kerry

tire pressure

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I go by what's placarded on the plane itself: 30 in the mains, 49 in the nose. I can tell when the nosewheel needs air because the plane becomes significantly more difficult to pull out of the hangar. That's the one that's doing all the work.

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I would think a lower air pressure in the main gear tires may help reduce gas tank leaks as it will reduce impact loads during landing. Mooney's don't have much suspension travel from what I've seen.

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Quote: nels

I would think a lower air pressure in the main gear tires may help reduce gas tank leaks as it will reduce impact loads during landing. Mooney's don't have much suspension travel from what I've seen.

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Quote: kellym

IMHO, an old wives tale. You use the tire pressures specified in the maintenance manual. For B-E models that will be 30psi for all three tires. For F&G models the nose tire is upped to a 6 ply and uses 49 lbs.

If you are landing hard enough to have an effect on the tanks, you need some instruction. For you to do anything to the tank, you have to make the wing spar flex. Good luck with that.

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Quote: Immelman

Regarding nose gear pressure: The older Mooneys came with 4-ply tires. The inflation spec is 30psi. Sometime in the M20F they changed over to a 6-ply nosewheel tire. The spec'd inflation went up with that change (to somewhere in the mid 40s).

So vintage mooney drivers, take a look at your nose tire: If you're running a 6 ply tire (which technically may not comply with the type certificate), you'll probably need a higher pressure to have the tire properly inflated.

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Quote: kellym

IMHO, an old wives tale. You use the tire pressures specified in the maintenance manual. For B-E models that will be 30psi for all three tires. For F&G models the nose tire is upped to a 6 ply and uses 49 lbs.

If you are landing hard enough to have an effect on the tanks, you need some instruction. For you to do anything to the tank, you have to make the wing spar flex. Good luck with that.

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With respect to 4-ply vs. 6-ply tires. Would the tire pressure increase just because most are now using a 6-ply tire? A 6-ply tire weighs more and the attitude should remain the same sitting on the ground, but I'd like a good reason for increasing the nose wheel pressure to 49 lbs. This is interesting, at least for me.

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I would stick with 30 all around. I ran 45 for a year and the center of the tire is bare and the edges have tread.

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1 hour ago, outermarker said:

With respect to 4-ply vs. 6-ply tires. Would the tire pressure increase just because most are now using a 6-ply tire? A 6-ply tire weighs more and the attitude should remain the same sitting on the ground, but I'd like a good reason for increasing the nose wheel pressure to 49 lbs. This is interesting, at least for me.

The engine is heavier, and the location of the wheel changed when the fuselage was stretched to make the F model.

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53 minutes ago, Raptor05121 said:

I would stick with 30 all around. I ran 45 for a year and the center of the tire is bare and the edges have tread.

Our Cs are supposed to have 30 psi all the way around. Look in your Owners Manual. 

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I run 30 as per the POH but curious cause I run what is recommend on the tire for everything else. Short story, old guy with an old Harley (1968) bitched that it handled bad, test ride confirmed it was like riding a slinky, bumped the psi up to what was stated on the tires and the issue went away. Personally I might switch to the tire manufacturers recommended psi and see if there is a difference

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I just ignore the operating limitations and fill mine with 100 PSI of NO2. 

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Unless I'm blind can someone tell me what page the tire pressure is listed in the '65E POH? My 1938 Luscombe POH which is only 8 pages, lists the tire pressure.

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45 minutes ago, outermarker said:

Unless I'm blind can someone tell me what page the tire pressure is listed in the '65E POH? My 1938 Luscombe POH which is only 8 pages, lists the tire pressure.

The 65 manual it is on page 30.

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After the C was finished...  You find the limitations(?) section of the POH has all the pertinent labels...

My C had Labels regarding air pressure for the tires....inside on the gear doors.

The Servicing section of the C’s most recent POH has a paragraph related to tire pressure... 30psi...

 

As far as ply(s) go... its a technical term used by tire manufacturers to indicate strength. It may not actually be a count of layers as one would expect.

When changing technical details when getting new tires... be sure to make sure they don't stick inside the airframe when retracted... Some dimensions may change when different specs change...

PP thoughts and stuff I read about on MS, not a mechanic...

Best regards,

-a-

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Thanks Ned...I'll make an appointment to get my eyes checked. I'll write it down on the back of my POH.

I have read this POH so many times and today I didn't see it when I wanted to check tire pressure. Thanks all for responding.

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10 hours ago, N201MKTurbo said:

The more pressure the easier it is to move in and out of the hangar!

you got that right!  and the older I get, the more important that is.

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