Jump to content

Is there an avionics school?


Mcstealth
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here locally, there is an AP school called Hallmark.  I noticed in their curriculum, there really was not much taught toward avionics. Why is that? On a related note, the local avionics repair shop techs said they were apprenticeship taught? Also, two of the techs are not AP's in the avionics shop. 

Is this normal?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Mcstealth said:

Here locally, there is an AP school called Hallmark.  I noticed in their curriculum, there really was not much taught toward avionics. Why is that? On a related note, the local avionics repair shop techs said they were apprenticeship taught? Also, two of the techs are not AP's in the avionics shop. 

Is this normal?

 

Yes, in fact it's normal in various areas outside avionics, too, e.g., engine, instrument, or accesory repair shops often have "repairmen" that are certificated by shop training to do one particular job, and their repairman certificate is only good as long as they work for that shop.    The shop is generally a certificated "repair station" with at least one A&P that provides overall repair authority and the shop has regulations or operating procedures that it has to abide by to maintain "repair station" status.   This covers specialized repair requirements so that people can focus on a particular thing without unnecessarily broad training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you looking to go to Avionics School or do you know someone that is?  If so, one reality check to go in with eyes wide open.  My avionics shop has gone through a few Avionics Graduates where they've chosen to leave within a few weeks of starting. 

Story goes that they get a big hype from the schools to get them to sign up, then do most or all of their work at a workbench.  All the "installations" they do are placing equipment into racks that are sitting on a bench.  But then when they get out in the real world, they're crawling around on the floor of GA planes or in tight avionics bays in larger planes.  But NONE of the physical work is what they were taught or thought they'd be doing while in school.  At least one guy (but I think two guys) when they told the shop they were leaving said it was because "this is hard work, not what it's supposed to be like."  So eyes wide open when you go into the school and may set up an internship on the side at a local avionics shop.

(Not an avionics guy, but built a few TV/Video studios in a prior life and have crawled around in a few tight spaces...)

Edited by PeteMc
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.