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Yep, go to a municipal airport for a hangar or even monthly tiedown and the leasee wants your name, rank, serial number, rights to your firstborn and for your insurance company to send a certificate of insurance.  Liability only is required.

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  • 1 year later...
On 1/15/2020 at 10:16 AM, Marauder said:

 


I often wondered how many Mooneys are flying around without insurance. There is no legal requirement to have it and knowing how much the premiums are rising, how many will throw caution to the wind?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

 

Before the Mooney I flew without insurence, I figured if I broke it, I was going too fix it anyway, only aircraft with a higher insurence rate than a Maule is a Husky, seems people buy an airplane and think that makes them a bush pilot.

‘However the Mooney has retracts, and I don’t care how good you are, there exists a possibility of a gear malfunction, so I’m insuring it.

‘If you insure,just don’t under insure, I saw an old guy lose his Maule that way, He broke an Oleo strut, which is not even as bad as a gear up, but the insurence company showed up and wrote him a check, and turned around and sold it for about what it was insured for. He had the airplane for a long time and never increased its insured value

‘He bought it back from the buyer, but it cost him I think about 10K, but it was fixed then.

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The pic is interesting... two thirds of the blades say it was a low power contact with the ground.... tips bending back...

The third blade looks like it got sat on...

 

The scrape marks on the ground are not typical of a slow landing....

 

Power out...  Running out of room...   gear up is one way to slow things down...

 

Would love to hear the pilot’s report of what happened...

Best regards,

-a-

 

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17 hours ago, A64Pilot said:

‘However the Mooney has retracts, and I don’t care how good you are, there exists a possibility of a gear malfunction, so I’m insuring it.

‘If you insure,just don’t under insure, I saw an old guy lose his Maule that way, He broke an Oleo strut, which is not even as bad as a gear up, but the insurence company showed up and wrote him a check, and turned around and sold it for about what it was insured for. He had the airplane for a long time and never increased its insured value

This is so true. It would be miserable to be flying and find out that you have a gear problem. You work on it for an hour or so, and then come to the realization that you're gonna have to land it gear up. Insurance makes that situation much easier to stomach. 

As long as you're not underinsured... My first Mooney, N6XM, was underinsured by the next guy, and a simple gear collapse on the taxiway, totaled the airplane.

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My first Mooney, N6XM, was underinsured by the next guy, and a simple gear collapse on the taxiway, totaled the airplane.

Please correct my math, assuming a normal relatively gentle gear collapse means:
New prop blades, overhaul: $5000 for 2 blade prop.
Overhaul the engine $25000.
Fix sheet metal belly damage and possibly gear (motor) if not pilot error: $5000.

So maybe $35,000...and if you had high time on the engine, most of it was going to be spent sooner or later. So why total the airplane?
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1 hour ago, ArtVandelay said:


Please correct my math, assuming a normal relatively gentle gear collapse means:
New prop blades, overhaul: $5000 for 2 blade prop.
Overhaul the engine $25000.
Fix sheet metal belly damage and possibly gear (motor) if not pilot error: $5000.

So maybe $35,000...and if you had high time on the engine, most of it was going to be spent sooner or later. So why total the airplane?

That's what I would have thought. But evidently the math the insurance company did, looked a little different. Supposedly it was close, and if the hull had been insured for $56K instead of $50K, it would have been repaired.

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5 hours ago, ArtVandelay said:


Please correct my math, assuming a normal relatively gentle gear collapse means:
New prop blades, overhaul: $5000 for 2 blade prop.
Overhaul the engine $25000.
Fix sheet metal belly damage and possibly gear (motor) if not pilot error: $5000.

So maybe $35,000...and if you had high time on the engine, most of it was going to be spent sooner or later. So why total the airplane?

Aaah.  This is rational economics.   Dealing with insurance companies is irrational.   They get charged full retail.   I was told last year by a MSC to raise my hull value to $70k, because the full-rate cost billed to an insurance company for engine/prop/belly repairs after a gear failure at speed or G.U. is about $50k.    If you don't carry about $70k hull value, they'll total it, write you a check and recoup some money with salvage.

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Insurance is a double edged sword...

Penalties for over insuring and under insuring...

For best results, accurate estimates of costs are best...

Don’t forget the costs of R&R...

Best regards,

-a-

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  • 2 weeks later...
That's what I would have thought. But evidently the math the insurance company did, looked a little different. Supposedly it was close, and if the hull had been insured for $56K instead of $50K, it would have been repaired.

I hadn’t heard that about your previous bird, that’s a shame to lose a nice early Mooney. Especially a sneaky fast one.
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0B6E1973-73D9-4203-B3F9-248ED67495F5.thumb.jpeg.8172dfbdf2f7cd5d236f44fe67466a58.jpegApparently not a gear up, saw this last week in Georgetown I guess somehow he/she managed to do almost as much damage as retractable guys, wonder if his chute would have helped.-A- can you tilt this pic D

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2 hours ago, Danb said:

Apparently not a gear up, saw this last week in Georgetown I guess somehow he/she managed to do almost as much damage as retractable guys, wonder if his chute would have helped.

All you gotta do is hit the ground hard . . . .

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They have the same rule we have...

one bounce is bad...

two bounces is getting worse...

Three is the charm...

 

Don’t hang around to prove you are a superior pilot...

Go around so your bad choices aren’t discoverable...   :)

 

The increasing amplitude of the oscillations should be a sign of the impending doom....

 

I’d like to thank the Cirrus community for allowing this pic... it makes the MS discussion a whole lot easier... :)

 

The third Bounce in a Cirrus often comes complete with a broken gear leg...

PP thoughts only, not a Cirrus mechanic...

Best regards,

-a-

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