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AF1B Break-In


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Getting ready to break-in an overhauled engine.  Lycoming seems to have a fairly straight forward publication to follow.  Full power takeoff, 34/2400 shallow climb, get to cruise altitude and set power stay around 75% and watch the temps, oil etc..  

For 75% should I be around 29/2400 or 30/2300 or 31/2200?  I'm thinking 29/2400 and then drop MP when getting down to the 65% level.  Also, does altitude matter?

Anything specific I should be watching out for?  Any tips? 

 

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I couldn't find these settings in my POH but they do appear in the Lycoming TIO-540 Operating and Maintenance Instructions. They specify it in terms of RPM and fuel flow.

 

image.thumb.png.ca3086359b0b0eaae85df964a461b17e.png

 

On a turbocharged engine, altitude won't matter much. I would look at 3k feet AGL -- high enough to get set up to land and stay out of traffic, but low enough that you can get down quickly in case you have a fire.

I'm doing a breakin soon on a factory rebuilt, and I asked the Savvy techs what they recommend since Lycoming only publishes guidance for field-overhauled engines. They recommended performing the same breakin as specified for overhauls, at 75% for an hour, 65% for an hour, then WOT for 30 minutes. I was surprised that they suggested 20W50 as the break-in oil. Lycoming SI 1427C has the specs but apparently 20W50 is a match.

They also mentioned the Continental break-in guidance (attached) is generally applicable to Lycomings as well.

TCMEngineBreakInFlightTips.pdf

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Following Lycoming advice closely… should yield Lycoming expectations…

I don’t see any mention of changing rpm in your post.

Typical break in flights come with many changes so no steps get worn into any wear surfaces…

I brought a MAPA CFII along for my engine break in flights… get trained, oversee, and monitor engine for any surprises…

First flights with a new engine can result in a wide variety of un-normal things…

Who wants to go it alone?

With the NA IO550 we traveled along the Jersey shore at 1k’ agl for highest MP, changed rpm at every major way point on the ground… major rivers that cross NJ… equated to every 15 minutes or so…

It was an interesting way of not forgetting to keep track of time… :)

Collect JPI data… review after the flight… looking for step changes in CHT… as break in occurs…

Oddly, with a factory engine… it has a few hours on it before it gets shipped out… it may be mostly broken in already… the step changes may not be  visible… because they happened already…

PP thoughts only, not a mechanic…

Best regards,

-a-

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  • 4 weeks later...

I've done numerous engine break-ins.  I follow the Lycoming Directions contained in the attached Service Instructions.  I've also attached an example Spreadsheet I use and fill out during the flight.  It certainly helps to have an autopilot during the break-in.

 

Engine Breakin N9148W 1.xlsx

Lycoming Reciprocating engine Break-In and Oil Consumption.pdf

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8 hours ago, donkaye said:

I've done numerous engine break-ins.  I follow the Lycoming Directions contained in the attached Service Instructions.  I've also attached an example Spreadsheet I use and fill out during the flight.  It certainly helps to have an autopilot during the break-in.

 

Lycoming SI1427B.pdf 48.12 kB · 7 downloads Engine Breakin N9148W 1.xlsx 40.73 kB · 10 downloads

Hugely helpful as always Don, mine is coming up downloaded both!

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Fired up yesterday.  All good except we had 200rpm drop on both mags.  10rpm difference though.  Seems strange.  Going to recheck after addressing a few things but does anyone know have insight to this?  brand new mags... im thinking the different prop or too rich...  af course I'll let the boys in the shop dig into it but I always like to educate myself...

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18 hours ago, donkaye said:

I've done numerous engine break-ins.  I follow the Lycoming Directions contained in the attached Service Instructions.  I've also attached an example Spreadsheet I use and fill out during the flight.  It certainly helps to have an autopilot during the break-in.

 

Lycoming SI1427B.pdf 48.12 kB · 13 downloads Engine Breakin N9148W 1.xlsx 40.73 kB · 16 downloads

Thanks Don.  This is very helpful 

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21 minutes ago, BravoWhiskey said:

Fired up yesterday.  All good except we had 200rpm drop on both mags.  10rpm difference though.  Seems strange.  Going to recheck after addressing a few things but does anyone know have insight to this?  brand new mags... im thinking the different prop or too rich...  af course I'll let the boys in the shop dig into it but I always like to educate myself...

Has the timing been set up yet?

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Right behind you, Airmark shipped my engine to West Texas last week, hopefully, if all goes well we will be back up in the air to Tucson in October!

Here's a general guide for break in procedure that Airmark sent me. I prefer @donkaye tho.

 

@LANCECASPER looking forward to being back in the air.

 

IMG_20210903_051710.jpg

IMG_20210903_051710 (1).jpg

IMG_20210903_051710 (2).jpg

IMG_20210903_051710 (3).jpg

ENGINE BREAK IN PROCEDURES.pdf

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10 hours ago, LANCECASPER said:

@affricate Engine looks beautiful!

Yes! Thanks. The engine is in Junction at the moment. On to Mason soon, 

 

Didn't skimp at all: New hoses, overhaul prop, overhaul turbo, new wastegate, new starter, mags,  thoroughly examine the exhaust system, had Edison reseal my tanks in January so I think I'm good to go!

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11 hours ago, affricate said:

Right behind you, Airmark shipped my engine to West Texas last week, hopefully, if all goes well we will be back up in the air to Tucson in October!

Here's a general guide for break in procedure that Airmark sent me. I prefer @donkaye tho.

 

@LANCECASPER looking forward to being back in the air.

 

IMG_20210903_051710.jpg

IMG_20210903_051710 (1).jpg

IMG_20210903_051710 (2).jpg

IMG_20210903_051710 (3).jpg

ENGINE BREAK IN PROCEDURES.pdf 134.24 kB · 4 downloads

I’ve never seen 100K hanging from a chain before...WOW!

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We did some final adjustments today for the governor.  The 4 blade seemed to require a little finesse to dial it in.  Still got to clean up a few things from the annual ( check the gear and put the interior back in) but going for the break in run on Tuesday with a CFII.  Great having an extra set of eyes up there...

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11 hours ago, BravoWhiskey said:

We did some final adjustments today for the governor.  The 4 blade seemed to require a little finesse to dial it in.  Still got to clean up a few things from the annual ( check the gear and put the interior back in) but going for the break in run on Tuesday with a CFII.  Great having an extra set of eyes up there...

In my opinion, The guy you should take on the break in flight is the IA/A&P who hung the engine. Typically they wont know as much about aerodynamics, approaches or stalls as a CFII, but they most likely will know more about breaking in an engine, Oil pressure, and any anomalies that may occur and mitigations. Not all A&P's and CFII's are created equal, however. The guy who hung it should be confident enough in it to fly behind it.

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Just keep in mind that not all A&P's and IA's are not pilots, they are not aircraft engine operators, and some of their advice can be kind of strange. I went to a shop one time and the guy's like "yeah lean of peak operation keeps my kids in college", and I pointed at the pile of cylinders over at the corner of the shop and I was like all those Cessna 172 and 182 pilots run LOP too?

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An A&P who installs engines should be versed in break in procedures, and should be better versed in what to check and look for during maiden flights etc while the owner does the yanking and banking. A CFI or a CFII whom has never picked up a wrench might not be an appropriate person. An A&P who fixes coffee makers on 737's might not be a good choice either.

 

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