Ftlausa

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About Ftlausa

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    KFXE
  • Reg #
    N436PS
  • Model
    M20R

Recent Profile Visitors

753 profile views
  1. Sun n Fun

    Flying into Plant City and Ubering. The LAL operating times are too limited for me.
  2. Mooney Shirts and stuff...

    Its about time they did this. Just placed too big of an order for stuff.
  3. Cirrus aircraft have all the bells and whistles you could ever want in a single engine GA aircraft. The automation appeals to well healed lower time pilots with excess disposable income. And the parachute appeals to them and their passengers. I have a fair amount of time in Cirrus aircraft, and I just don't like the way they fly. They are not a good handling airplane in my opinion, particularly low and slow. I know they got their accident rate down, but they still have lots of stall spins. I do like the parachute for the right emergency, and I definitely like the extra interior space and 4 point harness to reduce the head bumps on the ceiling. As much as I hate to say it, I will probably end up getting one at some point as my last plane for the peace of mind it will give my wife -- but I won't enjoy flying as much as I do in my Mooney.
  4. Bad day for Mooney’s on Spruce Creek

    If one is getting a stall warning on the base to final turn, then remedial training is indicated. That is probably the worse time possible to be close to stalling. A stall there means a whole different type of "gear up landing."
  5. There is something you don't see everyday

    There is only one I see for sale posted online. The pictures look old, and the equipment original. I hope there are some good examples out there that are being well cared for.
  6. I have been struggling with high temps in #5 in my Ovation. Is the addition of that hole effective?
  7. Another one bites the dust

    I had heard that the TTx was a maintenance hog, and that's a big part of the reason I did not buy one. However, the cockpit was very nicely laid out and it was a good flying plane. IMO, they are a much nicer plane than the Cirrus. No doubt, if the TTx had a chute they would have sold a whole lot more of them. When better planes are losing out to inferior planes with a chute, it has to be the chute that is bringing the sales.
  8. Cessna (Textron) has announced that they will no longer manufacture the TTx (formerly Columbia/Cessna 400) due to low sales. Textron also manufactures the Beech Bonanza, and since it also suffers from low sales, I wonder if it is next of the chopping block. Cirrus on the other hand, is selling planes at a very sustainable rate. One can only hope that Mooney will pick up some sales that would have been lost to the TTx. At the Mooney Summit, the Mooney factory rep said that Mooney forecast that Cessna and Cirrus were focusing less on piston sales, and that this presented an opportunity for Mooney. On one level, I am sorry to see the TTx go (it was clearly the better of the composite airplane choices), but if it boosts Mooney sales and makes Mooney sustainable, then good will come from bad.
  9. Get the rating.

    "Are they going to be alright?" was the question my wife asked me on a flight through Georgia this week as we listened to an increasingly panicked VFR Cherokee pilot with 4 on board, with low fuel, at night, that was trapped between solid undercast and overcast layers being vectored around by ATC looking for a whole in the clouds that was not to be found. This was the darkest night I have ever flown, with solid cloud bases blocking out the ground lights, and solid overcast blocking the partial moon and stars. It was frankly chilling hearing ATC ask the pilot, over a series of several minutes, if he was IFR qualified -- "No"; how many on board -- "4"; fuel reserves "45 minutes"; and hearing the pilot's voice getting increasingly panicked as he was aimlessly vectored around looking for a hole in the clouds as we moved from twilight to pitch black. ATC asked me if I had seen any breaks in the clouds, which we had not for 40 to 50 miles. The regional jet that had just landed at Augusta reported solid overcast from about 3,500 feet to a breakout of 2,600 feet. With inadequate fuel to go anywhere else, ATC was setting the pilot up for a straight in decent through the clouds when we got the frequency change to the next sector. The rest of my flight home that night was quite somber as we wondered whether the occupants of the Cherokee were alright. I did not see any reports of a downed aircraft in the news the next day, so apparently he made if down safely, but this was not a situation that any VFR pilot should want to find themselves. As dark as it was, and with the over and undercast, this pilot was forced to fly instruments for quite a while, and I am glad that he was proficient enough to maintain control of the aircraft. I am sure the VFR purists will say that it was the pilot's fault that he got himself (and 3 others) into the predicament through poor planning, but sometimes the weather does not do what is forecast. This incident was a poignant reminder of why I got my instrument rating, and a clear example of the value of one.
  10. Acclaim Type S market value.

    I would have the same question/concern about useful load. But what an amazing combination of comfort and utility in one aircraft.
  11. I can give you my most solemn promise that if thought you were being that successful in distracting me, I would hit the "isolate" button on the audio panel, or throw you out of the airplane. You can ask my current wife about the first of those options, and my ex-wife about the other.
  12. I do not subscribe to that philosophy with respect to gear up landings. If you follow GUMPS and confirm that the gear are extended, this should not happen. There is always the possibility of a mechanical malfunction that also keeps the manual gear extension from working, but that accounts for a small fraction of gear up landings. I check the "football" at least twice to confirm the gear are down, including as part of my "centerline" check on final.
  13. A-10 "Grunts in the Sky"

    I guarded the A-10s while enlisted in the Air Force. Of all the different kinds of planes I guarded, the Warthog was the one I most wanted to fly. The F15 being a close second.
  14. Get the rating.

    Don, unfortunately, my experience is that all too often, it's the bottom third that is becoming the judges - at least in state court.
  15. Get the rating.

    Ask to be re-vectored. If asked why, tell them you need time to enter/dial in the approach.