Andy95W

Supporter
  • Content count

    2,768
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    11

Andy95W last won the day on November 6

Andy95W had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1,876 Excellent

1 Follower

About Andy95W

  • Rank
    Won't Leave!

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Michigan
  • Interests
    A&P, IA, ATP, CFI
  • Reg #
    N--95W
  • Model
    M20C

Recent Profile Visitors

2,846 profile views
  1. Yoke upgrade

    No 337 required because they are all factory parts for the upgraded yokes. They are also available with upgraded yoke shafts to end a 500 hour recurring AD on yoke shaft cracking. Since they are factory parts, it's just a logbook entry. Arranging the switches is a minor alteration to what you already have, so also just a logbook entry. $$$ but easy paperwork.
  2. passenger seatbelt of doom

    This is a good technique that allows for an easy and predictable transition to the airport environment. In effect, it turns the airplane into something we all got familiar with early in our careers, basically a 172, in the traffic pattern. The industry standard is to keep the airplane as clean as possible for as long as possible for reasons of efficiency. Not a big deal in our M20Cs, but a very big deal as you step up in size to turboprops and jets. For those airplanes you slow down as you approach the airport and dirty up the airplane when you need to continue the descent, i.e., in the traffic pattern. I am not advocating that everyone should do this- people should do what they were trained and are comfortable with- but just explaining why a lot of folks drop gear on downwind.
  3. +1 An executive whose only job is to ensure his employees and customers both get screwed!
  4. o-360 overhaul

    It's worth it. As for the back seat and adults: @Bob_Belville will post a picture of his short-body with real, adult humans in the backseat. It's good for 1/2 hour, and okay for 1 hour. With only one adult in the back seat, sitting kind of sideways, it's perhaps the most comfortable seat in the airplane for any length of flight you'd contemplate. As for re-sale? You're not going to MAKE money off the airplane, but you will definitely find a buyer for it if it's in decent shape. And it sounds like it is.
  5. Cost of ownership "budget"

    Your statements are nearly identical to my own 20 years ago. Boy, was I wrong! If the job really were all that bad, nobody would want to do it. And we don't fly between the same airports 5 times a day. For one thing, that would be unsafe because it would breed complacency. And like Jim said, TSA isn't so bad. What was bad was immediately following 9/11 when every airport had its own security that all had different standards. The life of a corporate pilot isn't that great, by the way. On call 6 days with one day off, and you get called to work on the 7th day. No thanks. Or how about making a 1 hour flight at 7am, then have to sit and wait in an FBO for 8 hours because the boss says, "Make sure you're ready to go at 4 o'clock!" But then he doesn't show up until 6:30 and doesn't have the decency to call and say he's running late. No thanks. Or having to help load bags, or deal with catering the airplane because the boss refuses to leave without his Perrier bottled water and gets pissed off at you if it isn't right. No thanks. Or being threatened with getting fired because you don't want to fly an unsafe airplane, or go below minimums on an approach. No thanks. The life of the fractional guys isn't too bad, until they have to fly on an airline to meet there airplane. And they don't have priority going through the line or, like Jim said, Known Crewmember access. And they don't get flight benefits. It is true that you have to "pay your dues" at a regional airline. But here's the secret: It's still a hell of a lot of fun doing that! Doing what you enjoy doing with a bunch of pretty decent people, most of whom you actually enjoy hanging out with is worth low pay initially- but even that pay has come up ALOT with the pilot shortage as it is. PM me if you want some info about what my life is like on a week to week basis. Flying started out as a hobby for me and now it's my full-time job. How lucky is that?
  6. Cost of ownership "budget"

    I think this is an excellent reason to take a loan because it’s like a student loan- and owning your Mooney is adding things to your aviation education that you wouldn’t be able to find anywhere else. Good for you and good luck
  7. Cost of ownership "budget"

    I agree with Jim. I would never fault someone for taking out a loan on an airplane, but if you can't swing it without the loan, it might be too much airplane for you. The one exception I see is for an airplane that you actually NEED for business and can write off the commensurate expenses accordingly. If you don't need it for your work, it's a toy- and a toy that is one corrosion inspection or metal-found-in-the-oil filter from ruining you if you took out too much of a loan.
  8. Speaking of vacuum steps-

    Because Al Mooney didn't design it that way, that's why. Same reason I like my Johnson Bar landing gear. You dang kids with yer new-fangled flyin' machines. No respect for the classics.
  9. Cost of ownership "budget"

    That's only mortgage interest, and that's probably not for long...
  10. Replace aileron final link bearing

    I had the same thing a few years back, there isn't a replacement option other than factory new, after which you'll need new Heim bearings. If there turns out to be a cheaper route, please post it. The cool thing to me is that my 53 year old M20C now has the same aileron links as a brand new Acclaim.
  11. AD Search

    I might be changing how I do things thanks to Alex and the FAA site. It's a lot better than it used to be. The only real PITA is the accessories section.
  12. AD Search

    That looks really good. I may change how I do mine- no reason to be stuck too far in the past!
  13. AD Search

    I need to rethink my current provider! Thanks for the info.
  14. AD Search

    Like Rich said, it'll cost money to make it easy, average seems to be around $500/year and up. Not really suitable for an individual owner. I'm paying $399/year because I've been a subscriber for a long time, and that's about the cheapest I've seen. For me, it's a requirement to keep my IA current (so at least it's tax deductible- for now.) The good news is that the actual data is free from the FAA, and old ADs rarely change. Therfore, an old AD compliance report really only needs a search for any new ADs released in the past 1 year period. The difficulty is that the FAAs website doesn't make it easy to do this for your engine, prop, airframe, and all of your accessories. If you find an easy way to do so, please post it.
  15. Cost of ownership "budget"

    #1: Determine your disposable income #2: Your operating expenses = all of it Although written as a joke, there is some truth to this. We have one owner/member here who is flying an M20C for very little due to low acquisition cost and a lot of his own personal sweat equity. We have other owners who have similar airplanes and who have dropped $30k on avionics upgrades. To a certain degree, your budget will determine your course of action, and your wishlist will be just a bit more than your spouse will let you spend.