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glafaille

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glafaille last won the day on June 26 2016

glafaille had the most liked content!

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About glafaille

  • Rank
    Lives Here
  • Birthday 03/21/1956

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Tyler, TX
  • Interests
    Things that fly! Good friends. Good food. Fun places.
  • Model
    Between Planes and shopping!

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  1. I understand your point. Just trying to avoid “rubber stamp” annuals which seem to be common with all older airplanes. It’s nice to see an occasional annual by a shop that specializes in the model of aircraft I am looking for. Especially if the plane is not local to me. Driving for hours to see a plane that is not as offered is frustrating and expensive. About 1/2 of the sellers I encounter are too lazy or technology challenged to figure out how to take pictures of their logbooks with a cell phone and email them to me.
  2. First thing I do is check the FAA Aircraft Registration Website to check for possible damage history and ownership issues. Watch out for partnerships as they can sometimes be awkward to deal with. Write down any damage history and be sure the plane you are interested in is the same one you are reading about online. Next, I visit flightaware to see how much the plane has flown the past couple of months, 10 hours per month is good, 2 hours per month not so good, no flights at all could be a problem (depends on ADS-B capability of aircraft). Next, I visit the FAA AD database and print al
  3. This particular airplane has been actively flown for years (75 hrs/ yr) and appears from the log books to have received better than average maintenance. Certainly not a “forever plane”. But for someone looking for cheap transportation, who knows?
  4. Don’t worry. It will buff out! I read about repairing similar dents on much more expensive airplanes. One technique involved a large ball bearing on the inside and a very strong electro-magnet on the outside. Sounds quite interesting.
  5. Thank you gentlemen for your opinions. It appears that most of you think it is likely to continue to pass inspection as it is.
  6. Former Tiger owner here, and professional pilot and most of all a pragmatic type. If the mission is cheap transportation then a Tiger fills the bill. It’s very close to the C in speed (135 kts true), carries the same load, has more back seat room, and does it all with a fixed pitch prop and fixed gear. It is cheap to operate, my insurance was just over $500 per year and annuals are cheaper because it takes less time to do one (no swinging of the gear). I flew mine all over the country in both VFR and IFR conditions. Sold it in preparation for retirement. However, if the mission i
  7. Had a little trouble with the picture. I think I got right now.
  8. Came across a plane for sale, obviously a “value” opportunity, not a “forever plane”. Before traveling to see it, the owner, to his credit, disclosed a ding picture. Said his IA has been signing off on it. Normally I would peek into the maintenance manual for guidance, but I don’t have access to one. What do you guys think? The flap can be easily replaced, it’s the wing that bothers me but then again, maybe I’m over reacting and it’s not critical.
  9. Should be an entry for rebalancing the ailerons, elevator and rudder after painting too. Not sure what has to be done after an undocumented paint job. Maybe rebalance the flight controls, reweigh the aircraft and off you go?
  10. I wish to take issue with that statement. I have over 5000 hours flying night freight in minimally maintained Beechcraft Barons with Continental IO-520 engines. Never had a problem with them and can’t recall anyone else in company having issues either. And we ran them to 1800 or 1900 hours with FAA approved extensions. The Beech Baron especially the C, D, and E are incredible flying machines! Tough as nails. We had to maintain 95% on time reliability per our contracts and no allowances for weather or mechanical problems. We flew ours about 10 hours per day, 4 to 5 days per week for
  11. Paul: Thanks for the tip. I have already contacted both of them. No luck so far. Gene
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