triple8s

When you are taking too long with the preflight

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Just like many CFI's I know! :)
(But never myself!)


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8 minutes ago, kortopates said:

Just like many CFI's I know!

Yesterday afternoon, the local CFI and student were preflighting the 172. I removed my canopy cover, loaded luggage, pulled the plane to the fuel pump, filled both tanks (30 gallons), went into the FBO to fill my cup, sampled both tanks for water, pushed back from the pump, got in, cranked up, turned on and programmed EFB, taxiied to Hold Short, did the entire PreTakeoff checklist, backtaxied 2000', turned around and took off. They waved as I went by with the gear up.

Checked in with Approach for flight following, climbed to 8500, leveled off, set power, realized I was right at the bottom of the clouds, climbed to 10,500, set power, leaned out. Then heard the CFI checking in with Approach, who thought they also wanted flight following. CFI clarified that they were still on the ground . . . .

My C climbs pretty slowly at that altitude, it was 15 minutes from engine start to 8500. Yesterday was warm; when I played with the back pages of the Garmin box to check the headwind, it gave  DA if over 13,000'.

Why are CFIs so incredibly slow???

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Some are slow.  Some are thorough.  Some are neither.

When I was getting my helicopter the CFI, a good friend of mine, was always wanting to run through the checklist fast he had it memorized.  I told him I know I may go through the check list slow but when I a m flying a different aircraft that I do not fly often I take my time and if I burn little more fuel and an extra 0.1 on the Hobbs so be it.

I am faster with my plane and that is because I have many hours in it.  Usually about 15 minutes from opening the hangar to ready for take off.  I will drive to my destination if I am in that much of a hurry.:o:o:D

Sometimes I realize when I go too fast I do miss something.  Usually nothing critical but missed.

I have noticed some who will sit on the ramp engine running for what seems like an eternity.   To each his own.

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Yesterday afternoon, the local CFI and student were preflighting the 172. I removed my canopy cover, loaded luggage, pulled the plane to the fuel pump, filled both tanks (30 gallons), went into the FBO to fill my cup, sampled both tanks for water, pushed back from the pump, got in, cranked up, turned on and programmed EFB, taxiied to Hold Short, did the entire PreTakeoff checklist, backtaxied 2000', turned around and took off. They waved as I went by with the gear up.
Checked in with Approach for flight following, climbed to 8500, leveled off, set power, realized I was right at the bottom of the clouds, climbed to 10,500, set power, leaned out. Then heard the CFI checking in with Approach, who thought they also wanted flight following. CFI clarified that they were still on the ground . . . .
My C climbs pretty slowly at that altitude, it was 15 minutes from engine start to 8500. Yesterday was warm; when I played with the back pages of the Garmin box to check the headwind, it gave  DA if over 13,000'.
Why are CFIs so incredibly slow???

I can only say that even when I do a first time pre-flight with a new transition training client the process typically always takes multiple hours. We’re discussing the various systems as we do it and then go into the cockpit to discuss emergency procedures. It can take a half day. After that I just watch and ask a few questions if warranted. So are you sure the CFI wasn’t doing something similar? My first time 172 training pre-flights take most of an hour, depending on installed equipment.


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I've been flying 50 years and seldom fly any plane except my own which I am constantly working on myself so I know it very intimately. But haste is a very bad habit. I go into flying mode on the way to the airport - I turn off the car radio and turn my mind to an exercise of "what am I forgetting". During the walk around nothing is partially done, if I open the baggage door to get the fuel sampler I close and latch the door even though I'll be opening it again. I never leave the baggage door closed and unlatched. Everything else is treated in a similar manner. I suspect most of us need to be protected from ourselves.   

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There is no amount of time that is too much for a preflight.  I will never criticize anyone for taking more (unless they're in my way).

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There is no amount of time that is too much for a preflight.  I will never criticize anyone for taking more (unless they're in my way).
As a CFI, the basics and fundamentals must be internalized. Checklist discipline applies to the walk around.

For those of us lucky enough to fly birds we own, the walk-around is a great tool to check 1) that your plane is ready to fly, and 2) a trend indicator of wear items such as tires, brakes, new oil residue, etc.

When I teach in a rental, the walk around means something different. First, the student must adhere to the walk around checklist, just as I expect them to do in the air, aka not from memory. Also, rental birds take a beating and sometimes mx gets deferred. I am very watchful of items such as loose alternator belts, lock nuts, crack stop-holes, etc.

Just my $0.02.


Fly Safe,
Safety Forum Mod

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CFI has to work at the pace of the individual student and normally building own time too, likely paid hourly.

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Sometimes its both. Sometimes the flight isn't complex enough to warrant meeting in the terminal, sitting down at a desk and discussing the flight. But in that case you still need to go over the plan at the plane and there may be questions. 

However many times you get students who are just incredibly slow at everything and you don't really want to tell them " just be faster". Even with airwork. I've had students when asked to do stalls pull the power pull into a stall and we're done in 30 seconds. Others can literally take 10 minutes to set up that one maneuver.

-Robert

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