midlifeflyer

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midlifeflyer last won the day on December 15

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About midlifeflyer

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    Won't Leave!
  • Birthday July 26

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    http://www.midlifeflight.com

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    Male
  • Location
    Chapel Hill NC
  • Model
    M20J

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  1. midlifeflyer

    ILS vs LPV

    Could be either way. He might have heard that takeoff minimums don't apply to Part 91 and figured 0/0 landings were ok too. After all, this is the same guy who insisted in some early videos that 91.126 (the pattern direction rule) was only a recommendation.
  2. midlifeflyer

    Check Gear!

    I suspect in reality, there isn't much difference in our techniques. All I really said is we shouldn't hear the gear warning, so my pre-gear extension power reductions would be to a point above where the warning would sound.
  3. midlifeflyer

    Check Gear!

    I remember when Sporty's was selling those stick-on gear handles in their catalog . I always thought the "law of primacy" taught by them was, "if you forget it, don't worry. Nothing bad happens."
  4. midlifeflyer

    Check Gear!

    Based on 20 years flying and 12 of them teaching in Colorado, I guess I'll disagree with you on that. Those closer in descents were a reason for me to start slowing and putting the gear down earlier to take advantage of the increased drag.
  5. midlifeflyer

    Check Gear!

    Off-topic but interesting - this is the same concept which led the FAA to change "slow flight" in the ACS and started so much controversy.
  6. midlifeflyer

    Check Gear!

    One of the things I teach when I do complex transition training is that you never want to hear the gear horn in normal flight operations. I tell my students tongue in cheek it's because their boyfriend, girlfriend, life partner, spouse etc will hate the sound no matter how you explain it and won't fly with you again. But the real reason is two-fold. It means you have not planned the descent to the pattern adequately. And hearing a "warning" regularly diminishes its effectiveness as a warning.
  7. midlifeflyer

    Check Gear!

    I have two also divided between VFR and IFR. So far, they seem so habitual that when I delay for some reason, my right hand starts twitching. I had one instructor who started laughing. When I asked, he pointed at my hand which had, unbidden, moved to the ear handle and was hovering there. A guarantee some big distraction won't screw it up? Don't be silly. There are no guarantees. All we can do is what we try to do in all aviation. Manage the risk with good standard operating procedures comsitently applied.
  8. midlifeflyer

    Check Gear!

    One would think so, wouldn't one? Especially in the case of those two M20Ks @gsxrpilot mentioned. But folks have also landed gear up with the gear horn blaring. Solid, repeatable, SOPs which become habits are IMO the biggest answer.
  9. midlifeflyer

    Carb Ice Frequency for Mooneys

    I'm no mechanic but with heated air entering the carburetor instead of the nice cool air from outside, I would expect the cooling effects of air intake to have to battle the heating effects. I wouldn't be surprised to see an increase in both oil temperatures and CHT. I guess that's what the FAA's Aviation Maintenance Technician Handbook means when it says, Improper or careless use of carburetor heat can be just as dangerous as the most advanced stage of induction system ice. Increasing the temperature of the air causes it to expand and decrease in density. This action reduces the weight of the charge delivered to the cylinder and causes a noticeable loss in power because of decreased volumetric efficiency. In addition, high intake air temperature may cause detonation and engine failure, especially during takeoff and high power operation. Therefore, during all phases of engine operation, the carburetor temperature must afford the greatest protection against icing and detonation. There's also a discussion of how induction of snow or ice crystals can cause damage in much the same way as the ulfiltered air on the ground. In terms of power loss, the Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical knowledge indicates a loss of up to 15%.Makes sense to me. In my situation I was at about 12,000 MSL with temps around 70F. so over 15,000 ft D-alt. Using the 3% loss of power/ 1,000' rule of thumb, my 250 HP engine was already down to about 160 HP. I'm not sure how knocking off another 15% would be helpful.
  10. midlifeflyer

    Carb Ice Frequency for Mooneys

    Just a thought on using carb ice as a preventive vs using when you need it. Back in 1990, the NTSB made a recommendation to both the FAA and GAMA that carb ice should always be used as a preventive. They gave a number of reasons for it. It makes an interesting read, although it went nowhere. I came across it during research after my own carb ice event - a 250 HP Comanche at full cruise power in the clouds over the Rockies with the air temperature in the 70s. In addition to the NTSB report, I queried the ASRS (NASA Report) database and found a number of reports similar to mine and which echoed part of the NTSB findings - people who didn't detect carb ice soon enough, in part because, not using it regularly led to an "out of sight-out of mind condition" - no automatic mental association between low power and putting on carb heat. In my case, I did all sorts of trouble shooting and things I did automatically in the Comanche - boost pump on, went to best glide immediately, switched tanks, played with the mixture. I did apply carb heat - eventually - but too late to have effect when it was needed most. After breaking out (high ceilings, fortunately) within easy distance to an airport, I even unconsciously lowered the gear at the point in the approach where I always do. You name it, I did it. Except one essential - the one I did not do regularly. I can still see reasons for not using it as a preventive in aircraft where the POH calls for "as required" (a definitive Cirrus CAPS-style "consider" in the checklist/flow might be decent alternative) But in an aircraft where the manual says to use it as a preventive, I don't see a very good reasons to not get into the SOP habit.
  11. midlifeflyer

    ILS vs LPV

    Lots of things give me doubt I forget and didn't read all the comments. Did he say minimum flight visibility doesn't apply to Part 91 (incorrect) or did he say reported RVR doesn't apply to Part 91 (correct). (Although it's doubtful even an erroneous 1000 RVR would be off enough if the flight visibility is more than twice that.)
  12. midlifeflyer

    ILS vs LPV

    He actually did say that. A number of folks said he busted minimums and his answer to each was ""that is correct, flight visibility was much better than reported , the RVR reporting equipment is not perfect and my vision was much better than the GoPro displayed as I did have minimum visibility to continue to land."
  13. midlifeflyer

    ILS vs LPV

    He pulls the really bad ones eventually. Here's an annotated screen capture of the ILS I mentioned.
  14. midlifeflyer

    ILS vs LPV

    Jerry W
  15. midlifeflyer

    ILS vs LPV

    If you haven't been a watcher, you don't know this often happens. Jerry does something particularly bad. He thinks it's great (and has fans who agree) but he gets so much negative feedback about improper procedures, poor airmanship, possibly busting regs, and the proverbial "smoking hole," he removes it soon after. Usually they are the IFR ones. There's one where he exits the clouds on on the ILS in an unusual attitude - nose low , steep bank, airspeed in the yellow arc, VSI pegged at -3,000 FPM , all relaxed with his throttle hand resting on his knee. The amazing thing is that 90% of them involve flying the exact same approach. He regularly flies between Auburn and Oakland, CA. It gets even more cringeworthy when he goes somewhere less familiar. There was one a while back where he leaves an airport in Southern California to head back home. If I'm recalling correctly (it was one of the first IFR ones I saw and I was amazed) , it was Fullerton. He's given the Anaheim One SID, Lake Hughes transition. Takes off, is give a left turn and a heading "to join Victor 8," at which point he tosses the SID chart (this is pre-Garmin Pilot for him) into the back seat saying, "Well I'm done with the SID." ATC keeps wondering why he's not following the SID, finally realizes what they are dealing with (when he suggests he can go direct and cut through all that annoying SoCal airspace) and ends up vectoring him through the entire procedure.