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IO-360-A3B6 Jet-A Contamination 1.86%

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Will fill in the rest of the story later, but it appears we have at least 1.86% Jet-A in our fuel after a lab report.  Anyone know if that's enough to get a whole new engine for Christmas? 

We have an insurance claim open and FBOs where it has been fueled are involved, but not sure what they are going to say yet.  Will call Lycoming in the morning.

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I was involved in a jet A contamination arround 1997 or so from Chevron .Got a letter and phone call stating I had fueled helicopter with known bad batch of fuel .They found out about it from a south bound plane destroying its engine from detonation shortly after fueling at KSAC.So they tracked down every one who had purchased fuel and sent guys over to defuel ...I later read it was about 18% jet a...than Insurence people from chevron wanted to see logs for any flights post fueling.I had done 2 about an hour each.Chevron paid for engine and tranny overhaul due to common oil supply.

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Base,

fill us in with as many details to your story to get the best ideas from the MS community...

Calling AOPA can get you up to speed with options...

Wondering if Lycoming has numbers for amount of jet fuel decontamination can be endured...

Drain, flush, repeat... do not fly...

 

Good luck and best regards,

-a-

 

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Less than 2% is pretty low. Was the engine run with it? Fuel systems can be cleaned and flushed out if there is no engine damage but I'll be curious to hear what Lycoming recommends. They'll  probably be pretty severe in their recommendations if there is any risk.

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Lycoming wants a tear down and inspection then overhaul if needed.  Insurance is paying for the fuel testing and inspection/tear down.  If it requires an overhaul they will also cover any work there as well--good thing I just got 4 new cylinders.  

Socal based: Between Corona, "Tim's in Long Beach" who would you prefer to do the work?

 

 

 

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I would pay for the difference in shipping to Lycon if that is the only hold up. 

-Matt

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A long time ago, here in Kerrville, a fuel guy put 100 low lead into a kerosene burner.,

Plane had a mixture of both JetA and 100ll

I watched the guy sit there for 3-4 hours, letting both engines run at 30% power 

He said it was safe for the engines?!

Not my plane.

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Every engine design has its limitations...

Jet fuel in piston planes causes preignition that can lead to melted pistons within minutes.

100LL in a jet engine would be different...

In this case... See what the engine manufacturer says to do...

Not sure what the advantage of running all the mixed fuel through the jet engine does...  unless that was clean fuel and the idea was to flush it for hours...?

Jet engines may be more tolerant to mixed fuel... the 100LL has a much lower energy content per gallon... that would cause a different set of challenges...

PP thoughts only, no Jet A experience yet...

Best regards,

-a-

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11 hours ago, Mcstealth said:

A long time ago, here in Kerrville, a fuel guy put 100 low lead into a kerosene burner.,

Plane had a mixture of both JetA and 100ll

I watched the guy sit there for 3-4 hours, letting both engines run at 30% power 

He said it was safe for the engines?!

 

Many gas turbine engines specifically allow the use of 100LL and/or unleaded gasoline. In fact the P2V had both piston engines and jet engines, all of which ran on Avgas. 

Our EC135 helicopter has Turbomeca Arrius 2B1 engines. They allow a good number of hours using 100LL avgas without restrictions or overhaul requirements. 

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Just a thought: 

 

If your engine is going to be apart for inspection, then re-assembled, but not overhauled. Consider renewing various wear items such as cam and lifters. (assuming you have a flat tappet cam) Main and Rod bearings, rod bolts and so on. Many disassembly-inspections go back together without replacement of those wear items. Sometimes they don't even remove the rods from the crank. 

Done correctly, you should have an engine that will go another 2000 hours from the "inspection". It may not increase the value like a true overhaul would, but it will have some value, especially to you. 

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2 hours ago, cujet said:

Many gas turbine engines specifically allow the use of 100LL and/or unleaded gasoline. In fact the P2V had both piston engines and jet engines, all of which ran on Avgas. 

Our EC135 helicopter has Turbomeca Arrius 2B1 engines. They allow a good number of hours using 100LL avgas without restrictions or overhaul requirements. 

The P/W PT-6 I fly allows up to 10 hours of flight with Avgas. Temps run hotter so you have to keep an eye on that.

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PT6A-35 permits up to 150 hours of operation on 100LL.  

The IO-360 is not as happy on 100% JetA, however.  

Chevron had a 100LL contamination issue in N California about 24 years ago.  The end result was a lot of new engines installed at Chevron expense.  Including the one in my C. 

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