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FAA change of acceptable EKG range.


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20 minutes ago, GeeBee said:

It has worked perfectly fine for our nuclear weapons programs.

Lawrence Livermore Labs has been run by UC Berkley with help from Bechtel.

Oak Ridge National Labs is operated by the University of Tennessee

Sandia National Labs is operated by Honeywell Inc.

I think an institution like Johns Hopkins, University of Washington, Cleveland Clinic, University of Pittsburgh et al could all operate the CDC more effectively and serve the United States better. 

And healthcare policy administered by universities and private agencies has likewise been a great success here, no? :)  Last I checked, we had some of the most efficient health care in the world :rolleyes:

 

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I think that Johns Hopkins, Cleveland Clinic and others have been a lot more on the target during the Covid Pandemic than CDC. Even the CDC Director admits its failure.

Going back to the Ebola failure. The CDC had a Gulfstream parked at Phoenix Air in Cartersville, GA. It was outfitted to transport highly contagious patients like Dr. Brantly. Yet.....they never thought to use it. They did not even remember they had it.  It was the people at flight ops with Samaritin's Purse and Emory University that came up with the plan to safely transport and treat (very successfully with a trial drug) Dr. Brantly.

When I ask a doctor (who was the CDC specialist in travel medicine) what to do about an infected passenger as well as how to protect the plane and she comes back telling me not to eat bush meat, when I restate and she still says, "don't eat bush meat" I am guessing we're not dealing with the best and brightest. At that point.....I want another doctor. 

 

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17 hours ago, GeeBee said:

Going back to the Ebola failure. The CDC had a Gulfstream parked at Phoenix Air in Cartersville, GA. It was outfitted to transport highly contagious patients like Dr. Brantly. Yet.....they never thought to use it. They did not even remember they had it.  It was the people at flight ops with Samaritin's Purse and Emory University that came up with the plan to safely transport and treat (very successfully with a trial drug) Dr. Brantly.

 

 

CDC does not own that Gulfstream. Phoenix Air does. Entities contract with Phoenix Air for specialized transportation. 

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23 minutes ago, WilliamR said:

CDC does not own that Gulfstream. Phoenix Air does. Entities contract with Phoenix Air for specialized transportation. 

I thought I made that clear. But to reiterate....Phoenix outfitted that Gulfstream for the CDC and they did not use it and forgot about it.

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On 1/17/2023 at 4:00 PM, ilovecornfields said:

I originally thought this was a link to an Onion article but was disappointed to learn (that like some Onion articles) people are taking this crap seriously. I loved the “Why we (sic) sure it was the vaccine that did it” and his very scientific approach to this problem.

For my mental health, I try not to argue with manipulative nut jobs on the internet (too much) but if you find his arguments persuasive then go ahead and skip the vaccine. I read 20-30 EKGs a day at work and order at least 10 high-sensitivity Troponin tests every day and have been doing so since before the first vaccine came out.  I think if there was some real widespread cardiac damage from the vaccines I would have seen it (and so would have thousands of other people who do the same thing I do).

But don’t believe me. I’m clearly just part of the conspiracy.

“Why we sure it was the vaccine that did it

There are several clues that are consistent with “it was the vaccine and not COVID”:

  1. They were quiet about it. If it was COVID, you can be public. But the vaccine is supposed to be safe.

  1. The timing. October 2022 is late for COVID. If it was due to COVID, it would have happened well before now. They can make changes every month.

  2. The vaccine creates far more injury to the heart than COVID (which creates NO added risk per this large-scale Israeli study of 196,992 unvaccinated adults after Covid infection).

  3. Anecdotally, cardiologists only started to notice the damage post-vaccine.

  4. All the sudden deaths started post-vaccine”

 

Hopefully you feel better after that rant.

 

The voices in my head tell me its my therapist who is actually crazy lol

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On 1/19/2023 at 6:19 PM, GeeBee said:

We here in the ATL have been watching the CDC gravy train for years. 

They failed spectacularly on the Bird Influenza of 2005-2006 

They had a complete institutional failure in the Ebola epidemic. Other agencies had to step in

Now we have the Covid failure which even the director of the CDC admits they botched

We can't afford any more failures. Three strikes. 

Contractors can fix it.  Especially the twenty-somethings.

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If they can't, then I would suggest abolishing the whole thing. Nothing is better than failure. Here is the thing about private running of the CDC. You eliminate political pressure of the administration de jour. The staff and supervisors are not political appointees doing as their political masters demand like studying gun control to make a political case, or police conduct rather than infectious diseases. A 10 year contract spans across administrations and influencers.

 

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Wait a minute….

Lets not get bogged down in the past…

The future is where the gambling is still open…

1) There is one country that failed to make a good copy of a known vaccine… and isn’t buying any known good vaccines from the US or Europe… is anyone getting the Sputnik vaccine from Russia?

2) They have used Lock-down technology to keep the spread to a minimum… kinda worked, but not really…

3) Of course, viruses don’t respect the communist driven lock down theory… must be a capitalist viruses at work…?

4) in that same country… a huge celebration with gigantic gatherings has started this week… they call it lunar new year…

5) Lunar new year, or Chinese new year, is a multi-week celebration… large family get togethers are the norm… parties in the streets… parties in crowded restaurants…

6) This multi-week shut down to celebrate future good fortune usually puts a dent and delay in the supply chain… as a standard SOP…

7) Are the people in China ready for the third round of Covid spread with no real vaccines and now no restrictions to gathering in large numbers?

8) There must be a lot of travel occurring to leave the country on a vaccine vacation…

9) I have seen the pharma industry up close… where a simple phaseIII (commercial) product launch takes years, while every I gets a dot, and a QA group inspects it again…

10) the big letter groups are horrible… see if you can find a better system.

11) Hmmmmmm privatizing sure can look interesting… :)

12) hospitals will be ready, people are always wearing masks…

13) Prayers that it is different this time… 

14) Something isn’t working anymore between China and Russia…
 

If you can speak FAA… it is very similar to speaking FDA… I haven’t seen CDC yet…  :)

Best regards,

-a-

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On 1/19/2023 at 1:50 PM, ilovecornfields said:

@GeeBee, I find your arguments persuasive and probably some of the most rational and well reasoned on this site. You are absolutely correct. We don’t know the long-term effects of anything until the long term has passed. This applies to novel diseases as well as novel vaccines. No one predicted post-polio syndrome until patients who had polio as children developed worsening muscle weakness as adults. People didn’t know childhood mumps led to infertility problems until those children tried to have kids.

In a time of uncertainty we have to choose between multiple unappealing options based on limited information. As an ER doctor, this is something I do every day. As an airline pilot, you probably had to do this as well.
 

Given the choice of the vaccine or the disease, I chose the vaccine. Is it a gamble? Of course. But having seen what the disease did in the short term (and not so short term) I tried to do everything I could to reduce the risk to myself and my family. Other people, given the same information, made different choices. I have no problem with this. What bothers me is people INTENTIONALLY spreading misinformation which they know to be false for personal gain.  I think that is inexcusable. People who don’t know what they’re talking about authoritatively trying to force their views on others is a close second and often seems to be more related to their political views than their particular knowledge on a subject. This is unfortunate.

I think those people may exist on both sides of the issue.

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18 minutes ago, GeeBee said:

As I’ve mentioned before, I have a close friend who works at the CDC and was involved in some of the guidance that was released by them. What her group recommended and what was published by the CDC were often quite different. There were at least a couple of times where the statements released were almost opposite of what had been recommended.

The CDC used to attract some of the top scientists in the country and the jobs were very prestigious and coveted. There are some great people working there but that doesn’t mean that organizational and external pressures can’t manage to corrupt their great work. Several of my friend’s colleagues resigned during the lat couple of years, some after working there for decades.

Hopefully the post-mortem on the COVID response will lead to a better CDC - one that can swiftly respond to a disease outbreak and can communicate accurate and useful information in a timely manner.

I’m sure educating public health professionals about how to respond during disease outbreaks will change as well. In grad school, we spent a single day talking about this. That was clearly inadequate.

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18 minutes ago, GeeBee said:

Interesting article. The answer to inept bureaucracy is……..MORE bureaucracy!!

 I am sure glad we have wise men in D.C. Such a novel idea would never occur to a dumb rube like me.

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5 minutes ago, ilovecornfields said:

As I’ve mentioned before, I have a close friend who works at the CDC and was involved in some of the guidance that was released by them. What her group recommended and what was published by the CDC were often quite different. There were at least a couple of times where the statements released were almost opposite of what had been recommended.

The CDC used to attract some of the top scientists in the country and the jobs were very prestigious and coveted. There are some great people working there but that doesn’t mean that organizational and external pressures can’t manage to corrupt their great work. Several of my friend’s colleagues resigned during the lat couple of years, some after working there for decades.

Hopefully the post-mortem on the COVID response will lead to a better CDC - one that can swiftly respond to a disease outbreak and can communicate accurate and useful information in a timely manner.

I’m sure educating public health professionals about how to respond during disease outbreaks will change as well. In grad school, we spent a single day talking about this. That was clearly inadequate.

CDC is not alone. The FBI could also use some introspection. Not very sanguine that any of it will happen. No studies or wise men to support my views. Just decades of watching my beloved country crumble.

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55 minutes ago, ilovecornfields said:

As I’ve mentioned before, I have a close friend who works at the CDC and was involved in some of the guidance that was released by them. What her group recommended and what was published by the CDC were often quite different. There were at least a couple of times where the statements released were almost opposite of what had been recommended.

The CDC used to attract some of the top scientists in the country and the jobs were very prestigious and coveted. There are some great people working there but that doesn’t mean that organizational and external pressures can’t manage to corrupt their great work. Several of my friend’s colleagues resigned during the lat couple of years, some after working there for decades.

Hopefully the post-mortem on the COVID response will lead to a better CDC - one that can swiftly respond to a disease outbreak and can communicate accurate and useful information in a timely manner.

I’m sure educating public health professionals about how to respond during disease outbreaks will change as well. In grad school, we spent a single day talking about this. That was clearly inadequate.

Milton Friedman once said, "If the Federal Government were in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there would be a shortage of sand."

What it means? If your existence does not depend on your product, soon the product will disappear.

What is the CDC's product? Data. Data that is needed to make cogent decisions in public  health. The CDC does not stake it's existence on data rather it sustains itself swimming in the political pool. 

Dr. Marty Makary, who I know personally from fundraising opined on this problem in an opinion piece.

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/cdc-secret-data-rochelle-walensky-marty-makary

Now you mentioned about your friend at the CDC getting buried, it is because of things like this:

https://thereload.com/emails-cdc-removed-defensive-gun-use-stats-after-gun-control-advocates-pressured-officials-in-private-meeting/

When the data does not match the politics and desires of the politicians, bury it and make sure it cannot be found.....like sand in the Sahara because you and your existence are not dependent on selling sand, but rather owning sand even if no one ever gets it or uses it.

Then they wonder why people accuse them of keeping sand behind the counter.

 

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5 minutes ago, GeeBee said:

Milton Friedman once said, "If the Federal Government were in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there would be a shortage of sand."

What it means? If your existence does not depend on your product, soon the product will disappear.

What is the CDC's product? Data. Data that is needed to make cogent decisions in public  health. The CDC does not stake it's existence on data rather it sustains itself swimming in the political pool. 

Dr. Marty Makary, who I know personally from fundraising opined on this problem in an opinion piece.

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/cdc-secret-data-rochelle-walensky-marty-makary

Now you mentioned about your friend at the CDC getting buried, it is because of things like this:

https://thereload.com/emails-cdc-removed-defensive-gun-use-stats-after-gun-control-advocates-pressured-officials-in-private-meeting/

When the data does not match the politics and desires of the politicians, bury it and make sure it cannot be found.....like sand in the Sahara because you and your existence are not dependent on selling sand, but rather owning sand even if no one ever gets it or uses it.

Then they wonder why people accuse them of keeping sand behind the counter.

 

Very well said!!!

 

For me, the more that the Canadian, and Provincial government try to say 'Do it this way ', the more I am certain it will be the wrong way.

 

I asked our minister of health, why during a so called pandemic, they laid off/fired 46.2% of the health care works, and forced more to quit.

Silence was all I got.

 

You don't get rid of your health care providers, and shut hospitals, or at least close large sections of those hospitals during a true pandemic, unless it was nothing more than a political mind control game.

They claimed our local hospital was over full.

What they didn't tell the public was that in 2020 they closed 5/8 of the Hospital, so they could claim it was full.

I was effectively fired, although they claim that I was laid off. It wasn't just me, but many of us were laid off/fired, for speaking out about the government lies. When we later filed a lawsuit, we were paid off immediately, long before the court date, because they would have been exposed in court.

I received more compensation than I was asking for.

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The company I currently work for interacts a lot with the CDC. They do some fantastic work over there. Just Like the FBI and other government agencies, politics has taken over the top tier and tainted the work of the good people who do all the hard work.

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3 hours ago, GeeBee said:

Dr. Marty Makary, who I know personally from fundraising opined on this problem in an opinion piece.

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/cdc-secret-data-rochelle-walensky-marty-makary

Interesting piece. His infectious diseases colleagues at Hopkins seem to disagree with him but he certainly got some attention.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/opinion/columnists/dan-rodricks/bs-md-rodricks-0901covid-20210831-llvxonipubfoxoit3vffalosr4-story.html

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3 hours ago, ilovecornfields said:

Based on my numerous interactions with healthcare administrators and politicians I favor incompetence over conspiracy, but it seems some people are more comforted by the latter.

No doubt incompetence abounds and no doubt that mere incompetence has at times wrongly been attributed to conspiracy. However history is rife with governments conspiring against their own citizens. Even in a highly educated western nation, many German citizens could not conceive their government would conspire against them until they found themselves in cattle cars rattling off to extermination camps.

Grant it there may not be a conspiracy behind every bush, but prudence would dictate that we look at least behind a few. 
I certainly don’t find “comforting” the thought of my government conspiring against me, but I find even less comforting the scoffing disavowals that such a thing could even exist. History shows otherwise.

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One important thing…

It is good to make change… and promote change…

You have to live, or stay employed, long enough to enact the change…  (don’t get fired, or offed)

:)

 

Now apply these thoughts to world politics…

They have freed the Panthers…

 

Ooops…

 

Keep in mind… MSers are not big fans of politics…

Mostly because nobody wants to hear about it here… especially if it doesn’t pertain to them…

Best regards,

-a-

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15 hours ago, carusoam said:

One important thing…

MSers are not big fans of politics…

Mostly because nobody wants to hear about it here… especially if it doesn’t pertain to them…

Thanks, Anthony! I abbreviated your post, to emphasize the more important parts. :D

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On 1/17/2023 at 1:29 PM, Mooneymite said:

This link is making the rounds on airline pilot union boards.  The new range is, apparently, fact.  The cause for the new range is speculation.

https://stevekirsch.substack.com/p/the-faa-has-very-quietly-tacitly

This might be good if your EKGs have raised the FAA's "interest".

A local AME has opined that the FAA is too slow and too disorganized for this to be a reaction to anything and this was something probably in the works for years...after that he added, "But I'm not going to get any more boosters". :lol:

Here’s an article from AOPA directly addressing this and other assertions by the author. https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2023/january/25/federal-air-surgeon-takes-on-tough-issues?utm_source=epilot&utm_medium=email. An interesting counterpoint with more context.

Cheers,
Rick

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