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  2. IF you end up in a G1000 Mooney, you'd be wise to hold out for one with WAAS and the GFC700 as at least you'll have the best autopilot and ability to fly all approaches. There may or may not be an upgrade path from there, but you'll likely be just fine with that kit. ADS-B might still be sub-optimal, though...ie no IN on the G1000. Budget issues aside (I'm flying a '77 for a reason!), I'm glad I don't have a G1000 in anything. I got a double WAAS upgrade for $3300 in 2007 and shudder at the costs for G1000 today, if you can even do it. You have to scrounge up used units since Garmin shut the production line down. It looks like I can install a brand new PFD/MFD, backup, AND autopilot soon for less than the cost of a WAAS upgrade in the G1000. Sent from my LG-US996 using Tapatalk
  3. Maybe there will be a side by side comparison at Airventure that someone can check out. Thanks for the explanation.
  4. Mine is and I investigated about 18 months ago. Cant remember the exact cost, but it was some insane amount. I bagged it.
  5. Garmin will be happy to sell you the whole modern kit at a premium! [emoji39] Seriously, though, I can't wait to go fiddle with both systems next week. I bet the booths will be packed. Sent from my LG-US996 using Tapatalk
  6. My guess that I've stated here long ago is that it could be purely a paperwork exercise for Mooney, or an engineer that really digs into the structural details, which perhaps is what Rocket did back then. I bet Mooney bumped the J GW up when they did to offset the fat that creeped in during the 80's...sales were declining as the liability suits went crazy, and an older J at the time (which means ~10 years or less, not 40 like today!) could carry significantly more than the new ones. Voila, suddenly they have 1000+ lb useful loads again, just like my '77. But they couldn't let the early ones end up with 1150 lbs of useful load...so they have the cutover point and claimed some minor tube change in the fuselage was the reason, which would be too difficult to retrofit... Sent from my LG-US996 using Tapatalk
  7. Candela is the brightness of the beam, you can get nearly infinite candela with a narrow enough beam thus my comment about a beam pattern,. Lumens is the total light put out, same lumens for a narrower beam is higher candela this is why you see taxi lights with much lower candela for the same lumens. As far as I'm aware the best in-the-lab LEDs today get 200 lumens per watt. Assuming that Whelen is using those(hint: they aren't) with the about 45 watts that light draws they could hit 9,000 lumens. In reality those 2 lights seem to be fairly close on specs. I'd guess the Whelen has the edge on reflector design, but until a third party does a shoot-out there's not really a good way to see which one would 'win'.
  8. The SunSpot says 150k candela vs the 157,557 candela listed on the link above for the Parmetheus PRO. The SunSpot also claims 7,700 lumens but I don't know how all that translates or relates to each other beyond the higher the number the brighter the light.
  9. That's ashame. The D10A looks so dated. It hasn't changed since it came out circa 2004. If I'm spending $40k on a sophisticated and advanced EFIS system like the Skyview I would want an equally sophisticated looking back up AI.
  10. It's part of the line that Whelen got when they purchased LoPresti. It looks to be this one(with a little more specs): https://flywat.com/collections/led-landing-taxi-recognition-lights/products/parmetheus-plus-46-series-led-landing-and-taxi-light Although as usual there are no lumens or beam pattern specs listed.
  11. I just saw this on the Spruce website just now. Does anything know the specs on this new Parmetheus light? I can't find any mention of it on the Whelen website. For $599 if better be f***ing bright. But is it brighter than the AeroLEDS Sunspot? https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/elpages/lopresti-11-16621.php
  12. Today
  13. As we have all established post 231 planes the only turbo models are rockets and TLS/Bravo planes available that are not acclaims. A few questions if I were to look at purchasing Bravo. The early 2000 models- 1. What is TBO 1800 or 2000 hrs. 2. Does the FIKI TKS system require a lot of maintenance? Does it have problems with porous holes getting plugged up a lot with bug guts? 3. Do most of you find that the engine is making TBO and beyond if you fly your engine the proper way and cruise around 75% power? 4. Does the landing gear motor still have the clutch back spring issues? same motor for the last 40 years of Mooney's? 5. Is the wastegate differential pressure controller reliable and trouble free? Supposed to be the most complex one out there 6. Please provide any input on what to really pay attention to and make sure it works or is corrected or inspected before buying? Thank you Everyone
  14. Where does it say the $40K-$50K includes the new IFD navigator. On the Dynon Bonanza example price list it’s $45K and doesn’t show one.
  15. Prayers to family...can’t imagine how tough his life adjustment will be.
  16. Be looking for the dead leg... It resides between the two static ports in the tail... Probably a four way intersection...left side, right side, dead leg to collect water, and then the tube that goes to the static instruments up front... It is quite possible, somebody didn’t know why the dead leg was there... Find the official drawing to see what it is supposed to look like... Water getting up to the instruments is bad... and should be avoided... Most often the drains are completely empty... checked every flying day... A good sideways rain, can fill the static system with a lot of water... PP thoughts only, -a-
  17. So Where I was seeing this happening is usually Less than 3500 ft and about 120 to 110 mph it doesn't happen on all flights just some. The Hundredth needle probably+/- 300 ft bounce. I don't have static drain currently installed. I was suspecting that water was in the static line would/could displacing causing needle to bounce. Then again I could be way off it was just a hunch on my part. It is a dual static ports while a single line running to front of the airplane probably 1ft above the pilot's knee, it has pneumatic multiport adapter that feeds all the static interments (G5's, Altimeter, VSI, ASI, encoding altimeter) same for the pitot system. I am pretty sure that it is original pitot and static lines. The Pitot & Static systems was switched over to the pneumatic PTC (Push to connect) style connectors. I couldn't find anything in the AC 43-13 to telling me explicitly which pneumatic connectors to use nor was there anything explicitly saying what type static line(s) to use. The experimental guys use connectors must be good. ;-). I have ask IA's and they seem agree that there is not real guidance on which pneumatic connectors and pneumatic lines, and pneumatic fittings to use for "approve" and or "acceptable" installations. So as I understand it you could go to Lowes Aerospace or your local aviation aisle in Home Depot or Napa store to get your pneumatic fittings. James
  18. Another source of alternator whine... it comes with bad diodes. find the bridge, and visually inspect... diodes often fail leaving ugly marks of heat related damage... The alternator will appear to work properly, but it is missing some current that is not getting out... if it is a diode... PP thoughts only, -a-
  19. Easier to follow I-80 and stay north. If you go south, stop at MTJ.
  20. Check and rebond all the engine to airframe grounds. You are describing a whine, not a tick, leave the ignition leads and plugs alone. I have a real good story about a Baron project, I built a radio package in it while the engine shop overhauled both engines. Lots of whine when we flew it. Mechanics were convinced it had to be my work because that's where we were hearing the problem. It turned out to be a finger tight bolt on one of the ground straps of the left engine, and I found it! Noise can weaken the strongest of knees, let me know if I can help you. WebairConsulting.com 616 822 1999
  21. Also know as the first application of a hybrid drive train... It also works with Firebirds... when the gas engine runs out of juice (ignition, or gasoline), the electric motor gets it to a safe parking area... could be a half mile away. The sensor is behind the clutch pedal... just unplug... Best regards, -a-
  22. All the reasons you listed are why I wanted the rocket. Power when I want it, Efficiency when I want it. A good engine monitor is on my list... In the meantime I will be running ROP and nice and cool on the TIT.
  23. I just shopped insurance and the only info I can contribute is that they told me if there were more than 3 owners it was considered a flying club and the rates were higher.
  24. Brad’s plane on an ordinary day... -a-
  25. I have a low, single digit O... -a-
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