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As the topic title implies, I'm a newby with a Mooney. That is, I've been flying Bonanzas - three since 1984 - but this most recent venture was somewhat of a departure from my norm...and have to say I'm glad I did it. I became a 50% share owner in a '62 M20C about 3 weeks ago and am currently flying insurance time off with an instructor - weather permitting in Okla. 

 

I have a few questions that perhaps some of you can help me with.

 

1) I don't have maint. or IPC manuals yet but am getting them ordered (I'm an AP/IA and will be doing all the work that I can on it for the 50/50 partnership). I take it the jack points are where the wing tiedown bolts are located when you screw the tiedown bolts out. Question: Is there some kind of adapter to be used that screws into the wing (captured by a nut internally) for using a set of jacks? I can't see jacking the wings there with the tips that are on my jack rams. There must be some kind of conical adapter to accept the conical shape machining in my jack ram ends, right?

 

2) If I ever wanted to upgrade to an IO-360, is there an STC out there that will allow this, and if so, who might I contact? The current O-360 has about 1500 hrs SMOH so I (we) might be looking at an upgrade to "injected" if such exisits. 

 

3) Right tank has started weeping. Looked at the "Weep No More" website to gain some sealed-wing repair insight and I gather that it's a mess and expensive to do. Question: What can we expect to pay to have one tank re-sealed if I have someone else do it?

 

Last item is just a comment: I give great credit and thanks to the previous owner who had all the speed mods done, new glass, paint, interior, avionics, etc. Harvey and I are its caretakers now and will do our best to maintain its updated beauty and functionality. And secondly, I'm amazed at the speed and economy I've seen so far on a couple of short x-country flights. Can someone tell me if this is real.... 24 square, 46F OAT, 5500 msl, IAS 156 MPH, lean to rough / rich to smooth with a single CHT at 385 F, 2.2 flight hours and topped it off with 17 gallons?? That's not even 8 GPH. 62DX has extensive speed mods installed so that must be playing into its apparent speed and economy.

 

It's been and will continue to be fun learning a different airplane. It's tight in the cabin, not the easiest to get down into from the wing and has that Johnson bar to master without your airport buddies calling out the fire trucks when you depart. Other than that, it shines with its simplicity, and economy. I'm glad to be a Mooney owner!

 

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PM me, I'll send you some of the info you are looking for. as for the upgrade, there is an STC out there but you would be better off just finding an E model instead of trying to upgrade the C. for the fuel tank issues, around 8k for a complete reseal depending on where you go and between 8-10 K for the O&N bladder. you can also opt for just a repair , that will obviously be cheaper but there are no guarantees that it wont start leaking else where. it's great to have you on board and nice to see an older mooney finding a good home

 

Brian

61 M20C 

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The jack points that I bought are only chrome plated acorn nuts with a washer under it followed by a nut, on a short threaded stud. You can set up your own from the aviation section of Lowes or Home Depot. Not as fancy as the stainless steel combination tie down and jack points LASAR sells.  

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Took me two years to figure out how to get in.

Step into the cabin with your right foot. Take hold of the ceiling strap with your left hand. Swing your left foot in and deposit yourself gracefully into your chariot.

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3) Don Maxwell has a great article and method for finding and fixing minor leaks, which I have used successfully. Link below:

 

http://donmaxwell.com/publications/MAPA_TEXT/_overlay/Fuel%20Tank%20Repair_How%20We%20Fix%20Them%202-05.htm

 

Note: I think it's easier to leave some fuel in the tanks instead of using soap.

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Your performance numbers sound about right.  

 

As for raising the gear... everyone has their methods but I found that if I trim the plane for the initial climb out, I can fly hands free while raising the gear.  That way I'm not tempted to yank on the yoke when pushing down on the Johnson bar.  Presto, no Mooney waggle!

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Welcome aboard 62DX,

1/2 a C has got to be better economics than any of the previous three brand Bs...

You will enjoy working on your bird. The search button at the top right may help you find some answers as well.

Best regards,

-a-

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Your performance numbers sound about right.  

 

As for raising the gear... everyone has their methods but I found that if I trim the plane for the initial climb out, I can fly hands free while raising the gear.  That way I'm not tempted to yank on the yoke when pushing down on the Johnson bar.  Presto, no Mooney waggle!

My first departure in 62DX left some ground viewers wondering if this was s good thing for me or not. I have since, after about 4 or 5 take-offs, managed to make a continuos smooth and flowing transition of the Johnson bar such that it is no longer a thrill to watch me depart. Everything takes a little getting used to and I guess I'm getting there, gradually. Your tip is a good one because that's exactly what I was doing, I tended to use the yoke as reaction point....not good. Thanks for your wisdom.

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I'm teaching my instructor to do the Johnson bar from the RIGHT SEAT !.. This is a chore since for me the release is at my thumb, for him, he has to use a forefinger. We find the key is speed. Keep it below 90 mph (80 if possible) and move the lever without stopping.

BILL

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Johnson bar gear comes up at 80 MPH.  It will be easy and smooth.  If you try to raise it at 90 MPH, it will be hard, and you'll get a nice right arm workout.

 

Your performance numbers are about right.  You will find that it performs best speed-wise from 7,000 - 10,000 ft with a wide open throttle and leaned as you describe, at 2500 RPM.  If you want to slow down a little and stretch your fuel even farther, reduce RPM to 2400 or 2300, or fly at 11,000-12,000 feet.

 

Everybody who has looked into it on this site has determined the IO-360 STC makes no financial sense.

 

The C model is an incredible amount of bang for your buck.  Enjoy, and welcome.

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I'm teaching my instructor to do the Johnson bar from the RIGHT SEAT !.. This is a chore since for me the release is at my thumb, for him, he has to use a forefinger. We find the key is speed. Keep it below 90 mph (80 if possible) and move the lever without stopping.

BILL

 

 

delete

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My first departure in 62DX left some ground viewers wondering if this was s good thing for me or not. I have since, after about 4 or 5 take-offs, managed to make a continuos smooth and flowing transition of the Johnson bar such that it is no longer a thrill to watch me depart. Everything takes a little getting used to and I guess I'm getting there, gradually. Your tip is a good one because that's exactly what I was doing, I tended to use the yoke as reaction point....not good. Thanks for your wisdom.

 

you have potentially opened a can of worms:  when to retract gear.   I have a johnson bar and inner gear fairings.  I have to raise my gear almost immediately after taking off.  Otherwise the wind resistance is too much for me unless I lower the nose.  If you raise the gear before too much speed builds up, it really isn't difficult to do.

 

once you get the hang of it, you'll like the johnson bar.  pretty darn dependable and very little that can go wrong with it.

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The Johnson bar will become second nature before you know it. After liftoff and positive rate of climb, gear comes up in one fluid motion. Don't worry, the nose bobbing will soon stop. Just keep your eyes outside and don't look at the Jbar.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

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Just flew another 1.7 hrs off the insurance 10 hr requirement and things are looking progressively better with me and that Jbar relationship. Speed does seem to be the critical aspect, just as most replies have advised - initial climb out at 80-85, raise the gear and it's no big deal. On one departure though, didn't get the gear up before reaching 100 and the difference was significant. Some time previous, I had spoken with my partner about gear up technique after exceeding 85 and he said no biggie, just do the Mooney "dip" (???). After explaining its simplicity I tried it yesterday and at 100 + a few on climb out, the bar nearly flew out of my hand and into its floor lock. Doesn't take much zero G to unload the gear on its upswing and into the wells. I do prefer the normal method at initial climbout speed of 80-85. Makes for a smoother transition with no abrupt/odd pitch changes during initial climb.

 

Thanks to all for your advice and the welcomes. I look forward to being an active member here to learn and pass on to others what might be helpful to them someday.

 

Happy New Year!

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I have a total of 3 flights in my new to me M20B and I love this plane. My right hand is a little bloody from hitting the sweat belt clip when putting the Jbar down. Not a lot of room between the seats. Your plane looks awesome.

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I have a total of 3 flights in my new to me M20B and I love this plane. My right hand is a little bloody from hitting the sweat belt clip when putting the Jbar down. Not a lot of room between the seats. Your plane looks awesome.

Until you get used to it, you can flip the seat belt buckle upside down so you don't accidentally unbuckle yourself during gear extension.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

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I have a total of 3 flights in my new to me M20B and I love this plane. My right hand is a little bloody from hitting the sweat belt clip when putting the Jbar down. Not a lot of room between the seats. Your plane looks awesome.

 

I had to adjust my seat belts so it clips a little more towards my front and less on the side.  I bloodied my right hand a few times prior to that.

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You can upgrade a C to an E (i.e. carburated to injected)...... I wonder if you could upgrade from a C to an E with an IO-390.... skipping a couple steps. I have an IO-390 on order for my E at the moment. It was only a few thousand more, but you'd need a new prop (Hascimitar.... doesn't really cost more than a standard non-scimitar hartzell).. If your prop is run-out, then that is an option

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