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At approximately 9:54 this morning the Collings Foundation B-17 crashed at Bradley International Airport (BDL), in Windsor Locks, north of Hartford, Connecticut. There were 13 people on board. Six have been taken to Hartford Hospital, three were initially listed in critical condition, two in moderate condition and one with just minor injuries. One of them is believed to be an airport worker who was injured on the ground. The remaining people involved were fatalities. According to Executive Director of the Connecticut Airport Authority Kevin Dillon, the pilots indicated to the tower that they were experiencing “some type of problem with the aircraft” approximately five minutes after takeoff from BDL. Dillon said the aircraft was observed to not be gaining altitude. It returned to the airport where it lost control on touchdown and struck the airport deicing facility at 9:54 a.m. local time. At least one person is believed to have been present at the facility at the time of the accident. The airport is expected to reopen one runway at 1:30 p.m. The accident runway will remain closed. The NTSB has launched a Go Team led by Board Member Jennifer Homendy to investigate the accident.

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Very sad to see and thoughts for all involved.

I took an opportunity to fly on Colling's B-24 a few years ago, which was a very worthwhile experience.   One of the reasons I did it was that there are only a small number of these sorts of things flying and I thought it probably won't be too long until these opportunities just don't exist any more.   We've lost a few B-17s in the last several years and there's not that many to go around.

Not a good day, but glad it wasn't worse.

 

Edited by EricJ

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Happier times, John Payne is a long time neighbor and friend. He took some wonderful pictures of the B17 when she visited HKY a few years ago. 

 

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These WW II warbirds are very rare and old treasures. No spare parts, and few qualified craftsmen or pilots. It's time, IMO, to let them rest in museums.

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34 minutes ago, fantom said:

These WW II warbirds are very rare and old treasures. No spare parts, and few qualified craftsmen or pilots. It's time, IMO, to let them rest in museums.

I think it might be this forum with a member with a .sig quote something to the effect of, "An airplane is safe in the hangar, but that is not what airplanes are for."

That pretty much sums up my feeling on it.

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These warbirds in a museum is no better than pictures of them in a book in my opinion. They should keep flying as long as there are any left to fly. Someday they will all be gone and then we'll have the pictures, videos, and memories. For now, keep them flying.

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Next thing you know folks will trying to consign our vintage Mooneys to some dusty museum... and their old pilots with them, I guess. 

(My grandson was thrilled to fly on the Ford Tri-Motor at KOSH. I could not get him interested in a tour of the war bird area.)

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18 hours ago, Bob_Belville said:

Next thing you know folks will trying to consign our vintage Mooneys to some dusty museum... and their old pilots with them, I guess. 

 

Excellent point.... :)

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It is sad.  I've climbed through that B-17G, the Nine-O-Nine a few times.  My grandfather who died in the 1970's flew B-17's in WWII.

I understand both sides of the argument to allow these types of vintage aircraft to fly vs putting them in a museum.

-Seth

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There are already a bunch in museums. We need to keep some of them flying. 

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3 hours ago, Andy95W said:

.....We need to keep some of them flying. 

WHY?....

The B-17 that crashed was over 70 years old, as were the pilots, both of whom perished. One, 75, reportedly had over 7,000 B-17 flying hours. Without the, 8th Air Force, the Flying Fortress, and the over 50,000 American airmen that died over the skies of Europe, the world might very well be a much different place. The few surviving warrior Forts deserve a better fate.

"Today, a total of only 39 surviving B-17 bombers are located in the United States, plus several in other countries. Several B-17 planes are still airworthy today, including "Memphis Belle", "Sentimental Journey", "Nine O Nine" and "Aluminum Overcast". More aircraft are undergoing restoration or are in storage."

At some point, neither planes nor pilots can make up with experience, what the ravages of old age have diminished. None O Nine couldn't convey that point, although she had crashed at least one other time. Smart and ego-less old pilots should, IMO.

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/total hijack=ON

speaking of aviation museums, If you ever get the chance, make sure you go visit the Glenn H. Curtiss aviation museum in Hammondsport, NY. Here you will learn about what really happened in our aviation history, not just the WB version of things.

https://glennhcurtissmuseum.org/

/total hijack=off oh wait...I started this tread, it is hard to hijack from yourself I guess

 

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If anyone could hijack themselves it’d be you Mr Mike 

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1 hour ago, mike_elliott said:

/total hijack=ON

speaking of aviation museums, If you ever get the chance, make sure you go visit the Glenn H. Curtiss aviation museum in Hammondsport, NY. Here you will learn about what really happened in our aviation history, not just the WB version of things.

https://glennhcurtissmuseum.org/

/total hijack=off oh wait...I started this tread, it is hard to hijack from yourself I guess

 

What is the WB?  Are you referring to the Writers' War Board?

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6 minutes ago, Shadrach said:

What is the WB?  Are you referring to the Writers' War Board?

Wright Brothers.  They actively were in conflict with Glen Curtiss during the early days of aviation, and while Curtiss eventually won in terms of business, the WB's came out ahead in terms of writing the history.

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On 10/3/2019 at 5:17 PM, Bob_Belville said:

Next thing you know folks will trying to consign our vintage Mooneys to some dusty museum... and their old pilots with them, I guess. 

(My grandson was thrilled to fly on the Ford Tri-Motor at KOSH. I could not get him interested in a tour of the war bird area.)

Reminds me of a new George Strait song.  For you country music fans you should download the album.  He has one song called Old Violin.  He basically is saying he is feeling like an old violin soon to be put away and never played again.  Are our old birds and our pilots are they going "to be put away and never played again", drones to rule the sky's (I think not for a long long time)

Edited by wcb

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So we put amything old in a museum, thats fine, lets start with Vintage guns, vintage cars, vintage bikes, the list goes on, what is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander ne c'est pas?

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I’ve flown J3 cubs older than that B17. Should they be grounded too?

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16 hours ago, N201MKTurbo said:

Like all accident, let’s wait till the facts come out. The NTSB is amazing.

It's a shame that our politicians prefer to act Right Now, fueled on emotions, rather than waiting for facts.

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19 hours ago, 201er said:

I’ve flown J3 cubs older than that B17. Should they be grounded too?

J3 Cub complexity (like a 50 year old Mooney) is just a bit less than a WW II B-17, you're not 75 years old like the B-17 pilot was, and you weren't carrying paying passengers. The Fortress was a handful, even when new, and in the hands of a couple of 21 year old AAF pilots.

Not at all, 'ne c'est pas', and taking this dissuasion to ridiculous extremes is silly, but very popular these days.

I'm far from surprised that my opinion isn't popular among a number of old pelicans ;) Yes, I'm one also. 

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If you’ve seen the inside of one of these things (and I’ve flown on the accident airplane twice) they are not much more complex than a J-3 or or even the Super Cub which I’ve flown as PIC. It is a very basic aircraft, cranked out by the tens of thousands in wartime.

We’d be safer under our beds but I’m not staying there.

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On 10/5/2019 at 12:40 PM, wcb said:

Reminds me of a new George Strait song.  For you country music fans you should download the album.  He has one song called Old Violin.  He basically is saying he is feeling like an old violin soon to be put away and never played again.  Are our old birds and our pilots are they going "to be put away and never played again", drones to rule the sky's (I think not for a long long time)

George's sound is good but you need to listen to Johnny Paycheck for the better earlier version.:):D

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