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kortopates

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kortopates last won the day on August 30

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About kortopates

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    Won't Leave!
  • Birthday January 21

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    San Diego, CA
  • Reg #
    252AV
  • Model
    M20K 252/Encore

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  1. Too bad that Mooney is too far south in Southern California. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. Wow, that's a huge leak!! Glad you found it on the ground it needs to go to your favorite fuel system specialist repair station asap! They run about 1 AMU to OH, at 20 years it will probably need one but starting with an inspection will get you an estimate of what it needs. This shouldn't be at all related to CSB19-01A since it replaced a hose for metered fuel between throttle body to fuel divider - nothing to the fuel pump. Also It looks like the pump has already complied with an earlier SB to replace the brass arm with a steel one - so you look good there. (The brass one woul
  3. I would agree that technology and innovation can play a huge role to reduce these incidents but I think Pipers solution was proven to be too dangerous - given it's killed people on go arounds and in higher DA situations. Personally, I really think solutions like the P2 Audio Advisory system are the right way to attack this. Only problem though is most pilots are in denial about how easily this happens in the right situations and don't think they need it till after they have done the unbelievable. And in this current insurance market some get a nasty surprise that their insurance won't renew a
  4. There are actually two K models for rent in SOCAL - a 231 at Santa Monica (Santa Monica Flyers) and a 252/Encore at CRQ (Pinnacle) . This is most unusual to see Turbo Mooney's for rent. I really don't recommend checking either of these out though. It'll ruin your future prospects for ever flying a NA again. Once you experience benefits of Turbo few could ever go back to NA! The other option is a very early M20A or B at Dubois at Chino. For any of these, you would join the club or school and then use one of their instructors.
  5. They're small tube pointing into the wind on the bottom of the wing to the side past the tank. In the modern Mooney's they are in a small NACA duct embedded into the wing bottom pointing into the wind. Vintage Mooney's they can be aluminum tubing come down and making a 90 bend into the wind. Those with bladders will see a de-ice mast directly in front of the vent tube. This usually happens from insects nesting in the tubes when parked on the ramp. I personally wouldn't insert something as large as a allen key wrench into the vent tube. Instead I recommend using some .032" safety wire
  6. Sure, the point about the open pilot clause is that it only ensures you the owner. Say the worst happened, the insurance company would make you whole. But the CFI or any pilot meeting the open pilot clause is not insured under your policy - just you and any other named insured - and after paying off you they could subrogate against your CFI or pilot operating under the open pilot clause to cover their losses. The open pilot clause just ensures that anyone meeting those requirements keeps the policy in effect or operation insured. Therefore when it comes to instructing pilots in owner aircra
  7. I'd suggest you contact @mike_elliott He's is Florida on the Gulf coast and if he can't do it, he has some other Mooney CFI's that can. Realistically, I'd give up the notion of flying your family in the bird for Christmas, these things always take longer than you expect and very often the ferry flight reveals some maintenance needed. Plus you've mentioned you can only fly weekends and you're going to need every one of those 10 hrs of transition training if not more, doing maneuvers and landings, before you're ready to solo. Although the cross country will be a great learning experience an
  8. Often when planes are repossessed by the bank, do to the circumstances, the plane gets auctioned without logbooks. @Mcstealth answered the question though if they were available.
  9. Is your battery in the back by chance or up by the engine. If the former, it’s quite a job to pull a new wire from battery through interior and firewall to power surefly! But realistically, you can barely do anything in 1-2 hrs, perhaps remove and re-install mags during annual but not installing a new ignition system and new wires to plugs. Then the STC 337 paperwork ... Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  10. Typo - I meant to say Throttle to idle -- never ever actually killing the engine!! Must have been thinking about this incident. Never have come close to losing an engine yet simulating an engine out, just need to warm them up. Thanks for letting me know, I'll correct that typo above too.
  11. Good questions Rob, first I have to say I don't do any of this unbriefed in advance. Before the flight, we discuss the engine out emergency glide range and power off landing procedures as well as the expected rate of descent per their POH. This includes how we expect to glide to above an airport if we have excess altitude, then lower the gear and perform 360's abeam our intended point of landing - which is the instrument landing zone a 1000' down the runway (not the threshold so as to give us runway buffer if we came up short). Then we'll go out and do it, combining the emergency glide to the
  12. That's one way to look at it, and the really positive thing is that only aluminum was bent, nobody was hurt in this training incident. But the FAA says "AIRCRAFT UNABLE TO RESTART ENGINE DURING ENGINE FAILURE SIMULATION, LANDED IN A FIELD AND GEAR COLLAPSED, NEWTON, UT." Pulling the engine to idle, is not shutting it down - far from it. How it was shutdown we don't know, but the FAA report, which could be wrong says it was shut down. But we also know the engine was shut down no where near gliding distance of an airport. Logan was about 15 mi away. And it also appears based on lack of
  13. This is also discussed in the gear up thread as this weeks latest incident, middle/end of page 13
  14. If you look at the handful or so of recent ADS-B snippets of flight tracks, there is a repetitive theme of short half hour flights in the same area between Logan and Preston. But the odd thing is they appear and end no where near an airport. Although it could be due to flying to low to stay in Ads-B contact but it leaves me curious as to the aircrafts home base. Unfortunately there was even a snippet of incident flight. Looking at the picture of the downed aircraft with overcast skies probably explains that from having to fly low to stay VMC and thus avoiding ads-b coverage. What we know
  15. Some refinements, .... Yeah somewhere between 6.14159265359 and .14159265359 But I thought Speed is everything to Mooney Rocket pilots but Efficiency is everything to most pre-long body pilots. But you got to have your bird looking like it fly's fast to actually really go fast - hence aesthetics like ditching the antenna farm. Cheap is everything to the 4 cyl Vintage Mooney pilot. But I wouldn't discount numerical accuracy, to many engineers and PhDs in this forum. But its humorous how we so often use it to justify our choices.
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