jonhop

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About jonhop

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    Lives Here

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    San Diego - KSEE
  • Reg #
    N57557
  • Model
    M20J

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  1. Wow... I got the GTX-345 installed last year and installation took less than a week. I posted the GTX-345's installation labor cost on MS somewhere. I also just recently installed a G5 AI in the place of my T&B coordinator and multiple shops made sure that I knew that the G5 could not replace a KI-256. I had already read the STC but they confirmed what I already knew because of research on MS and other sources. I chose to install the G5 AI because I still wanted a full featured AI in lieu of a turn coordinator during vacuum pump failure. Best of luck with getting the installer to correct your issues. Personally, I would not let them off the hook until you have a fully functioning autopilot. The autopilot is the most expensive component of your airplane and the installer should've known better than to disable / make it inoperative. They may have even violated the STC by removing the KI-256, unless you authorized it's removal knowing it would make the autopilot inoperative.
  2. My oil strategy for the IO-360. Main mission, one hour to 45 minute flights per week with an occasional long cross-country of three hours or more. Oil changes are completed by adding seven quarts + CAMGUARD. After engine run and inspection there is sevenish quarts of oil showing. With each subsequent flight the oil gets a little lower with evidence of oil escaping on to the belly, as well as the usual color change. When she gets put away, a small pool of oil can be traced from the drip pan to the rear of the gear door, to the breather hose before each flight. When the dipstick lands between the four and six quart line, one quart of oil is added. At this point, there is much less evidence of oil escaping the engine but it is still flowing out of the breather hose onto the gear door/drip pan when parked. For flights greater than three hours, seven quarts go in. Upon landing, I've had between five to six quarts showing on the dipstick, while there is a good bit of oil showing up on the belly. Oil temperature and pressures have been stable. Two additional quarts are carried in the baggage compartment. One quart is for when I hit the five quart line when away from home base and the other is because you never know when you will need it. During my PPL, I learned that carrying extra oil is easy and beneficial.
  3. Not sure about the NFlightCam product but I followed this DIY youtube video with no problems recording to my Hero 3 Silver. It was cheaper than buying a branded product.
  4. In the article comments section, one reader speculated that "it looks like the propeller on the starboard engine is feathered. He must have lost this engine. He was probably too heavy to maintain altitude while flying on one engine. He probably got below Vmc (min air speed to maintain control on one engine) and flat spinned into the ground." Seems logical.
  5. I think the time it takes to get an issuance from OKC may also be related to the type of referral. I was deferred for a condition that was signed off on my original medical. It only took two weeks to receive my 2nd class medical in 2015 with a letter explaining that additional deferrals for my condition would be at the AME's discretion. I have since switched to BasicMed, as I find it easier to have a conversation with my primary care physician than undergo a full blown physical.
  6. Flying in SOCAL has some nice views... taken on 19 April, 2019.
  7. Glad you had another soul aboard to help muscle the trim free and you both survived! Your scenario sounds eerily similar to one that @Amelia experienced. Hopefully she can chime in. Also the search feature can be your friend. "Amelia", "runaway trim", "trim failure", "trim", etc... Following the search result strings are each an opportunity for high velocity learning.
  8. FWIW, I received my PPL in 2004 while learning to fly a 172. I took an extended hiatus from actual flying in 2006 with 96 hours total time due to life and relegated myself to the simulator realm. When I stopped flying, I could grease the 172 on. After life settled in 2013, I had the time and found flying again. I attended a rusty pilot seminar and found a CFI knowing that I was going to be shopping for a Mooney, Tiger AA-5B, or 182 in the near future--thank goodness I found a mission that allows flying! I commenced refresher flight training--BFR-- in the Tiger, while including one hour in a 182. I bounced between the Tiger and 172 over the course of the flight review and my landings were the best in the Tiger followed by the 182. My CFI signed off on my BFR and club approval to fly the Tiger first. He wanted another hour checkout--focused on landings--with him to use the club's 172. My touchdowns were a bit inconsistent in the 172. I was surprised given my total experience came from high-wing flying up to that point. Shortly after, I found and purchased my J and my landings were smoother than the 172 and on par with the Tiger. I probably could've completed my BFR in a few hours versus five but I chose to evaluate possible future aircraft purchases. I chalk my better landings in the Tiger and Mooney due to greater ground effect. I find that I can use that extra cushion of air to maximize a smooth touchdown to a greater extent than a high-wing. The bottom line is, get your PPL in the most cost effective manner. As other M'Spacers have pointed out, you may be able to finish off your PPL in a low wing aircraft i.e. Piper Cherokee/Warrior or might I suggest Tiger / Cheetah. The choice depends on availability and cost but the Tiger is quicker than a 172 and was only slightly more costly in my club. Could be a wash with the Tiger's speed due to time in the aircraft with the prop swinging and a CFI to the right. But I recommend you pick an airplane type and FINISH your PPL! Then focus on transition training. May you find success in your flying endeavors, Jon
  9. Can't speak about the time-frame for a GNX375 install but AIE--https://www.aieinc.com/ -- at French Valley--F70--installed a G5 for me. The overall wait was three weeks with a two week delay due to shipping the G5 from Garmin. The install was also done immediately following the new year holiday. I lost use of the plane for nine days. My home drone avionics shop was booked solid from December to March. Best wishes for a speedy install...
  10. until

    Michael, I'll join if the weather permits. You may want to create a new thread in the General Aviation Talk section, as I found this event completely by accident. Thanks for initiating a future event. Regards, Jon
  11. I lost a center electrode on a Tempest FW. During the search for the electrode--borescope, oil change--there was evidence of it bouncing around in the cylinder before escaping. We didn't find the electrode in the engine or oil but several A&P's were of the opinion that it escaped via the exhaust, as it was too large to get past the multiple piston rings. I've had two oil changes since and there was nothing but carbon in the oil when strained. I agree with my A&P's assessments that it escaped via the exhaust. Tempest sent me a replacement plug but did not tell me if they were going to conduct a failure analysis. If Tempest did, I would doubt they would share the report. I've got 62 hours on the new plug and close to 200 hours on the others. Time will tell regarding their longevity but I now have a spare, just in case. I would buy them again, as I had fouling problems with my Champions. My engine ran smoother, hot started easier, and I've yet to foul one.
  12. @Alfredo, Glad you figured out your issue and got down safely. Also glad you joined the forum and started asking good questions, as I learn along with you from the tremendous knowledge-base of MS. I can't speak specifically to your alternate vacuum issue but this is why I replaced the electric turn and bank coordinator with a Garmin G5. I replaced the T&B due to my observation of the AI and the T&B during vacuum failure, while on a VFR flight. The AI was down right dangerous and the T&B bounced all over the place due to turbulence. I believe the Bonanza pilot Paul @kortopates mentioned had a T&B in place and still perished. As others have mentioned on this thread, it sounds like there is an effective way to use your installed alternate vacuum source in your recent scenario but as @Marauder pointed out, it may be safer/better to go a different route. E.g. approved EFIS AI replacements or other dual function products that provide AI functionality such as the AV-20 or AV-30. Just adding my 2¢ to a good conversation.
  13. A future aerospace engineer and pilot if I ever saw one!
  14. Mine stayed the same and I had a switch to Global.
  15. José, ??? The link let me too all kinds of electrodes but I don't see the ones with missing electrodes. Someone more knowledgeable than I will have to tell us if your concern for what damage a loose iridium wire might possibly do. (I did have an engine "swallow" an exhaust valve years ago. The head of that valve, which was hundreds of times larger than a plug wire electrode, did beat up the cylinder and piston surfaces pretty badly but did not interfere with the stroke and I still had 3 cylinders producing power and no oil loss.) You seem to like anecdotal evidence. When I bought my E the previous owner had been running massives. About half the plugs had been replaced and he carried 2 back up plugs in the plane just in case. I replaced the plugs with fine wires within 25 hours having had enough with fouled plugs and hard starting. I only bought 8 plugs, now 6 years old, and I no longer carry a spare. The 8th picture from the left in the link is mine. I lost the electrode following my EDM900 install and the subsequent pre-flight testing and runups. During the search for the electrode--borescope, oil change--there was evidence of it bouncing around in the cylinder before escaping. We didn't find the electrode but several A&P's were of the opinion that it escaped via the exhaust and that it was too large to get past the multiple piston rings and into the engine. I've had two oil changes since and there was nothing in the oil when strained. Judging by looking at the piston cylinder wall and marks in the top of the piston during the borescope, I would agree with the A&Ps assessments that it escaped through the exhaust. Tempest sent me a replacement plug but did not tell me if they were going to conduct a failure analysis. I've got 60 hours on the new plug and close to 200 hours on the others. Time will tell regarding their longevity but I now have a spare, just in case.