exM20K

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About exM20K

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    LL10
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    M20TN

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  1. probably thinking of the Mooney Summit. Made the middle third of last years Mooney Max event and found it worthwhile. Looking forward to this year's event if able to clear the calendar. -dan
  2. No question... the long body planes are bloated pigs flying on the same wing as a 200HP E. The power to weight ration slightly favors the heavy planes, but it's asking a lot of that wing. -dan
  3. Excess energy and excess airspeed are not necessarily the same thing. I had some videos of drop tests on diamond aircraft, but I can't find them. Pitty. these things bounce! The video below is somewhat similar - note that the plane, with the wings providing no lift at all, does bounce. Now imagine a wing providing some lift. Boing!
  4. Ross, I don't want to quibble over the aerodynamics - but the cause and cure of a bounce from too high a flare are different from those associated with forcing a too-fast airplane to land before it's ready. Too high a flare drops the nose to gain airspeed above landing speed to produce a bounce? Springy gear launches the plane back into the air? maybe a combination of the two? Whatever it is, mastering the sight picture for the flare, continuously raising the nose, and managing airspeed all play an important role in good landings. -dan
  5. I agree with this comment: the plane will bounce if you drop it in from too high a flare, and in fact, this is a bad place to be: Airborn with insufficient speed to fly. BTDT.... more than once. youre sitting very low in the mooney as compared with other types. Get a good look at the sight picture, stay outside the airplane, practice landing with the seat cranked up and down. You should be able to feel the plane enter the ground effect: it almost accelerates a little. My technique is to continuously roll in nose up trim while rolling out the throttle. Finally, remember to follow through with the yoke: just like shooting trap, finish with the yoke in your labp, and you will find your landings improved immensely. finally: Go up to altitude and experiment with actual stalling speed in landing configuration at a few weights. I have recorded where the stall warning goes off and where the buffet begins. In my case, with TKS, it’s actually right at the book values. For a short field, you really shouldn’t be more than 1.2 x Vso when crossing the threshold. That’s still giving you a lot of airspeed buffer before the stall. Mastering this plane and getting a series of greasers will be very satisfying. -dan
  6. I agree with this comment: the plane will bounce if you drop it in from too high a flare, and in fact, this is a bad place to be: Airborn with insufficient speed to fly. BTDT.... more than once. youre sitting very low in the mooney as compared with other types. Get a good look at the sight picture, stay outside the airplane, practice landing with the seat cranked up and down. You should be able to feel the plane enter the ground effect: it almost accelerates a little. My technique is to continuously roll in nose up trim while rolling out the throttle. Finally, remember to follow through with the yoke: just like shooting trap, finish with the yoke in your labp, and you will find your landings improved immensely. finally: Go up to altitude and experiment with actual stalling speed in landing configuration at a few weights. I have recorded where the stall warning goes off and where the buffet begins. In my case, with TKS, it’s actually right at the book values. For a short field, you really shouldn’t be more than 1.2 x Vso when crossing the threshold. That’s still giving you a lot of airspeed buffer before the stall. -dan
  7. Thanks. What does the difference look like for your typical weight? -dan
  8. Does your Ovation POH have grass runway performance charts? My 2009 Acclaim POH has blank pages "Pending Data." I don't interpret this as a limitation, though. -de
  9. Over on bee talk, a local pilot posted the location of the crash relative to the runway. It’s about 2/3 of the way down 04, and offset to the left from the field. I’ll post the image at the end of this post, and of course, it will be inverted because iPad. To me, the location suggests some LOC situation like a seat sliding back, rather than a direct WX cause, but what do I know? i don’t think the flying lawn mower derisive, posthumous criticism of the pilot is at all helpful. From all accounts, the pilot was a solid IFR pilot, the weather was bad, but not all that bad, and we simply don’t know what happened. I have flown frequently in worse, and my flying lawnmower was able to get into North County when Palm Beach International was sending all the twin jets to divert locations. https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N676JM/history/20190506/1630Z/KOPN/F45 The flightaware radar picture is from mid flight and doesn’t do justice to the complexity of the WX situation. Especially in the terminal environment, we FLIBS have a maneuverability and VFR flexibility the 121 operators do not. Im very sorry for the loss of a consequential life In this mishap. His medical practice posted this: Thursday, May 9, 2019 Dr. Thomas J. Stillwell The physicians and employees of Minnesota Urology were devastated to learn early this morning that our colleague and friend, Dr. Thomas J. Stillwell, was killed late yesterday afternoon when piloting his plane from Moose Lake, MN back to the Twin Cities. Dr. Stillwell had just completed a regularly scheduled day of patient care at the Mercy Hospital clinic, where he provided urologic services to the Moose Lake community two times per month. Dr. Stillwell’s practice was unique in that he focused mainly on providing care to patients in rural communities that otherwise did not have access to a urologic physician and surgeon. In addition to Moose Lake, Dr. Stillwell flew his plane to Mora and Onamia, MN, and Grantsburg, WI regularly for more than twenty years. “Tom was extremely dedicated to serving the rural communities of Minnesota and Western Wisconsin,” noted Dr. Jeffry Twidwell, a fellow urologist who worked closely with Dr. Stillwell at Minnesota Urology. “He was one of a kind. In today’s world, how many specialty physicians dedicate their professional careers to serving rural areas…and travel to them by piloting their own planes? He was an incredibly generous and caring individual.” Dr. Stillwell was a board-certified urologist who received his medical degree from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and completed his residency at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. Prior to beginning his career at Minnesota Urology, Dr. Stillwell served as a surgeon with the U.S. Marines Mobile Surgical Hospital in Kuwait during Desert Storm. He has been named a Top Doctor in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Magazine numerous years, including 2019. Dr. Stillwell was an outstanding physician, colleague and friend who will be deeply missed. All of us at Minnesota Urology extend our condolences to his family, who remain in our thoughts and prayers. Interesting to note that this was John Pallante’s old plane. I trained with him in the early 90’s and noted his absence from the MAPASF PPP instructor rosters. If he has retired from flying, it’s a real loss to Mooney training. -de Can’t get the image to upload.....
  10. Better yet, get an Ovation or Acclaim: camlocks only. No cowl flaps or landing light connections to worry about!
  11. Start with having a service center purge the panels. They should also check the proportioning valves, which could be clogged or disconnected. for a particular panel. Pray that will fix it, because replacement panels are brutally expensive. Does fluid leak out of the bottom of the wing, and do you have trouble getting the low pressure warning to extinguish? That *may* suggest a disconnected fitting. -de
  12. These guys are delivering Lithiom ion batteries which are approx half the weight of the Concords in my Acclaim. Trouble is: the two heavy batteries serve as ballast, so cutting their weight would mean putting in Charlie weights in the tail. Less weight because of the arm, of course, but no way to recover the full 30 ish pounds of weight. https://www.truebluepowerusa.com/aviation-products/advanced-lithium-ion-batteries/
  13. https://washwax.com/ its a bit spendy when I use it on the motor home, but the stuff works great, especially because my well water is very hard. No water wash works for me.
  14. +1 on the wash wax all, and their red formula works well on the belly with minimal agitation. A little 100LL on a microfiber rag will clean up the tks panels, but I’ve found them to be mostly self-cleaning. You do run the system at least monthly rear round, right? -de
  15. I’d really like to find something that takes off the chalky, yellow exhaust stains that come from running LOP. It’s been the same on both my Mooney’s over the years, and that stuff is really hard to get off. One of the youtube aircraft detailing guys has some secret sauce that he says works very well. Dunno what it is. -de