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Showing most liked content since 12/21/2016 in Image Reviews

  1. I'm late to the discussion, as I've been working. But I thought maybe I could throw in my 2 cents. Just as a point of reference, I just went over 20,000 total time, I'm type rated in the 727, L1011, 737, 757, 767, DC9/MD88, and the A319/320/321. Over 2000 hours in the F-15, 1200 in the T-37, and a master instructor in the USAF. USAF Flight Examiner, Designated FAA Examiner and Line Check Airman. I was an accident investigator for over 20 years, both military and civilian, and participated in over 2 dozen major mishaps with many fatalities. The things I know for a fact: I could have done what the OP did. NO ONE expects bad stuff to happen, and when it does, it catches you by surprise, as we all think we've planned and thought ahead. The ONE thing we've missed is the thing that happens. It takes a HUGE amount of guts to admit a mistake. I've learned more than I already knew by reading this thread. I truly respect the OP for coming on here and teaching me something. No matter how smart I am, I guarantee there is much I don't know, and more that I have to learn. Hopefully any time someone makes a mistake, they'll come on here and help me to avoid the same mistake. @carusoam Your post was extremely helpful to me, thanks for that. @kelty Good luck to you in the future, and thanks for sharing your experience. The Navy used to publish a series called "Grandpa Pettibone" wherein aviators shared their mistakes and mishaps. I think I learned as much from that as any other source. Your willingness to come on here, and do just that honors the service.
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  2. To all of my friends here on Mooneyspace, I'd like to offer my sincere appologies for my part in the turn of the "Fatalities" thread started by Amillet. We should be taking lessons from this tragedy, which is how it started out. Instead it has turned into a pissing contest about who can read the regs better for which I'm truly embarrassed. I've asked the moderators to delete the thread in its entrirety, I hope they will. Regards, Clarence
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  3. Sorry for the retread from last year, but I didn't have time to photoshop another Mooney in flight over a winter scene. The feelings are unchanged.
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  4. I went out to the hanger earlier this week to finally empty out the mini fridge for winter. Everything was froze solid except a few bottles of water. It was fun playing with, but makes me wonder why I live in Minnesota. -Dan
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  5. So N10933 is coming along in her pheonix rising. I told in another thread a few weeks ago I had sent it for a tank reseal prior to painting last year, and a wing spar cap corrosion was found - and that was very depressing - and expensive to fix. But thanks to Dave at AirMods in NJ, that is all fixed and behind me. Thanks Dave! So then it went back to Weepnomore in Wilmar, MN, to do that reseal, and also I got LR tanks. By this time I figured I was in it for a long haul and it really is a super nice airplane, so eh, time to really make it new again. ....and I always wanted Bruce Jaeger's system - and he is right there also at Wilmar. So....thank you Bruce - he installed the Interiors STC interior mod that he does, and it looks fantastic - and it is true as he said, not only is it clean, and clean lines, but it really does give a bit more room. Most obvious is the extra elbow room which is most welcome for a big guy like me. Plus Bruce sublets leather upholstery to SCS interiors in Duluth, a company that does all sorts of things, including the oem for custom interiors for cirrus. Anyway I worked with them and you can see the result. I picked colors called "umber" and I asked custom for perforated leather, and also for the base cushion to be 2.5'' longer than original which is much more comfortable for my long legs. and new rugs. And bruce set me up with lots and lots of leather pockets! 7 in all! I love it! Pictures attached. Plus a picture of the pick up day on Fri (-5F on the field! in MN) (and wow the rocket has quite decent heating but... it was cold at -30 at FL19 on the way home on Sat!). Then she goes to the paint shop next month. More pictures will follow. Let me say everybody in this group of people was fantastic. Thank you all! Paul, Eric, David, Bruce!
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  6. I did switch tanks, just probably 10-15 seconds later than needed to happen. I never tried the boost pump and. I tried 3 restarts and all were unsuccessful . If one of you guys doesn't make the same mistake I did, then all the ridicule is worth it. That's the whole rationale behind safety reporting.
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  7. I think it's a bit harsh to throw Kelty on the alter. I commend him for coming forward and telling his story for the rest of us to learn from. We've already seen calibrated sight gauges, checks of the low fuel warning, we know about calibrated dip sticks (among other varieties). We all should take something away from this other than a piece of him. I'm glad he survived, shared his story and will fly again. Clarence
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  8. Nothing! Santa said I posted too many fat women pictures and I'm being punished.
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  9. We enjoyed some wonderful flying on Christmas day. It's one of my favorite days to fly because there are so few planes in the sky and you have the air all to yourself. Anyone else go flying on xmas?
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  10. For any flight at night it is advisable the pilot be IFR rated. In many countries night flying is considered IFR, the pilot and plane must be IFR rated. I totally agree with this policy. José
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  11. Dear Santa, I've been a very good boy this year. I read each of Carusoam's summaries thoroughly even though he's only a PP and not a CFI, A&P, IA, or CPA. I completed all the SBs just like M20Doc told me too and I didn't let any of Marauder's girlfriends inside my plane. I did just like Hank asked and posted my "Time to Climb" numbers, and think David Clarks still look cool (just like Bob). I do all my annuals just like Cliffy, and unlike Jetdriven I spend more time at home than working on the plane. So... All I want for Christmas is a new Acclaim Ultra, and maybe a DMax gift card to go along with it. Sincerely (with milk and cookies), Cnoe Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  12. Since most of their employees have been there for years I'm sure they are compensated fairly or they would have left. There's a huge difference in thinking to work for someone else or to own a business. Many people want to punch a clock, collect a paycheck and not have the responsibility. The fact that they would offer the opportunity to the employees first before selling it to someone else says a lot.
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  13. I'm looking at this thread and it really strikes me that pilots are a pretty tough crowd, and the internet emboldens some folks to say things they wouldn't say to someone face to face in a million years.
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  14. Justifying the plane to your wife... That's funny right there! [emoji3][emoji3]. Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
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  15. I got this: 1979 M20K, with a -LB, Airflow intercooler, Merlyn, Aspen, TKS and several other toys (I'm pretty giddy!). It will be based at KEDC. Should suit my usual mission of Angel Flights and statewide search of the best BBQ in Texas. I'm new to the board, but I've been flying about 5 years and 400 hours. IR to get the most from this bird, and planning to knock out my commercial in the next few months. David
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  16. Apologies if someone else has already posted this: T'was the night before Christmas, and out on the ramp, Not an airplane was stirring, not even a Champ. The aircraft were fastened to tie downs with care, In hopes that -- come morning -- they all would be there. The fuel trucks were nestled, all snug in their spots, With gusts from two-forty at 39 knots. I slumped at the fuel desk, now finally caught up, And settled down comfortably, resting my butt. When the radio lit up with noise and with chatter, I turned up the scanner to see what was the matter. A voice clearly heard over static and snow, Called for clearance to land at the airport below. He barked his transmission so lively and quick, I'd have sworn that the call sign he used was "St. Nick." I ran to the panel to turn up the lights, The better to welcome this magical flight. He called his position, no room for denial, "St. Nicholas One, turnin' left onto final." And what to my wondering eyes should appear, But a Rutan-built sleigh, with eight Rotax Reindeer! With vectors to final, down the glideslope he came, As he passed all fixes, he called them by name: "Now Ringo! Now Tolga! Now Trini and Bacun! On Comet! On Cupid!" What pills was he takin'? While controllers were sittin', and scratchin' their heads, They phoned to my office, and I heard it with dread, The message they left was both urgent and dour: "When Santa pulls in, have him please call the tower." He landed like silk, with the sled runners sparking, Then I heard, "Left at Charlie," and "Taxi to parking." He slowed to a taxi, turned off of three-oh, And stopped on the ramp with a "Ho, ho-ho-ho..." He stepped out of the sleigh, but before he could talk, I ran out to meet him with my best set of chocks. His red helmet and goggles were covered with frost, And his beard was all blackened from Reindeer exhaust. His breath smelled like peppermint, gone slightly stale, And he puffed on a pipe, but he didn't inhale. His cheeks were all rosy and jiggled like jelly, His boots were as black as a cropduster's belly. He was chubby and plump, in his suit of bright red, And he asked me to "fill it, with hundred low-lead." He came dashing in from the snow-covered pump, I knew he was anxious for drainin' the sump. I spoke not a word, but went straight to my work, And I filled up the sleigh, but I spilled like a jerk. He came out of the restroom, and sighed in relief, Then he picked up a phone for a Flight Service brief. And I thought as he silently scribed in his log, These reindeer could land in an eighth-mile fog. He completed his pre-flight, from the front to the rear, Then he put on his headset, and I heard him yell, "Clear!" And laying a finger on his push-to-talk, He called up the tower for clearance and squawk. "Take taxiway Charlie, the southbound direction, Turn right three-two-zero at pilot's discretion". He sped down the runway, the best of the best, "Your traffic's a Grumman, inbound from the west." Then I heard him proclaim, as he climbed through the night, "Merry Christmas to all! I have the traffic in sight."
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  17. My wife got me a new ornament for the tree this year.
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  18. I don't get that ad. If you make it your profile pic though I'll read anything you post.
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  19. I have posted in the past about the awkward feeling of flying with and holding criticism of other airmen. I'm not big on criticizing pilots but there are often things to be learned so I think about it or post here. But, this one takes things to a whole other level. I'm currently on a trip to South Africa, Botswana, and Namibia. Traveling with my wife and dad. We came to Botswana by airline and had to transfer to a small charter flight to reach the wildlife lodge. Coming out of the arrival area, we were greeted by a young black African holding a sign with our names. When he said that he was the pilot, I had a "you're the pilot!?" response. I know how it feels to be on the other end of that but I think the surprise was sooner from the fact that he was awaiting for us and helping with luggage than anything else. We boarded a GA8, basically a flying barn that resembles a Skyhawk but with 7 seats and an aisle. Accompanying the pilot was a white woman and the pilot said "you are lucky, today you have two pilots." It seemed excessive. We weren't even airborne and I already realized it was either a checkout or a learning flight. The ground roll was quite long and a bit disconcerting was the stall horn frequently chirping after rotation. Soon we were climbing and just 10 minutes later we arrived at the airstrip near our lodge. Just a 10 minute flight, but over 7 hours to reach by land. On landing, the stall horn was chirping still well above the ground and the woman pilot grabbed the controls briefly. It was clear that the combined time of both in front was not more than 500. Not thrilled to have someone's education taking place on my bacon but everything was acceptable. After a night at Baines Safari Lodge in the Okavango Delta, we boarded for another flight but to a different airport further north to continue our trip. This time the pilot was older, white, and unfriendly. My dad impolitely and straight forward asked him how many hours he has. I think it was because I was just joking the previous day that the collected experience up front was so little. But I didn't expect anyone to say something like that. Anyway, he said about 2700. I asked about the airport elevation? He eagerly answered 3000ft. Density altitude? He ignored my question and turned to loading luggage. His expression was like, "who knows? Who cares?" By my guesstimate, 5000ft. The dirt strip I'd say was 4000x100. My dad went over and told him that I'm a pilot and insisted he let me sit up front. He asked what I fly and I said a Mooney. He didn't talk to me any further. The pilot shut the door on his side and I asked if we're not going to keep them open while we taxi to the other side facing the ~8kt headwind. He responded, "we're just going off the other end." I was quite perplexed but didn't feel it was my place to question as I am unfamiliar with the aircraft or field. But I certainly saw no good reason not to takeoff into the wind. Well my shock and horror, it was everything I expected it to be. An endless ground roll, low speed, trees coming up at the end like a charging train! He lifts off not less than 3/4 of the way down the runway. I saw a low spot between the trees 20 degrees to the right, a shallow turn could easily get us there. He continued to climb straight ahead. Not only did he barely clear the trees, the climb was very shallow as you'd expect from a loaded plane at high density altitude. I've had my own share of takeoff screw ups but nothing has come close to this! If it wasn't bad enough, he began a crosswind turn with barely any altitude and a shallow climb. I will admit the stall horn never chirped but that left me wondering if it was even functional. Back on the ground before the takeoff, I was dismayed that he forgot to set the DG, did not do a mag check, and did not use a checklist. Hardly surprising because in the air I realized he had also forgotten to turn on any lights, turn on the transponder, or set the altimeter. It wasn't till halfway through the flight that he finally set the DG but I knew it all along. Enroute, he was sloppy on airspeed and course. The altitude fluctuated up to 250ft and was rarely on target. It wasn't partially turbulent but neither calm. Same story with the course. He came very close to a bird strike with a soaring vulture. He made no evasive maneuver because I'm pretty sure he did not even notice. Birds can be unpredictable so it's never a good idea to rely on them staying put as you pass them. The fuel totalizer was blinking zero fuel, indicating that it was not reset or calibrated. Not a big issue but a senseless waste of safety information. It was equally representative of his careless attitude as backtaxiing the landed dirt runway with his hands in his lap and the yoke bouncing around. I also realized that although he gave a briefing about exits and emergency gear, he never briefed the passengers about safety belts nor did he take a look to see that passengers were belted prior to landing. Another indication of not following checklists (the s in gumps is safety belts). The lack of checklist use was less daunting than the fact that many things were not completed that a checklist would have corrected. The all around complacent attitude is a terrible problem. The lack of interest in performance calculations, density altitude, wind, and safety are a disaster just dying to happen. This was the shittiest pilot I have ever had the displeasure of flying with without question. My hands were shaking when we disembarked like no flight I have had in a long time. My wife was terrified; my dad was oblivious. He did not fly to commercial standards. He did not even come close to flying to private pilot standards. While many of his careless oversights were peripheral, they were a clear demonstration of a complacent attitude. But he committed multiple violations of FARs (I know this is a different country but based on ICAO and past flying experience, I would guess things are very similar) and should not hold a certificate. He would not pass a checkride. In fact he would fail a private checkride multiple times around with this sort of negligence. Although I am a little regretful of not saying or doing anything, I don't think there is a thing I could have done to help someone with this sort of attitude. I only pity future passengers. Reporting him would not be easy as we flew straight to a remote strip without contact with his company. I have noticed slight mistakes from other pilots in the past and I've flown with others that I can look up to. But after flying with this guy, I am uncomfortable with the idea of him holding commercial or even private privileges. Passengers would not be aware of the sort of risk he put them in. The lack of a mag check or checklist before takeoff, wrong takeoff, and minimal margin from the trees meant that we were literally one more little mistake or problem away from death. Had one mag been already inop prior to the flight, had he forgotten to extend flaps, had he maintained angle of attack slightly less efficiently, had he tried to dodge a bird in the takeoff path, had the tailwind picked up just slightly, had we encountered sinking air, etc, etc, there was no further margin! Taking off the other way would have been plenty. I'm posting this story to get things off my chest and to perhaps serve as a learning example of how not to fly for others. I'm counting on Anthony to provide a cliff notes version for those who don't want to read the full story.
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  20. Everyone is capable of a mistake, it's just that sometimes the mistakes are more noticeable & painful than others. The first several dozen entries gave much praise for a job well done and bringing praise to the fact he didn't stall/spin into the ground or he "missed" the tree trunk, and that is all fine & good, but the fact remains he ran out of fuel. I am certain the OP has in fact "learnt well and truly from his error of judgment", but this thread isn't for him or about him anymore...it's for the benefit of the rest of us...as well as the OP's future flying. I'm certain the OP did not initiate this thread so as to simply expose his chest to our barbs of criticism...I don't know him, but I like to think he did it for the benefit of our group's learning and, for that, I commend him greatly.
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  21. For a different perspective, I thought I would slip this one in sideways-
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  22. To not post fat women pictures. That resolution will last as long as the "drink less", "exercise more" resolutions. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  23. The ability to pull up to your hangar, unload the car into the airplane, park the car inside is priceless, plus you can keep all your usual gear there as well (skis, fishing poles, hiking gear, doubles as an extra storage space when you're doing construction at home and need a covered materials staging area. It's well worth is. Plus sometime it's just nice to leave the wife at home, grab a beer or two on your way out, unfold a chair and just sit there and stare at your airplane, especially when it's stormy. My hangar looks towards miles of cornfield, some amazing storms I've seen from inside. Once I even finished the whole 6 pack and just slept there with the door open;-) Woke up with a mouse on my face.
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  24. Today we had a local school come on a field trip to the airport. Myself and a few others showed the kids the airplanes and the basics. We even had LifeFlight stop in to show the helicopter, a local RC pilot did a little airshow, and a powered paraglider did a few passes at 10mph. What a great day, I think my smile was bigger than theirs
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  26. Clarence, I'll echo Anthony's ( and the others') comments. Humility can be in short supply on this board, and you starting this post shows that you have it and aren't above recognizing what went well and what didn't go so well. You have made many valuable contributions to the discussions here and have served the Mooney community faithfully. We'll remember those contributions long after we have forgotten about one thread having gone sideways. Best, Robert
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  27. Again you have no clue what you are speaking of , he most certainly could do a flooded start procedure , maybe 15 seconds , but he didn't have enough time.....Kelty thanks for being humble enough to share this with us , I know at least a few of the people reading this will learn from your mistake ...... Also thanks for not making up excuses , Being at the top of the game... It shows us that even the best of the best are human......... The "culture" of GA pilots is pretty sad in some cases........ Every time I get into a plane , I take the attitude that I am not a good pilot , what can I do so I don't screw it up........ It has served me well......
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  28. I love this place. It's like a newtons law. For every opinion there is an equal and opposite opinion.
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  29. I disagree Jose. There's VFR flying on a moonless night between cloud layers and then there's flying around NYC lit up bright as day by a full moon. You can see the horizon, ground, and airport at all times, nothing to do with instruments. It's up to the pilot to have the prudence to understand the difference and his limitations.
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  30. Unfortunately, wives know about Mooneyspace... when they think you're texting another woman and then discover it's Mooneyspace, you almost wish it was another woman instead.
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  31. Santa said I wasn't too bad of a boy. He said he enjoyed one of those pictures. Said it reminded him of Mrs. Claus.
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  32. My shop is starting to fill up with Mooney cowling mod parts. Two shiny things arrived today for the G and then F model that I'll be modding soon.
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  33. Finished up my dual time and got to fly solo in the Mooney yesterday. http://intothesky.us/2017/01/14/last-cfi-flight-first-solo-in-the-mooney/ Then today I got to go flying again this morning, this time in the right seat of @MHemperly's "E" as the safety pilot while he was shooting approaches for his IFR currency. I was glad he asked, I had a great time and learned a lot. Here's a few pictures from this morning.
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  34. Flew to Camarillo for breakfast this morning from KAJO with my beautiful family. Met up with a couple other friends that flew out of the high desert KWJF. It was a bit bumpy but all in all a great flight. And Waypoint cafe is always a treat!
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  35. Took this picture yesterday flying home after Christmas in Asheville, NC. Flew from KAVL to KLYH and then KLYH to KOQN, pic was taken shortly after departing Lynchburg level at 7,000 ft. 22"MP and 2500 RPM. We maintained over 200kts for a good portion of the second leg.
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  36. My dad has said he might quit flying when he can no longer get his T-210 in/out of the hangar. He pushes it himself, but he is a young guy, only 85.
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  37. Just added another notch in my plane ownership belt. I'm on my 26th year of owning the same Mooney. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  38. The day after Christmas I had the good fortune to go up in FlyDave's Bravo on an absolutely perfect Bay Area day. We did a short Bay Tour from Petaluma and for the first time I got to play photographer instead of pilot. So now I finally have some great aerial photos of SF and the surrounding area. Here's Dave's Bravo on the ramp before departure. Lots of rain lately, so everything is green and lush. The Petaluma River snaking its way towards the San Francisco Bay. You can see San Francisco in the distance. San Quentin Prison, home of California's (nominal) death row. View showing San Quentin's proximity to San Francisco and a lot of very pricey real estate. Beautiful Marin County. Hillside homes in Sausalito. My house is circled in red. Next we headed towards the Golden Gate and the Pacific beyond. The Marin Headlands, looking northwest. Turned around to get some shots of the City. Here we are approaching it from the northwest. Ocean Beach, Golden Gate Park and the western neighborhoods are in view. Approaching San Francisco. Even closer. You can see Salesforce Tower under construction, the first building in SF that will be taller than the Pyramid. Another prison: Alcatraz. It's shrouded in white tarps while extensive renovations proceed beneath. The new section of the Oakland Bay Bridge, with downtown Oakland as a backdrop. UC Berkeley in the foreground with Mount Diablo in the distance. Heading back to the airport over pastoral Sonoma County. Short final, runway 11 at O69. Dave, thanks for the amazing flight! It was a perfect way to close out another year of flying Mooneys.
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  39. He did not switch tanks when he normally would, but read the second to last sentence! Not saying he didn't make any mistakes, but he clearly prioritized flying the airplane to avoid hitting power lines first. I give him credit for even having the balls to post this on here.
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  40. I just had my girls up Christmas day
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  41. We have 3 Mooney's based at my home airport (KIMT). I had mine moved over to the Airlifeline hangar when my test pilot for my Lancair came up, as he wanted his plane in the same hangar as my Lancair (easy access to tools , etc.). Since I am heading out to Florida tomorrow I needed my Mooney fueled and back in MY hangar. When I went in the large hangar to move it out, I spotted a Mooney Hat Trick, all 3 locally based Mooney's were side by side in the hangar.
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  42. This morning I picked up a friend in Lake City: and then went south to Ocala for breakfast at Tailwinds Cafe. This Paine's Prarie section of I-75 just south of Gainesville: My GoPro Session 4 was mounted on the vertical stabilizer so I got some good shots. Leaving home at 7:30am: Landing runway 36 at KOCF: And then we went west to Cedar Key just to say I've landed my plane there. This shot shows the abandoned Great Florida Canal project that was halted in the 60s. Designed as a shortcut for small and medium ships getting to the Gulf. Then the misssus and I *finally* made it to Flagler. Perfect night conditions. I went up to 9500 feet, went east to CRG VOR then south to KFIN. I was doing 142kts GS the entire way. Transponder is working great, got flight following there and back. 2.9 hrs day, 2.2 hrs night, 7 landings total. Most were greasers but OCF I hit a little hard. I'm starting to get used to the landing picture and energy management now.
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  43. Feliz Navidad Y Prospero Ano Nuevo
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  44. DM, I made a tow from a used Hoveround electric wheel chair 6 years ago. I found the chair on Craigslist and gave $160 for it. I built a hitch (tongue) for it and installed a 2 1/2" ball on the foot rest of the chair. I attach the hitch to the plane with a round metal rod that extends completely through the nose wheel attach point. I'll post a picture or two. Sorry for the poor quality. By the way, the chair has plenty of power to tow the Mooney with me sitting on the chair. I can tow the plane nearly as fast as a person can walk if necessary. There is a slight learning curve to operate it. I'll have to admit, I get some very funny looks from people who see me moving my plane with a wheel chair! I also used to have a Challenger II Experimental. In order for me to hangar it in the same "T" hangar with the Mooney, I built a lift for it using a walk-behind forklift. I got the forklift on eBay for $480. I built a fork extension for the plane to sit on. I raised the Challenger about 6' and the Mooney fit under it without any problems. I used it for 3 years or so until I sold it along with the Challenger.
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  45. With that smirk on your face, you're starting to look like the rest of us dirty old men.
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  46. I'm off to a good year. With the headwind trip back from Florida and flight testing the Lancair, I already have almost 20 hours in this year (will be over that before today is done). I will fly 2 hours this AM to finish off my 40 hour test time in the Lancair, and will take my building partner and best friend for his first flight in the plane he must have close to 1,000 hours helping build (no passengers allowed during Phase One Testing). Here is the only picture I managed to take yesterday. I had the power pulled back to a measly 27.5 gallons an hour going into the wind, seeing 135 knots GS, and pushed it up to cruise power going down wind (winds howling pretty good out of the west yesterday). I just couldn't resist seeing what she would do with a tailwind. I heard center calling me out as VFR traffic (verified by my ADS-B too). I have to wonder what he thought seeing me at 133 knots west bound and almost 400 knots east bound? Tom
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  47. My Mooney Musings I've flown and taught in almost all the Mooney models extensively (over 8,600 hours of my 10,600 hour total). Once you've extensively flown the speed of the turbos you just don't want any less. I know all about LOP and just prefer to fly fast ROP. I don't particularly care about fuel flow, but I do care about fuel prices, so will plan my flights for minimum cost of fuel. I prefer to fly the mid teens for smoothness of the flight. I don't like masks, but don't mind the conserving nasal canulas at all. Under 10K, especially in Arizona and Wyoming leads to a bumpy ride in the summertime due to thermal turbulence. I prefer glass, just not the limitations Mooney has placed on the G1000, so I don't think I would ever buy a G1000 airplane. The Acclaim's extra speed isn't worth the extra money paid for the airplane, although if someone wants to buy one, I'll teach them how to fly it properly. If you fly an airplane the way it should be flown with grace and smoothness, you won't notice the difference in flight in control responsiveness between all models of Mooneys. The long bodies are heavier and give a smoother ride in turbulence. It does take some time to master their landings after flying the short body Mooneys. The turbo long bodies are more expensive to own so expect to always be fixing something on them, In fact expect to always be fixing something on ANY airplane you buy. Fuel burn on the long bodies are much greater than the short bodies. If you care about fuel burns, don't buy a long body. There is much more space in the long bodies, and useful loads can be increased if you remove the back seats. I usually fly with no back seats and have weight and balances for both configurations. There hasn't been one Mooney from the A Model to the TN that I have flown or taught in that I would rather have than my own. There is also no other single engine piston airplane that I would own other than a Mooney. Mooney Instructor and Bravo Owner for 24 years and counting.
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  48. This morning canceled our plans for breakfast at Keystone. Woke up at 7am, solid layer of clouds at 2,000 feet and moving rapidly. I went back to sleep. I woke up at 2pm (I work nightshift) and broken at 6,000- winds still kicking. I went out and pounded the pattern to get more x-wind practice. Winds 350@14G21. Took off runway 25 and maxed out at 1,500fpm with myself and full tanks. I was 500 feet above pattern altitude by the time I turned crosswind. Winds changed to 360@9G11, went over to Cannon Creek and hit Runway (sidewalk) 36 a couple times. First one I dropped it from 3 feet, it hurt. Stall warning never went off. Next two were go arounds, the wind would just balloon me when I flare and start climbing again, and the airspeed was bleeding quick. Winds still the same, went and hit Runway 28 at Lake City and practiced drift control with a good crosswind. Tower was closed so I didn't feel so bad about missing the centerline. All in all, 1.2 and 6 landings helped out a bit. Tomorrow morning, pre-heating the plane and heading over to St. Augustine for breakfast with a Cherokee pilot. Then turning around and heading to Cedar Key with more Cherokee pilots for lunch. I'll have a tailwind going east, and headwind going west. 44 hrs so far, getting close to having to change the oil.
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  49. No worries Clarence. It's all good. I blame that thread going sideways on extended LOP operations by some folks here. Just my opinion, not an expert, just PPL, no AP, and I occasionally do not use flaps either, no glass panel, round gauges rule, iPad user, paper is for old people, centrist republican, and if I have not offended someone yet I'll buy you a beer at SnF or Oshkosh [emoji3] Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  50. From this side of the Pond, Happy Christmas, Hunnakah, Dewali etc. Andrew and I wish you the best of the season, glad tidings, great joy and happiness. Have a lovey time and we wish you a very prospoerous New Year. Lots of Love Us Two.
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