LANCECASPER

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LANCECASPER last won the day on September 1

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About LANCECASPER

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Fredericksburg TX
  • Model
    M20M

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  1. Yoopers Rocketman's Lancair

    It won't let us on without a username and password.
  2. Insurance

    I have a suggestion. Buy a nice Bravo, (which is within 10-15 knots of an Acclaim) for 175K-200K and build up some retractable time. The hull value will be less so you'll pay about half the insurance premiums and you will go through less cylinders on the Lycoming than the Continental engines. No starter adaptor to deal with on the Lycomings either. Your avionics options are wide open on pre-G1000 Bravos and aren't tied to the type certificate.
  3. M20M flaps operating intermittently

    I was told the same thing. You may not. What I needed was one of these (W67RCSX-3). One of mine showed a burned spot through the clear housing. I replaced both and haven't had a problem since. (There is one for Up and one for Down). Here are some of the relays available right now: (https://www.ebay.com/itm/MAGNECRAFT-P-W67RCSX-3-DPDT-24VDC-5A-SLDR-LGS-RELAY-NEW-1-/152310990373)
  4. Hello from Houston TX

    I will bear with you, but I definitely won’t bare with you.
  5. Strip & Seal Fuel Tanks

    Weep No More and Wet Wingologists have the years of establishing a good track record. The folks in Houston are good Mooney supporters but haven't established the track record yet. If it was me I'd be headed to Minnesota or Florida, in that order.
  6. A Century 41 had heading, nav, coupled approaches, altitude hold. A Century IIB had a wing leveler and a nav coupler plus a heading bug if I remember correctly. Sounds like you have a IIb. Not sure of the cost but over the years it has been possible to add an STEC PSS (Pitch Stabilization System) and get altitude hold on a one axis system. But as others have mentioned with the newer autopilots coming out they will probably be much better options.
  7. Leather Restoration

    I've always had great results with a bar (not the liquid) of Ivory soap and water with a sponge - be careful with a brush or anything abrasive since it can wear away the top coat. Then after letting it dry for a day I put on Connolly Hide Care - you can buy it on Ebay or at a Jaguar or RR dealer. Goop this stuff on and work it in with your hands and be generous with it let it soak in overnight and then take a brand new soft microfiber and rub off any excess. It's great in the summer to leave it out in the sun with the doors closed. (I had a hard time getting Hide care a few years ago and used Eucerin moisturizer and had similar results).
  8. Any ex Grumman Tiger drivers here?

    I owned a Grumman Tiger a couple of years from 1988 -1990. It was no Mooney but I enjoyed it. You had to get used to being on the brakes during taxi (caster on the nose wheel). It was easy to fly. Coming out of a 172 I liked the fact that it was 15 knots faster on the same fuel flow. (135 knots cruise). Ironically I lived in North Dakota at the time and used to order parts from Fletchair in Houston. Now Fletchair is on the same field as me at Silver Wings in Fredericksburg TX. I see Grummans, especially Tigers, coming and going every day. For what they were back then I think most very well equipped compared to the typical 172 - most had Nav 122's which was an all-in-one VOR head/ILS/tuner. Mine had a Century IIB autopilot, Loran, DME. I have fond memories of the Tiger. I flew it from ND to TX a couple times.
  9. Annunciatior panel not working

    According to the M20M parts manual the Breaker may say "ANN", of course it probably won't be in that exact position below.
  10. I agree. I ordered some Thermal Paste from Ebay over the weekend should be in tomorrow.
  11. Ok, the metal bracket on which the trickle charge resistor sits was not hard to take out - just two pop rivets to drill out. Now that the bracket is out any recommendations on: 1) how to get the old resistor off (drill baby drill?) UPDATE: 1/8 drill bit popped them right out and the hole is countersunk. and 2) what to use to re-attach the new resistor (countersunk screw from the bottom so it's flush?) Would something like this work (http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/hapages/solidalumrivets.php?clickkey=4653)? How do I do it? UPDATE: I ordered some 1/8" diameter, 1/4" length, soft (1100) aluminum countersunk rivets from Aircraft Spruce. UPDATE: It's off and waiting for countersunk rivets from Aircraft Spruce.
  12. 350HP Mooney

    Great to hear! I sat in on a seminar Darwin did in Kerrville at MAPA in 1997 and have always been fascinated about this engine. Where do you get it serviced? Any maintenance issues you've had come up? Glad to hear yours is an M model with the higher gross weight limit.
  13. 350HP Mooney

    Here are some miscellaneous ramblings . . . This airplane has been for sale at least half of your life. This idea was conceived by Darwin Conrad - Rocket Engineering (same people that did the Mooney Missile and Rocket and still do the Piper Malibu/Mirage Jetprop). This was at a time when Porsche engiones in L models needed a replacement and early in the TLS history (M Model) when people were burning up cylinders fast and Mooney & Lycoming hadn't come up with the Bravo conversion yet. The real problem with the TIO-540-AF1A engine in the TLS is how people were told to run it - up to 1750 degree TIT and - believe it or not - 500 degree redline on CHT. The baffle seals that the factory put on the engine easily folded back and the engine ran super hot. People were only getting a few hundred hours before top end overhauls. I can tell you from personal experience having the first TIO-540-AF1A that was converted to a TIO-540-AF1B (Bravo) in 1996 that the Bravo does run cooler, but if you have good engine baffles you can keep TIT between 1600-1625 and cylinder temperatures around 380 on either engine. I have a TLS right now that's never been converted to a Bravo and I have made sure that the baffle seals were replaced with GEE-BEE seals. The temperatures are OK without the conversion. When it comes time for a top end or a engine rebuild then I'll do the conversion. The liquid cooled idea is great - that's the Voyager engine that RAM uses on twin Cessna upgrades (http://www.ramaircraft.com/Aircraft-Engine-Upgrade-Packages/Performance/414A-Series-V-Performance/SM044C4-414A-Series-V-Performance.htm). The problem with it in a Mooney is I don't know who you would take it to that has any experience with it for a Mooney annual. Maybe Lasar, Ton Gun or Maxwell and possibly Dugosh - but I don't know for a fact that any of those shops will work on one. Someone told me a couple years ago that there's only one shop in the country that will accept one - not sure which of the four shops it was. Any even if they do, how proficient are they on them if they hardly ever see them? There might be 1 - 3 flying. It would be nice if Mooney would test that engine for a next generation Acclaim replacement - there are a lot of advantages. I just think in its' present state it's destined to be an orphan. But finally here's the real problem with that airplane that you cite that's for sale- it's an L model - the useful load on that airplane is going to not be good. They originally only held 60 gallons since it had the Porsche engine and J landing gear and brakes. With the 500 liquid engine you need at least the original M Model 89 gallons of fuel and preferably the Monroy Long Range Tanks. But if you filled them up with one person you would be over gross since this airplane did not have the beefed up landing gear and brakes that came out a little into the M model. I've also heard that due to the weight of this engine that it needs engine mounts every few years. If this airplane was a $60,000 airplane, maybe. But the engine is going to cost well over that at rebuild time.
  14. Sidewinder experience ?

    I live in Texas, so snow and ice is not a problem here. The maneuverability is great and the Sidewinder has plenty of power to do the job. Over the years I've had gas powered, electric (both corded and battery), nosedraggers, etc. and the Sidewinder is the best for me. (By the way I tried to save money once and buy a Minimax and it was absolute garbage.) http://mooneyspace.com/topic/14330-wtb-tug/#comment-192949 http://mooneyspace.com/topic/4734-minimax-tug/?page=1
  15. Monroy tanks

    From what I hear, Edison worked for Jose Monroy for years. He has probably installed more Monroy tanks than anyone. http://www.wetwingologistseast.com/Services-Warranty.html