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  1. Are you asking if you can legally put a picture of a mooney logo in your mooney? Mooney can barely stay in business. I dont think chasing people that make a logo and put it in their own airplane is high on their list. Just do it.
    7 points
  2. A public forum is probably not the best place to negotiate a price on an airplane
    5 points
  3. Recorded a landing in my Ovation with strong 15 tk winds as well as gust factor which I do not remember. Turned out really nice! Chris
    5 points
  4. I've experienced this a few times in other airplanes. It sounded like your transmissions were broken, yet somewhat readable. To rule out a failure of the Capt. side PTT...start with these: Reach over to the F/O side PTT and see if that works. Switch radios (assuming you have more than one). Use your handheld microphone (assuming you have one). Try using a handheld comm radio, like a Yaesu, Icom, etc. (albeit, this has limited range if not connected to an aircraft antenna). Squawk 7600 so ATC knows you have a comm failure and can manage you accordingly. If I may, a couple of unsolicited pieces of advice based on your video... When clearing a runway, announce "clear of Runway XXX" rather than "clear of the active". Too many people use "the active", and it's really annoying, not to mention procedurally incorrect. Regardless of how many runways are in use at any airport, everyone needs to know where you are. They cannot assume - nor should you expect them to know - what "the active" is if they haven't landed or taken off yet, as a runway can change any time. When you were asked to keep your speed up on final, you acknowledged it, and made a comment about "landing long". There is no such thing. The proper term is "a long rollout", and it's something you should ask ATC for permission to do, as they expect you to turn off at the first-available and suitable runway exit. Without asking them and getting it approved, you may be forcing other traffic on short final behind you to go around unnecessarily. Lastly, if you're not comfortable with accepting an ATC instruction to keep your speed up on final, go around. Forcing the airplane to slow down quickly only helps de-stabilize the approach, which can lead to bad things. Hope this all helps. Good luck with the PTT issue, and let us know how it turns out. Steve
    5 points
  5. My Executive has been hangered it's whole life and the exterior paint leaves a lot to be desired. However, the airframe is clean and corrosion free. I don't really care what anyone thinks of it. It's safe, operational and has an excellent dispatch rate. It's purpose is to shepherd my family and stuff to different regions of the country at 150kts. I could not give two $hits what the pilot lounge, coffee club curmudgeons or a potential shopper thinks of it. It’s not for sale. It’s a tool for travel.
    5 points
  6. Referring to "Key" numbers: 3 of any combination of MP in inches or RPM/1000 is approximately 10% power when ROP. As opposed to gliding, turning down the RPM is analogous to shifting down in a car. The engine is running the prop, not the other way around. When under power the engine should run the prop for less wear and tear on the engine. When gliding, as in engine failure, you'd like to reduce drag, and in that case you'd like as little drag as possible and the prop as close to feather as possible. As mentioned above in another post, it's efficient to go as fast as practical in the descent to make up for the loss of time in the climb to altitude. So, if it's smooth, I'll descend in the yellow arc, otherwise the top of the green arc or maneuvering speed, if turbulence is a factor. Regarding the 165 knot limitation in the Bravo, that's with the gear down, and is an irrelevant number in the normal descent, since the gear will be up. Until in the pattern, the MP should never be set less than 15" to make sure the engine is running the prop. Slope of descent makes a difference in power management. A "slam dunk" should be flown differently than a normal descent. So, for efficiency, I'll descend as fast as practical when VFR, and that means knowing the rate of slow down of our airplane and importantly managing your fastest cooling cylinder head temperature to keep it below the 50°/minute limitation on our engines. I have it as a data field on my MVP-50 engine monitor. When I do start reducing power, I'll gradually reduce the MP to 20", then reduce the RPM to 2000. The MP will increase a couple of inches with reduction in RPM. I'll be monitoring the fastest cooling CHT to keep it below the 50°/minute limitation. Then I will further reduce the MP to 15". If a faster descent rate is then necessary, I'll add speed brakes, but I leave that to last because of the inefficiency it produces if you add them too soon and then have to add power because your descent rate was too great. Of course the gear comes down in the pattern, but adding the gear too early is VERY inefficient. In my opinion this is the way a descent should be managed on all the Mooneys (less speed brakes if a Mooney doesn't have them), no matter what has been written by anyone less familiar with the Mooney aircraft.
    5 points
  7. Since he's the only one in the country that we know of that's willing to work on these orphaned portables and panel mounts, we are probably better off not knowing.
    4 points
  8. Next time you have the cowl off check that it wiggles, i.e., the sphere isn't seized in the rod end. It may have seized and caused the bow when you pulled it, which prevented it from moving, and it let go when you poked at it. If it gives you any more odd feelings, maybe shoot some lube at it. Just a speculative thought.
    4 points
  9. You should find another shop to install this thing in your M20k. Your m20k….. Or continue to torture yourself in the unending morass of interpretation. seems like you will find the right answer while simultaneously finding the wrong answer. -
    4 points
  10. OK Cliffy, I may be in this category but not for the direct reason your stating. My plane has 7500 hours on the airframe, NDH, and has always been hangered. When I took over ownership it was in immaculate, however dated, shape. I have not put a dent in it since I bought it in 2017. I have taken it to a different shop every year but one for annual since I purchased it. Why? Was it the $3500 annual inspection fees? No. It was because every year I had to go through what some careless A&P had done and redo it myself with oversight. I have been fed up with A&P's in my area and it is very, very frustrating to pay someone $100 an hour to dick up my plane and have to do the work over again. There are too many things to list and I don't want to write a book but it has been items like the heim joint that attaches the governor cable to my brand new governor they installed was so loose I could move the arm over a 1/4, that's why my brand new PCU 5000 was wondering. I had new screws installed in my interior, they were too long and poked through the skin it made me absolutely sick. An oil leak developed at the back of the engine could it be the 2400 hours on the engine? Nope, the new vacuum pump that was installed three years ago was so carelessly installed they left some of the old gasket on the flange which made the new gasket leak, stupid and careless. There are many many more examples that I have and these are respected shops. Do you think I want to pay these guys $100 an hour to fix a leaky vacuum line on a brittain autopilot? No I'll do it myself when I get time. I do want to thank the people like M20Doc and several other that provide good advise on here it's helped me out many times.
    4 points
  11. I think the condition of the fleet has as much to do with shitty maintenance going out there as it has to do with the attitude of the owners. If you don’t want to spend much on maintenance, I’m sure you’ll find a maintainer willing to oblige. Water seeks its own level. Having read these pages for many years, I’m honestly surprised at the things you guys endure and tolerate from your maintainers. Maintaining an airplane is good condition takes loads of money and loads of dedication from both parties.
    4 points
  12. This is true. In the past, I had several bad experiences with mx facilities. Even the first owner assist I did was off putting. I pulled the flap pump and exhaust by myself. I walked into the office to talk to the IA who was everywhere but in the shop (at the FBO, riding his 4 wheeler around ,etc). He's sitting at his desk facing me and I kid you not, a pop up opens on the screen over his shoulder with some very graphic content. I did most of the work that annual while he rode his four wheeler, drank FBO coffee and wanked in his office. He did check my work and give me access to tools, though I was less enthused about touching them after the office incident . The inspection cost me $2500 plus squawks in 2006. I kept shopping and now have at least three solid guys that I can work with.
    4 points
  13. Our local flying club/ flight school is getting a Pipistrel electric airplane soon. The charging system is being installed now.
    4 points
  14. Update to the situation! I will NOT have to go to AK this time around. Good news as I just got the plane, hangar and I'm pretty involved locally with our EAA Chapter and other things. Pretty happy about that.
    3 points
  15. FOR SALE – 1987 Mooney M20J 205 – N205S Hangered in Colorado Springs, CO (KFLY) Personal plane that we have flown for 100 hours in the past 13 months. Expect 162-164KTAS on 10-11gal/hr. This plane is fast, efficient, and fun! The “205” got the 252 mods without the turbo. It has the 2900lb gross weight increase (976lb useful), 28v electrical system, one piece belly, inner gear doors, all speed fairings, improved cowl flaps, the higher 140kt gear down speed, preset 1st and 2nd notch flaps (15 and 33 degrees), and back seat frames that fold flush into floor for plenty of cargo space! Read the “remarkable 205” article online for more general specs. Most recent annual completed 13 February 2022 overseen by Savvy Mx Program; no squawks noted, compressions were 74/75/75/77, all spark plugs replaced. Previous annual, January 2021, completed by Don Maxwell to include rigging. Interior was completely refurbished during the 2021 annual and included all new interior plastics wrapped in ultra leather to match the exterior. The yokes and glare shield were done by Aerocomfort in San Antonio. The seats were done in the same chocolate leather with a Porsche 911 style of the same vintage. The paint was done by Cheyenne Airmotive in 2002 with a moondust base, oak brown striping, and a medium green acry-glo paint. The avionics were redone in 2015 and includes the large Avidyne 540 FMS/GPS/NAV/COM, tied to the Aspen 1000 PFD with GPSS steering, synthetic vision, wind aloft info, TAS, OAT, etc. connected to the BendixKing KAP 150 Autopilot. This setup allows you to fly coupled RNAV and ILS approaches, GPSS, fly a heading, altitude hold, etc. Additionally equipped with the Avidyne AMX 240 audio panel with Bluetooth, and Avidyne APX 340 transponder with ADS-B in/out capabilities. It also has a JPI EDM 711 Primary which gives you all EGT’s, CHT’s, oil temp, etc. with CHT and oil temp being primary. The FAR 91.411 and 91.413’s are in compliance and are due 11/30/2022. This aircraft has 3724 TT, 651 SMOH done in 2009 by Western Skyways (2000hr recommended tbo), 651 SMOH on the 3-blade Hartzell top prop conversion, and the oil has been changed every 30-40 hours with Philips XC20w50, camguard, spin on filter, and oil analysis with Blackstone Laboratories. Minor damage history (incident) in 1992 on the takeoff roll when the pilot struck a snow bank due to a frozen brake. Sale includes matching Bruce’s canopy cover, n-numbered chocks, and n-number cowl plugs. Asking $189,000. Private message or call/text if you are interested and/or need any additional information. We had not planned to part with this amazing aircraft so soon, but given some unforeseen health issues, I am unable to fly for several months and can’t bear to see it sit. Hope it brings the next owner as much pride and joy as it brought me. Ryan (406) 431-2310 N205S 1987 Mooney M20J 205.pdf
    3 points
  16. Many thanks, gents. That's a really sophomoric way for King to manage the rollout of a product with a documented demand curve. I'll just head over to Garmin and install the GFC500. It's ready to go without the fuss and confusion.
    3 points
  17. Hi Brad, Its still progressing although slowly. Too slow but at some point the log jam will break. Thank you, David
    3 points
  18. I’m currently having a GFC500 plus YD being installed. No issues.
    3 points
  19. Anybody worried about personal use of a related trademark or copyrighted material just look into "Fair Use" or the "fair use doctrine". There are many, many situations where permission is not required to use protected intellectual property like trademarks or copyrighted material. Personal use is usually one of them, especially if you apply the trademark to the item that the trademark belongs to, i.e., a Mooney trademark applied to a Mooney. I am not a lawyer. "Fair Use", however, is fairly easy to research.
    3 points
  20. Hush, hush project. It the new turbine powered, pressurized M20Z with a 4500 pound GW.
    3 points
  21. [emoji13] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    3 points
  22. It doesn't sound like you're overfilling the hub if you're putting in just a couple pumps/year and nothing is coming out the opposite fitting. It is worth knowing what grease was put in the hub at last reseal - generally its Aeroshell 5 (thicker) vs. Aeroshell 6 (thinner). I bet you have 6, which has a reputation for breaking down and liquifying, generating a thin sheen that gets past the seals (not heavier nodular chunks, which would be more worrying). With just a small amount of this leaking and the low hours you're flying, I doubt the hub is at risk of running dry of grease , so I would be in no rush to do another reseal job. I've been living with a similar issue for a few years now flying 100-150 hrs/year, adding a few squirts #5 at annual on top of the original #6 in the hub from factory new 11 years ago - it does immediately come out the opposite fitting for me. There is no problem with mixing the two greases.
    3 points
  23. Ok, just saw I'm being paged... I agree with @201Steve...find another shop if you own a Rocket and are trying to have a GFC500 installed in it. @Yooper Rocketman are you trying to get one installed? Where is this FBO? I just screenshot this from the Garmin site, highlighted for your reference. Mentions nothing about a Rocket being "specifically excluded". You will note if you go to that site there's an * after the Socata Trinidad and at the bottom it says "some serial numbers excluded"...so they could have done that here if there was an issue. in any case, I have a Rocket and my GFC500 is installed with a 337. If you need one, call AATG, I'm sure they'll be happy to do it for you. Stop visiting that FBO in the meantime...
    3 points
  24. Wow, Cliffy! Wake up on the wrong side of bed this morning? That's one depressing diatribe...again, what was your point? Trying to run more people out of an already shrinking GA population? To what end? I mean, the accident rate has not been getting worse. Hope you feel better, soon!
    3 points
  25. Yes, an FCU failure, none the less, ultimately, an engine failure at 500’ with no option for a turn back with the most ugly options with, literally, seconds to make the right decision to actually survive the situation. Tom
    3 points
  26. Yep, my thoughts too. Bottom line, no matter what you fly, don’t get complacent. The worst scenario can happen to ANY OF US!! Tom
    3 points
  27. Some are as you describe, but not all. The fleet is aging however, and isn’t being replaced, the FAA loves to talk about the aging aircraft “problem”, but statistics don’t yet reflect it, very few aircraft have accidents based on age, nearly zero. Insurence guys can speak to that, in fact I’d say the aircraft seem to age better than the pilots. Please don’t tell my 76 year old airplane or 100 yr old car they are rust buckets, they don’t know any better. I’m certain they will still be doing their job when I’m gone as my 41 yr old Mooney should
    3 points
  28. tornado ally sells a turbonormalized setup for a 390 in a cessna cardinal, i could only imagine that setup on a J after reading what it did on a cardinal.
    3 points
  29. You don’t need to countersink the plastic. Just drill the holes large enough that the dimple in the washer fits down into the hole. This will put less stress on the plastic than if a countsunk hole and dimple do not perfectly match. The flat part of the washer provides plenty of surface area to hold the lens.
    3 points
  30. This means you should consider getting a different mechanic.
    3 points
  31. Does your mechanic go through the alternative options with you? All of those parts could been procured for fractions of what you paid. I thought factory parts were mostly for insurance claims.
    3 points
  32. I used these in the past and when I had it in for an annual at a MSC they replaced them with cotter pins. Is there anywhere it is specified what can be used? I would love quick removals, especially when I need to get the co-pilot’s seat out for that special someone who takes up more real estate. [emoji13] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    3 points
  33. Rebooting this thread from a year or so ago. Angel Flight still needs good pilots. Last year it was COVID, this year its inflation and high fuel prices. But patients still need help. I have had some of my best and most enjoyable flights this year. On the subject of this thread, which was the 231’s flexibilty to meet the mission, I flew a transplant patient and his wife this year and the fellow weighed in at 295. I warned him ahead of time that Mooney’s have a reputation for being a little tight in the cockpit. We put him in the back seat and rolled the wife’s seat (co-pilot side) full forward. I flew the fella twice and he said it was really comfortable, he loved it back there. Then there was the flight where I met a pilot in Aberdeen who had flown a patient and her mom from MT. She was destined for the Mayo at Rochester. It turned out she had a collapsible wheelchair with her that AF West had not put on the passenger manifest. The incoming pilot flew a Citation so he just stuck it in the aisle. It didn’t fit in the aisle I don’t have in my Mooney. What to do? Well, with the help of the Citation pilot we collapsed the chair, got it through the passenger door, back into the hat rack and over the baggage compartment. It was too big to drop down into the baggage, just as well, I don’t think I would ever have gotten it out of there. I told the Citation pilot my stories about ATC asking me to slow a couple of times for the Citation on final ahead, he go a chuckle out of that. Got the passenger and her mom to Rochester without further issues, and the line guys at Rochester helped me get the wheel chair out. So if the question ever comes up whether your Mooney can handle a wheel chair there is your answer. I am going to go to AFC’s gala in November called Wine Flight, will anyone be there? I might have some family with me, would be good to meet up.
    3 points
  34. I have a 65' E. It's a great "couple plane". My wife and I are empty nesters now and ended up with an E model after selling our beloved Comanche 250. My plan when the Comanche sold in April was to buy a Cessna 310 (deice boots, hot props etc etc) but that deal fell through due to insurance requirements. I felt gutted since I had given up the 250. I ended up having this beautiful "E" come up (not advertised). It was a great decision to skip the twin Cessna and go with Mooney. I never felt the fuel price increase since it burns 4gph less than the Comanche and 14gph less than the 310. I do 150kts on 10-11gph, have the fold down rear seats (which are always folded), 4hrs range with reserves, and it's a great IFR platform. I do think it's a weird move to own both Turbo Arrow and an E Mooney though. Why now sell the Arrow and get a 231 with the engine you are already familiar with, TSIO-360?
    3 points
  35. The landing light lenses are polycarbonate and don’t crack as easily as the acrylic wingtip lenses. Still, the unibit is the best bit for drilling all kinds of plastic.
    3 points
  36. Get rid of the Arrow and get a J or a K and you’ll accomplish everything you want and then some.
    3 points
  37. TEAL71 is out there flying around the eye. They made a PIREP for extreme turbulence. Who could have guessed that would happen?
    3 points
  38. I have a customers AC100 on order and paid for. What I can’t fathom is BK had zero components available, even being 100% sure the stc was a done deal. The servos are all the same for all systems, the controllers are the same, the brackets and program settings are unique to the mooney. Makes me wonder if the pay 100% upfront is because they had no capital to continue produce parts and have them sit awaiting approval.
    3 points
  39. I will be taking a dirt nap before a practical x-country electric airplane is made.
    3 points
  40. I was just watching TEAL73 fly around the eye. In 30 seconds his ground speed went from 350 KTS to 73 KTS. OMG!
    3 points
  41. I asked Alexa for a pic of a Dutch roll…. I haven’t seen any of these in my Mooney… Best regards, -a-
    3 points
  42. We have gone from never going to happen… To a small electric kri kri crossing the English channel To a twin motor multi seat corporate plane looking device… In only a few years… Who would expect Harley Davidson to build an electric motorcycle? In the business news today… Harley is spinning off that business…. An electric Mooney would be awesome… 1k+ UL, 1k+nm range, 190kts TAS… or better… Set some goals… then crush them on the way by… Go Mooney! Best regards, -a-
    3 points
  43. I'd wager that there will be no next Mooney. Certifying a new type is too costly.
    3 points
  44. I thought it was a phenomenon specific to swept wing aircraft, but I would swear I've experienced it before my C model. At the very least, the short bodies don't have the best yaw stability. If I ever upgrade my 2 axis STEC-30 to something modern, I'm going with the yaw damper option for sure.
    3 points
  45. I’ve only rented a Turo once but I liked how the platform is set up. You take photos of the car, the dash, the fuel gauge, etc. You pay through the app and Turo keeps a portion of 15 to 40% depending on the level of “protection” you want, kind of like insurance only they don’t call it that. I would like to see the option, on Turo, of being able to rent it for less than a day. I’m not sure that’s an option. But maybe something like being able to rent it for 2 or 3 hours to go get lunch or run an errand. And the deadbeats you mention would certainly be a concern of mine. I also believe that doing it right might involve registering the car under an LLC to protect you and not registering it in your own name.
    2 points
  46. I see this argument tossed out a lot, and I'm not really here to change minds. But it's worth pointing out that people who change their oil twice as often have twice as many opportunities to get bit by bad parts and/or maintenance-induced failures: bad seals, bad torque, missed safety wire, stripped threads, etc. Changing your oil more often isn't without its own set of risks, and if unlucky, you could wind up overhauling a lot sooner than you otherwise would have as a result. Just saying "oil and filters are cheap compared to an overhaul" is a naive approach to cost and risk management.
    2 points
  47. Did the same. Thanks @flyingchump! Replacing the rollers with the new ones he made from Delrin make my seats roll like biscuits and butter. All my rollers were stock except one. Annual before last the shop that did my annual wanted to replace the seat rails because they looked worn. Ugh. That would be a major pain y mucho dinero. I said no. After replacing the rollers, after that annual, the shop did not flag the seat rails as a problem this time.
    2 points
  48. For years I’ve thought a factory Remanufacturing process would be a reasonable option for Mooney. Standardizing full airframe inspection and refurbishment, tank reseal, panel, cowling mods and paint would be great but to make any money, you’d have to be able to make 50k per airplane and I’m not sure you could make the numbers work. The IO390 answers a question that no one asked. It’s all sizzle and no steak. A better idea would be to work with Tornado Alley Turbos to add the Mooney airframe to the STC’d TN system they certified for the C177 Cardinal. A factory refurbed TN’d and intercooled mid-body with the 2900lb MGW would be the performance leader in class but it really would need BRS to be competitive. It’s a dream though. The market is shrinking. A great many teens and 20 somethings hardly want invest in a driver’s license much less learn to fly. I hope that changes.
    2 points
  49. Here is a pro tip for you IFR filers that i find works well for me including when I’m flying for an airline. when you get the dreaded ready to copy reroute phase, open up flight aware app and put in your callsign. At the bottom of the page you will see your filed route and 9 times out of ten it’s your new reroute flight plan. I showed this to a first officer the other day as we had a reroute from LAX to DFW and he really liked knowing what alphabet soup characters were coming beforehand so as the controller rattled them off it was very easy to check and verify instead of wondering what the next point was going to be. out of the dozens of times i have used this method, twice i have had a different route in flight aware that was different than our original but not what clearance delivery gave us. So it’s not guaranteed but great for when it works which is most of the time.
    2 points
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