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StevenL757

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StevenL757 last won the day on July 3 2016

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    N21625
  • Model
    Ovation3 - TKS
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    KISP

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  1. Box of 12 Tempest massive plugs. Brand new, never opened. Came with my factory-new IO550N8B engine. I have a box of fine-wire plugs that are going in, and don't need these. $275 and I will cover shipping anywhere in the US. Price below is Spruce's for reference. PM me, or let me know if interested here. Steve
  2. Understood. The first data point on the 275's calibration procedure is always the most difficult to obtain - largely-due to the vibration of the engine. Some airplanes exhibit this more than others, and the instrument is surprisingly very responsive to any vibration that it doesn't "like". The good news is once that initial data point is captured, the rest of the process generally goes smoothly. A few suggestions in addition to what you've tried... Shut the engine down and start it back up again. Sounds crazy (like someone telling you to "just reboot your computer - it fixes everything"), but it may help allow the instrument to sense a smoother running engine. Not desirable at all and I don't ever recommend it, BUT - as a one-time fix - you could start the airplane with the avionics powered and then attempt the calibration process. This has been known to produce very good results, but if your methods tried so far + the above don't work, you would work with two other people to hand-tow the airplane through the range of headings required to calibrate properly. You could do this with or without a power supply attached (probably ok if you have a small power supply and a long-enough extension cord) and can keep the airplane far-enough away from any large metal buildings (think massive hangars). Without a power supply (battery power only), pull any breakers for equipment that doesn't need to be running, then turn on your Master (your GI275 should turn on with the Master switch on - it shouldn't be on the avionics master), and run through the calibration process that way. You would be in the left seat, one person would be in the right seat manipulating the instrument and calling out the headings, and the third person will tow the airplane. Obviously, make sure the mags are off and you have a long-enough tow bar to allow the person towing to remain clear of the prop. Best of luck...hope some of this is helpful.
  3. You may want to have someone familiar with the calibration process (like a shop tech) sit on your right while you maneuver the aircraft. He or she can manipulate the instrument while you focus on maneuvering correctly. It needs to be done on a level surface away from large metal buildings, and preferably on a calm-wind day. Any adverse motion - save for the running engine - will give this error and won't allow the countdown to initially start. I've done this procedure probably 5 or 6 times in 2 airplanes. The turns should be slow, done at a consistent speed, yet stable-enough to stop the airplane on the headings warranted for the calibration to successfully complete.
  4. Have you considered a factory-new or factory-reman from Continental? Their lead times are much less than the 7+ months I’m seeing for other “boutique” OH shops. I just received my factory-new engine last month and waited about 3 months.
  5. I'd second Bill Jensen in a minute. He was an airline reference for me, as well as a good guy to get experience in a variety of aircraft. His DPE of choice is a tough cookie, but fair and thorough. @dzeleski and I are hangared about 200 feet apart from each other in the same airpark, so without stepping on his toes, am also happy to help out with anything you need. Steve
  6. $70,000 is a ballpark figure for the known-ice installation, which would yield roughly anywhere between $35 - $40k aftermarket. Inadvertent installations which run around $45,000 would yield more than $10,000 aftermarket, but certainly less than the aftermarket value of a FiKI installation.
  7. As @KLRDMD Ken pointed out, the $20-25k for an inadvertent system is about right. Known-ice is around $35k, and probably $40k-$45k from a motivated buyer. What's it worth to ME? Priceless. Probably one of the best tools on the airplane to aid in all-weather, all-season dispatchability.
  8. I used to own one...along with a TB-9. I've owned 2 Ovations since. Need I say more? :-) Seriously, they do require a fair amount of maintenance more than an Ovation in my opinion. Landing gear MX is particularly challenging. Finding parts for a French-made airplane isn't as much of a challenge as finding people WELL-QUALIFIED to work on them. They are few and far-between, and to find one, you may need to travel a fair distance (as I do from NY to TX for my Ovation) to get "that" mechanic who works on Trinidads on a regular basis...and is exceptional at it. I've known several owners who have just gone with someone convenient, and they've paid a hefty price...in more than one way. PM me if you want, as I have a contact number for you...probably the person most-directly and heavily-involved with all-things-Socata that I've ever experienced. He used to work for them for many years, and presently owns a TB-10 after having owned a -20 for years. Sign up for their forum as well if you haven't already done so. Steve
  9. Largely-agree. Jeppesen offers "bundle" options depending on what avionics package(s) you have. The "bundling" options cater obviously more to those with full-suite (all-Garmin, all-Avidyne, etc.) cockpits, but a call would definitely be in order to see what they can offer anyone with dissimilar hardware onboard. Also - calling them often yields better pricing than going online. Although you've been able to order subscriptions from Boeing/Jeppesen like ordering online from a restaurant, I've found in the past that by calling and actually speaking with someone, my rates have been a bit lower and they were able to adjust pricing downward somewhat. Steve
  10. If you run your engine ROP, it produces pennies. If you run it LOP...it starts producing quarters or better. Seriously, I hope this is nothing serious and that you get it sorted quickly and as inexpensively as possible. Steve
  11. Yeah, my running lights and anchor lights are next to my "Bilge Pump" switch...
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