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The coolest thing about...

1) Finishing flight training in a trainer...

  • They are designed for training.
  • Simplified systems so the focus is on flying.
  • Builds a better 3D vision of aviation and flying.  
  • Provides a basis to compare to.

2) Moving on to a Mooney...

  • Selecting an entry level ship is OK.
  • Learn the usefulness of X-country flying.
  • Bigger/faster isn’t always better for your own health.
  • Get the IR, fly some distances... build experience.
  • Keep your eyes open for the next step...

3) Moving on to an ultimate Mooney.

  • Turbo Ops..?  Flying in The FLs...
  • NA 310hp high performance..?
  • Video wall instrument panel..?

There is no logical way to rush gaining experience...

It may take 10 years...

10 years from now, when you look back... you will appreciate all the experience you have picked up along the way...

If you can pick up all the experience in a faster way... that is really extra cool.

:)

Best regards,

-a-

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The most important thing is “Don’t use the door for support”. There is a handle on the frame for your left hand, and grab the door frame with your right.

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24 minutes ago, bluehighwayflyer said:

A lot of good advice here already.  I owned a J for 12 years and now own my dad’s C model that I leaned how to fly in back in the mid 80s.  

The C fits me perfectly with the pilot’s seat in the very last hole, but there is absolutely no legroom left in the rear seat behind me and I do wonder if I would still be comfortable in it if I was just an inch taller at the OP’s  height.  

I flew the J, on the other hand, with the seat in the third from the last hole and that left plenty of legroom in the seat behind me.  

At the OP’s height, unless he is all torso, I would probably rule out “short bodies” (A, B, C, D, & E models), personally, and for maximum comfort I would probably also avoid mid 70s Fs and ‘77 Js with the throttle quadrant, as it takes up valuable knee room if you are tall like we are.

With all of that in mind, I think a F or a J would be ideal for his mission.   A G would work well, too, but they can be a little useful load limited if that matters.

Flame suit on.  :)

Jim

It's worth springing for  a long body if it gives us even 1" additional room behind the seat.  It is highly likely that 95% of my anticipated missions will be 375lb in the front and a 235nm leg at the absolute maximum.  Using the first weight/balance calculator that google presented I would/could have 70 gallons of fuel including reserves, and according to Foreflight I would use 26 gallons for that leg.  I would expect to keep it at or around 55% for economy and to limit speed for the foreseeable future.  It's certainly doable, or looks so on the surface. Good stuff!

34-35" inseam by the way.  Standard tall middle aged guy.  48" coat size, tall.  I feel like I am proportional for a tall goofy looking guy.  I had plenty of headroom with the seat cranked all the way down.  Three clicks forward of aft worked well and Rick has rudder pedal extensions, so likely 4 clicks are possible.  The only hot spot was my right knee...likey a matter of moving the seat aft one click or no pedal extensions.  Rick's plane is friggin sexy!

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1 hour ago, Robert Trask said:

Rick you showed me once, and it was truly a non-issue to get in and out.  I hear about the difficulty all the time but my EXTREMELY limited but very recent experience did not reflect that.  Ya just get in or out.  I wouldnt want that situation as a UPS driver but in a aircraft...zero concern on my part. 

Very well said. Mooneys are made to travel and most of us use them as such. That means one ingress and egress per day, or at most twice with three or four hours between. I'd much rather buy a plane for the hours spend in flight rather than the minute or two loading and unloading. 

I've got a good friend with a 177 Cardinal. It's got doors the same size as the ones on my grandfather's 1972 2 door Plymouth GranFury. And no strut to get in the way. And the wing makes for great shade when hanging out at the airport. In other words, better than my Mooney in every way... until it leaves the ground.

Staggering the front seats makes it easy to sit two large guys in comfort.

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While as a new (in a few months) pilot I should not be concerned with speed, thus the concept of keeping it around 50-50% cruise, 1:18 minutes to Nashville vs 1:51 in a Cessna does make a difference...it just does. 

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Just now, Robert Trask said:

While as a new (in a few months) pilot I should not be concerned with speed

That wears off in the first 50 hours (which happens very quickly when you own the airplane) and then you'll be very comfortable with the speed and thankful for it. :D

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On 3/27/2020 at 6:50 PM, Robert Trask said:

A 206/210 would certainly work

There is a relatively new potential issue with the 210 spars, make sure to take that into account in the search.  Look for FAA-2020-0156 for more info.

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On 3/27/2020 at 10:20 AM, Junkman said:

@Robert Trask Recommendations on the “best” Mooney model for an aspiring Mooniac to earn his PPL in, or to transition to after his PPL (my recommendation) to earn his IR in? I know some of you have done it...

I went almost immediately from my checkride to my M20-C. Five weeks after, to be exact. Then I flew it for a year to figure things out, learn the plane and get comfortable moving around the country. A year from the end of my insurance dual, I flew the wife from WV to Yellowstone. Then I dithered for a hear before knuckling down and getting serious about IFR. The DPE was quite content giving the exam in my little plane.

But I imagine any Mooney, A-J, would work as well. Insurance on the bigger, faster models would likely be unkind to a new pilot, and they have more systems to learn and master, because if it's in the plane, the DPE can question you about it, make you use it or turn it off and make you fly without it. My Brittain systems weren't a problem (durn CFII made me fly with it turned off most of the time anyway!), and with no disconnect switch, we did the whole thing with the PC system running.

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On 3/27/2020 at 2:19 PM, gsxrpilot said:

Staggering the front seats makes it easy to sit two large guys in comfort.

Exactly - Robert and I talked about that, but I didn't take the opportunity to demonstrate out of an abundance of caution for social distancing and all that.

As an aside, the current situation is extremely difficult for meeting new and aspiring Mooniacs and not shaking hands. This just isn't our way in Mooniac Land. With my latest workplace guidance I had to postpone our planned intro flight tomorrow. I think I'm more bummed out than Robert.

Cheers,
Rick

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On 3/27/2020 at 10:50 AM, Robert Trask said:

I am down to an older Cirrus SR22, Mooney, or Cherokee 6xt (for the most part) as of this time.  A 206/210 would certainly work but dang they are expensive for what you get!!!  It makes little sense!

Don't forget the 33/35/36 Bonanzas. They are kind of a blend between the Cirrus/Mooney/Cherokee 6.

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Just now, KLRDMD said:

Don't forget the 33/35/36 Bonanzas. They are kind of a blend between the Cirrus/Mooney/Cherokee 6.

I've got a friend with a Bo 35 that I'm connecting Robert with for another fit check and persuading conversation. I'm rooting for a Mooney, but all options must be explored before knowing that Mooney is the best choice. LOL

Cheers,
Rick

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Just now, Junkman said:

I've got a friend with a Bo 35 that I'm connecting Robert with for another fit check and persuading conversation. I'm rooting for a Mooney, but all options must be explored before knowing that Mooney is the best choice. LOL

They are both good airplanes; they each have different strengths and weaknesses. You need to pick the one that has more of what's important to you.

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