5 points
  2. The tbm is a really nice plane. It is a completely different class from any piston, and even the meridian. It is built like a military plane. It is solid and quality everywhere. I was surprised at how tight it is for the pilots, and you miss the position of the Mooney as well as have limited recline on the backs of the seats, but I logged some time in one, flying to Alaska and back from south Florida.
    5 points
  3. We disassembled mine in January of 2020 and had it in the air by July. My case was fretted and no longer airworthy so I jumped on the refurbished case from Divco. I was fortunate to get all of the parts before the major supply chain disruption, including the new camshaft and DLC lifters. Cylinders, gears, rods, pistons, and everything else were serviceable. I removed the engine and but nothing in the field overhaul and engine assembly itself, but I did the entire installation by myself with oversight and sign-off. I learned a ton about my airplane, and I cannot place a value on what I learned. All in, it was around 25K.... with a lot of sweat equity. Since then we have made multiple long haul trips including my eclipse trip with a stop in Destin FL. This is my longest adventure, over 2,500 NM round trip.
    4 points
  4. I have seen this airplane in stages of completion and it is a “better than new” Ovation in every possible way. With Steven’s attention to detail and Brian’s workmanship you will not find a better Ovation on the planet. You couldn’t come close to duplicating it for the asking price.
    4 points
  5. My interpretation (I'm an engineer in the industry working on new products) is that the IA has the authority to determine major/minor according to the regs. Using factory approved and produced parts goes a long way towards nudging many things we're discussing towards minor... such as adding the wing sight fuel gauges. They are supplementary, and independent of the primary fuel quantity system, so that should be a slam-dunk minor mod, especially using the Mooney parts. (Weep No More added mine during reseal long ago with a logbook entry). NORSEE was written with this kind of logic too for safety-enhancers like AOA systems that are independent of the existing pitot-static system. Adding later model Mooney factory seats also falls into this category...they're already certified, they fit, so just install them with a logbook entry and W&B update. We did this with my throttle quadrant deletion modification... I took all of the factory Mooney parts from an 81 J and retrofitted them into my 77 J.... minor mod. I did NOT engineer new engine controls or do other crazy contortions, I just used factory parts. It should be the same way IMO for a J cowl retrofit, although at that point there might be a minor nit using J parts going on to an E or F... but I suspect many IA's would be fine with it. With the VARMA regs and the unobtanium ram air duct, you could perhaps twist some logic into supporting the mod to delete ram air and use the more efficient J airbox and cowl without the ram air hole, which Mooney even deleted themselves towards the end of the line. That is a safety and reliability improvement in my mind to get rid of a leaky duct that will pass dirt into your engine and perhaps clog a fuel injector.... For those that are on the never-ending path to improving our great vintage airplanes, I encourage you to not give up! There are logical reasons to do so, and there are still (almost) reasonable paths to accomplish it if you're using the right mindset, and have a good relationship with your mechanic/shop/IA. It helps to be a DIY-er too b/c paying for a lot of it does NOT make economic sense. It is a hobby for me, and (mostly) enjoyable so I don't mind doing the work myself with supervision. I also don't do anything crazy or stupid. The regs were not written to keep our planes stuck in the 60s or 70s until they become completely unsupportable and unairworthy.
    4 points
  6. Interesting side note. Statistically this pilot was super lucky. The fatal accident rate for the Lancair is 10X the GA average and ~ 40X that of the ubiquitous C172. That data came from the Lancair Owners and Builders Organization.
    4 points
  7. If there were no injuries and everyone walked away I wouldn't second-guess anything you did. Good job! You did everything right.
    4 points
  8. I'm pretty sure it's impossible for Lm/n to be 5 inches greater than Lm/r. I have a page for the nose gear steering adjustment from the a M20K SMM, not an M20J, but I think it's the same. It says that the nose wheel axle centerline should be no more than 0.06 inches forward of the trunnion leading edge, measured with a plumb line. It's interesting that the difference in your diagram is exactly 5 inches, the same number as the trunnion distance from the reference datum. Measuring Lm/n is easy. Measuring Lm/r requires that a plumb line be dropped from the trunnion centerline. If we assume that Lm/n was accurately measured and Lm/r was not measured and is off by approximately five inches, your actual CG would be somewhere around 44 inches aft of the reference datum. I suggest that Lm/r and Lm/n be re-checked. Pages from MAN134 SMM M20K.pdf
    4 points
  9. Many keep it very simple: Full throttle and full forward prop pitch for takeoff and climbout. For cruise, pull the prop back to 2500 rpm. Lean as desired. Throttle stays full forward. Reduce power as necessary for descent and pattern entry, prop goes full forward once power is pulled back enough in the pattern to not affect rpm.
    4 points
  10. Today flying from Eastern Maryland back to Alabama, I was forced by icing to take a more southerly route. Took this photo looking south-southeast towards the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. The Patuxent NAS is lower right. Horrible turbulence and headwinds all they way to the GA-AL border after which things smoothed out a bit. The shocker of the day happened when CLT approach allowed me to fly over the field at 5,000.
    4 points
  11. Years ago I was flying home and while planning my flight realized there was a 70knt tailwind at 25k, directly on my tail. Pretty hard to pass up in a plane capable.. I was alone, had the nice blue silicone mask with a microphone, so I filed for 25k and off I went. I was cruising along and I looked down in my lap and saw this little black disk. At the time the plane I was flying was an ultra with the precise flight conservers, and I thought the disk looked like the adjustment dial on the outside of the unit. After a few seconds of fiddling with it, I realized I was trying to put it back together, but it wasn’t apart…. By the grace of god I realized that what I was doing made no sense whatsoever and I engaged the vertical descent for 1400fpm and still to this day do not recall the next two or three minutes. What I do recall is being level at 8,000 ft with atc calling me asking intentions. I hit replay on the g1000 and listened to me responding to them and taking instruction. I did not sound like myself, but I was responding. I do not remember any of this… After my wits were about me again I looked down and realized my arm had gotten wrapped around the o2 hose going to my mask and had inadvertently pulled the grommet out of the front of my mask at 25,000ft. The disk was the grommet, and if one was completely cogent, would never had mistaken it for anything else. I don’t know how long it had been pulled out, or how long it took me to notice something was wrong. The flight recorder only goes back about 2.5 minutes on a constant loop, so that’s all I could listen to. I don’t know how long the entire event lasted, but I did realize how close I came to being a bad story. There is certainly more elevated risk at those altitudes, and one must be very vigilant, aware and have some routine to check yourself very regularly. I personally stay 19k or below if I am alone, and will only go to 25k with someone else and if we pick up enough time to really make a difference. This isn’t my recommendation or suggestion, it’s merely a personal minimum in my Mooney, or any non pressurized airplane. Things can deteriorate much quicker than you would like to believe… Last thought on this story… I was embarrassed by this. I felt foolish, like my arrogance and confidence led me to a bad choice that could have killed me. I finally opened up and told the story to a pilot friend of mine and he told me I should share, because perhaps someone could benefit from hearing my mistake. I sure hope it does, because I still feel foolish.
    4 points
  12. FWIW, if the retard points have worn to where they aren’t opening, that would cause the same symptoms. Either way the solution is under the point cover. It is just 4 screws that are easy to get to.
    3 points
  13. 3 points
  14. Took theses with my iPhone from my driveway today, totally blacked out here:
    3 points
  15. I bought the Redline. I like it a lot. Not for CBs though. But I learned from my wife's uncle who framed a stock certificate he owned from a company that went bust and across it he had written "Always buy quality" as a reminder.
    3 points
  16. Thanks. My Son’s purchasing the aircraft — I’m just assisting with the DD and cost is definitely factoring into the equation.
    3 points
  17. My parents didn't buy me a bicycle . . lol. I had a paper route and earned it myself.
    3 points
  18. I think the big take home point is that everyone responds differently to various oxygen equipment, different flight levels, and even from day to day (hydration, caffeine, poor sleep, overall health etc.) High flight and oxygen use is a risk that can be mitigated and minimized with proper planning. But it will never be zero like pretty much everything flying. I consider pulse oximeters and hypoxia training to be minimum price of entry. How can you know that you’re becoming hypoxic if you don’t understand what that looks like. How can you verify minor changes if you aren’t routinely monitoring your flow, pulse ox and equipment? Regarding cannulas above 18,000 or when to start using oxygen the FARs are a starting point but you should verify this yourself with the equipment you intend to use. From what I understand, the FARs were originally designed to allow the GA pilot to navigate mountain passes effectively without oxygen in most GA aircraft. But 12,500 feet or 14,000 feet is not a minimum physiological standard. Some people are fine WELL above that and some are not so good WELL below it. Best thing is take a buddy and a pulse ox up and verify how it affects you. With a nasal cannula I start to need increasing flow rates above 16-17k and its really ineffective above 18k…even it if was “legal” for me it’s a no go. The higher you go the lower partial pressure of oxygen is, without a nose and mouth covering you entrain more low oxygen content air with each breath. At a certain point it’s like adding only a spoonful of mix to a gallon of water and thinking you’re making lemonade. For me the MH O2D2 works well with a boom cannula on D10 (delayed turn on at 10k) up to 16k. At 16k I turn to F1 (lowest face mask setting) up to 18k. I use the MH mask above that and had to tweak the mic to get it passable and it’s still not as good as boom mic. But for me the MH mask on F1 is excellent for oxygen sat and keeps me at 98% at FL250. Get a CO detector and get a pulse ox (I keep one in my flight bag and a second hung always on the prop knob). And get good ones (or two!). As a doc I feel that anyone flying above 10k should have a pulse ox, for them and their pax use. But KNOW how to use it, how it works for you and what the limitations are. And get in a habit of using it regularly both for habit and for forming your baseline. It will make recognizing deviations a little easier.
    3 points
  19. Might be time to put it on the scales and get an accurate weight.
    3 points
  20. More likely that someone made an arithmetic error 20 or 30 years ago.
    3 points
  21. If all he does is just the obligatory insurance-mandated transition hours with a CFI in the Ovation, he may OK, or he may learn some bad Mooney habits. Depending on what part of the country you live, @mike_elliott (east coast) or @donkaye (west coast) would provide excellent transition training. The number one new Mooney pilot incident is a porpoise then a prop strike on landing, These guys will help him avoid that.
    3 points
  22. Don't take this the wrong way but if those lines are so old that you are cautious about handling them then maybe its time to replace them. I've seen fuel pressure lines so old they just bust like spaghetti when removed. One had a date on it of 1963. It was well over 50 years old for a rubber hose carrying pressurized fuel. Be cautious and check the dates Not something one might want to cheap out on. The other line that most forget about is the hyd line to the flaps under the cabin. Have seen several that were date of aircraft manufacture. It can be challenging to change but it has to be done to keep our fleet going.
    3 points
  23. Considering the frequency of prop strikes by both Mooney and TBM pilots, the Ovation is probably an excellent choice to build retract time and learn to protect the nose gear on landing. -dan
    3 points
  24. Yes, the ovation would be an excellent choice. The Mooney flies a lot more like the tbm than the cirrus. Get good instruction, be serious about the training, and learn the Mooney and its idiosyncrasies. I completed my ppl in an ovation and moved straight into my IR in the ovation. it is a great learning platform.
    3 points
  25. I use a method suggested by Richard Collins. If it’s gusty, the airspeed bounces around. Just adjust pitch so the lowest airspeed indicated as it bounces around is your normal approach speed for your weight.
    3 points
  26. Make sure they followed the procedure in the POH exactly. Large CG shifts are usually an error.
    3 points
  27. I would start with warm water, time to soak, and then something like Wash/Wax All
    3 points
  28. What I find interesting is that the vast majority of airframes seem to perform quite acceptably with the original settings that Garmin determined during certification. Some that have problems are probably unresolved issues with the airplane or installation. But, as I understand it, a few have gone through extensive investigation and everything with the airplane and installation seems correct, yet they still have problems.
    3 points
  29. I have used the time tested method to improve speed. Wax, stickers and lying on the internet. Much cheaper than new engines and real speed mods and you can add probably 20 knots. Ha ha
    3 points
  30. If you were on the wait list for LASAR to order an intake duct they should be contacting you if they haven't already. If you weren't on the list you have about 1-2 weeks to place an order before they submit. Yes, they are expensive and it is a 35-week lead time... They are also placing an order for the E/F which is a different part number 600115-005. This is the email from Heather at LASAR with the information regarding the B/C/D/G Models. "I have you down on my waitlist for an intake duct part number 600064-000 (B,C,D, G Models). We are about to make a purchase for these and need to know how many customers want to place the order. There is going to be a 35-week lead time once the order is placed. The price of the ducts stays the same at $672.00. If you want to place an order, we are taking deposits for half the price of the duct up front of $335.00 and once the ducts are ready to ship we will charge for the remaining cost. I’m attaching a copy of the order form that needs to be filled out and emailed back to me at this email. If you are uncomfortable sending CC info, you can leave that part out and call me on my direct line for that info (541-398-7430), all other information needs to be filled out on the form." Her email is heather@lasar.com.
    2 points
  31. Newer avionics have fans and/or heat sinks. I have had mine capped for years and never had any issues with newer avionics even in AZ in the summer when it's 110°+ on the ground.
    2 points
  32. Savvy Breakdown, which is now included in the lowest tier (SavvyAnalysis?) of paid subscription, has been useful to me twice. I'm an involved and knowledgable owner but I'm not a mechanic so having a number to call for assessment and recommendation saved me from two AOG situations away from home. Knowing I have them to recommend a good shop if I need one away from home is good piece of mind for me. I don't subscribe at the SavvyMX level but I probably would have benefitted from it earlier in my ownership. I do recommend the SavvyAnalysis level subscription for the regular Report Card and FEVA Reports, as well as the detailed engine data analysis available on request. Cheers, Junkman
    2 points
  33. Just make sure you have a good Concorde battery. Friends don't let friends fly with Gills.
    2 points
  34. If you want to use the AV link, check that the software already in the unit supports it. I tried to use it to update mine, only to find out that it didn't, and trying wiped the operating system on the AV-30. Fortunately, I'm used to working with Cisco and Juniper network appliances, which also shit out their OS at the first sign of trouble, so I was able to get the uAvionix tech support guys to walk me through putting it into bootloader mode and putting the OS back into it with the serial cable. I wouldn't recommend doing it yourself if you're not already quite comfortable with getting into the angry ones and zeros. Sent from my Pixel 5a using Tapatalk
    2 points
  35. Strangely, this happened to me on Don Maxwells ramp. I was looking at my current Mooney. I talked to Don on the phone, but he never came out. It was a Sunday afternoon. He didn’t have any thing to add. I pulled the P-lead cover off the mag to look at the points and found the shorted wire. I just pulled the spade terminal off the points and rotated it 180 degrees which pulled the wire away from the case. It worked fine after that.
    2 points
  36. Heads up all. I just placed an order with LASAR after being on the wait list for several months. Heather is taking a 50% deposit via credit card. Estimated 35 weeks lead time. If you foresee needing one, recommend calling her now: Heather S., Lasar Inc. 541-398-7430- Direct Line 707-263-0412, #2 Parts Dept.
    2 points
  37. A good friend used to say "Buy the best and cry once."
    2 points
  38. When I did transition training into my Lancair, I was told the only time you should be below 80 KIAS is when the wheels are on the ground.
    2 points
  39. Every time I had Hector do an interior he would take all of the screws and poke them into a piece of cardboard and spray the heads with matching paint. It's a small detail but takes your eyes away from the fasteners and makes you focus on how nice the interior is.
    2 points
  40. Did they level the plane per instructions by letting air out of the nose tire and then marked the datum correctly? Otherwise it's a waste of time if the nose wheel is not positioned correctly
    2 points
  41. Retract time? Here's a GREAT choice. No 'complex'ities to distract from the main task: making sure the gear is down for landing! The 4 GPH and sliding canopy are just side benefits!
    2 points
  42. Another great Mooney CFII on the west coast is Paul @kortopates
    2 points
  43. I have had a number of clients move on to TBMs after they have owned s long body Mooney. They both are "numbers" planes and behave very similarly. A few have gotten their PPL in the Ovations and Acclaims and paid the big bucks for first year insurance premiums. One Boeing fellow bought an Ovation for his son in lieu of college as he wanted to be an airline pilot. He currently is flying for netjets professionally. Lots of ways to skin the retract time cat, but not too many better than in a Mooney
    2 points
  44. On BT, Trek says the following. These two or three sentences are surrounded by several paragraphs of assurances, but I think this is the nut: "First thing to address is the difference in the servos. No, the GFC 500 and 600 servos are not the same and just in different packaging. I won't go into every detail, but I can assure you they are different. The GSA 28 (GFC 500) motor is a 30 watt motor and the GSA 87 (GFC 600) is a 50 watt motor and that is about as close as they get at that point." https://www.beechtalk.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=195816&start=15
    2 points
  45. Approximately 475 students x 50 landings on average = 23,750 landings with students over 32 years. Then about 2,000 landings in 4,523 hours in my airplane. Total landings made = 25,750 to a good approximation. Then one landing video made. (https://donkaye.com/landing-video} No arrogance intended, only that I've done so many landings and experienced many ways they can go wrong, that I've learned over 56 years of flying my preferred way to land and teach landings. 50-100 feet is too high to take your eyes off the airspeed indicator. Assuming I'm reading the next highlighted in red sentence correctly, this implies "dropping" into ground effect and holding the plane off until it is ready to land. While this techniques may give a good landing, it will also extend the landing many hundreds of feet, since the holdoff is occurring in ground effect. The best landings are made when attention is paid to BOTH airspeed AND slope. When practical (no obstructions), the slope should be 3° for a comfortable descent rate and an airspeed of 1.3 VSo for the aircraft weight should be maintained. The slope and airspeed should be maintained to about 10 feet agl, where in smooth no wind conditions power should be smoothly withdrawn to idle and the flare should be begun at such rate that the nose of the plane transitions from a 3° nose down attitude to the landing attitude of about 8° where the wheels are "rolled" on with the stall warning horn going off. As the aircraft descends from 10 feet at a decreasing rate of descent, at least 2 stripes on a centerline runway should always be in view--all the way to touchdown. The nose of the airplane should NEVER be so high as to obstruct the runway. The "art" of the landing is practicing the rate of flare to dissipate ALMOST all, but not ALL, the energy at touchdown. This allows for a controlled touchdown with minimum runway used.
    2 points
  46. Maybe you're having difficulty with your landings because you are too concerned about your airspeed indicator. Sure, check it on each leg, but once you get 50-100 feet above the ground, just look outside the plane and fly it. Slowly add back pressure to round out just above the runway and then hold it there as long as possible. It will land when it's ready at whatever speed is right for the given weight. On the flip side, you can almost guarantee a bad landing if you are checking your airspeed while over the runway.
    2 points
  47. Flew Rouen (LFOP), France to OldWarden (EGTH), UK for the Easter Bunny Flying and visit the museum collection Propper British grass root flying: soggy, wet, grey with greasy food…the Mooney hates it, the kids love it
    2 points
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