rob47v

those remarkable mooneys

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Might anyone have a copy of those remarkable mooney's. Going on a cruse in the first of June, looking for something to read of my interest, but the for sale copies are crazy stupid expensive. I wouldn't mind renting it, but I can't find it as a rental. 

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These seem to be harder to find than gold . . . I have tried. I still don't have one.  Good luck.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, N201MKTurbo said:

I have The Complete Guide to Single Engine Mooneys by Paul Garrison. I've never read Those Remarkable Mooneys.

How is it? Is is worth finding one?

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4 hours ago, Southernpilot said:

I just bought one for $68.00 from an Italian dealer through ABEBooks.com

Vince

Vince,

Thanks. I went to the site and now the cheapest one is $95.  I have a hard time justifying that price.

Anyone else have one that they are willing to part with for a reasonable sum?

Thanks,

Fernando

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4 hours ago, milotron said:

How is it? Is is worth finding one?

I think it is a good book. The only problem is it stops at the 231.

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  Well, this surprises me.....   I bought Those Remarkable Mooneys a number of years ago and haven't even gotten around to reading it .   I'd better take better care of it !    ;)

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39 minutes ago, milotron said:

Is it an historical type of narrative or is it more technical in nature?  Sorry for the questions...

If you are asking about "Those Remarkable Mooneys", it is mostly historical.

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On 2/26/2017 at 3:22 PM, N201MKTurbo said:

I think it is a good book. The only problem is it stops at the 231.

I just checked my copy. It goes to 1997 and includes the Ovation and TLS (Bravo). I agree most of the details end with the M20K. 

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On 2/26/2017 at 8:53 AM, milotron said:

How is it? Is is worth finding one?

The value of a book is subjective. The most useful parts for me were the realization that serial numbers overlap between models and the explanation why the Chapparal is heavier than vintage M20E. The bulk of the book is historic edutainment, including anecdotes about TBM and MU-2. But you aren't getting the same kind of model-specific ownership lore from Remarkable Mooneys that Cessna 150 owners get from Mike Arman book, for example.

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On 2/26/2017 at 10:53 AM, milotron said:

How is it? Is is worth finding one?

I have or had a copy that I got used on Amazon.  As I recall, the information is pretty dated. References to shops and mods no longer in existence. Pretty lousy operating advice by todays standards. I read it through once, but never felt the need to reference it again.  I think it went with the last trip to the used book store.

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I have a question. What are pilots using for performance data that are out of the range of performance charts? I have a 1966 E model and the performance charts stop at airport elevations of 5,000’.
Vince


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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2 hours ago, Southernpilot said:

I have a question. What are pilots using for performance data that are out of the range of performance charts? I have a 1966 E model and the performance charts stop at airport elevations of 5,000’.
Vince

The Performance Charts for my C model go up to 12,500 msl; the Takeoff Table only goes to 5000 msl. So far, the highest airport elevation that I have been to is KCOD at 5100 msl, but the runway was well over 8000' long, much longer than I needed.

How do I know my takeoff requirements there? Experience, judgement and the Rule of Thumb:  be at 2/3 of takeoff speed by the halfway point of the runway. 

Flip to the back of your book, there should be a section labeled Performance Charts. You can always look up the available Full Throttle power at the field DA and see how much power you've lost compared to your home field . . .

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The Performance Charts for my C model go up to 12,500 msl; the Takeoff Table only goes to 5000 msl. So far, the highest airport elevation that I have been to is KCOD at 5100 msl, but the runway was well over 8000' long, much longer than I needed.
How do I know my takeoff requirements there? Experience, judgement and the Rule of Thumb:  be at 2/3 of takeoff speed by the halfway point of the runway. 
Flip to the back of your book, there should be a section labeled Performance Charts. You can always look up the available Full Throttle power at the field DA and see how much power you've lost compared to your home field . . .

You bring to light my first mistake. I’m interested in takeoff and landing performance and not because I’m unsure of the airplane, I’m pretty certain it will do it. I’m just trying to plan a trip and make it 100% legal and safe when the ramp check comes.
Thank you for your response and I’ll keep researching.
Vince


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Mine has three temperatures at each of if three altitudes. You can always plot them on a graph and extrapolate, then add a safety factor. How high is your planned destination?

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Mine has three temperatures at each of if three altitudes. You can always plot them on a graph and extrapolate, then add a safety factor. How high is your planned destination?

6,349’ and 7,095.


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SP,

Great question...

M20C POHs continued to improve every year... up to about 1977.

Make sure you have a copy of the most recent POH.  Check the download section, or call Mooney directly...

The challenges of performance charts...

  • they are not very linear
  • on the edges things get less trustworthy...
  • Edges as in... high OAT, or height GTOW, or high field altitude...
  • Things that effect how much excess HP is available and how much lift can be generated...

To make sure your pilot/plane are performing with respect to the POH data... you can collect your own data and compare actual vs expected...

I use a portable WAAS gps with an app called CloudAhoy... really cool data collector... needs to be a WAAS source, so the iPad or iPhone gps data might not work...

Work with the best data available, then add the safety guidelines of judgement, like Hank pointed out above...

PP thoughts only, not a CFI...

Best regards,

-a-

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2 hours ago, Southernpilot said:

6,349’ and 7,095.

That's getting up there.

Go to Downloads on the homepage, there are lots of books there. A more recent one should have more information. 

Edited by Hank
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