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20 hours ago, M20Doc said:

Ask yourself how motivated you would be to work for the typical wage of a maintainer in an Aircraft repair shop.  It’s part of the problem our industry has faced for generations.

Clarence

A senior mechanic at the car dealership makes quite a bit more.

-Robert

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5 hours ago, RobertGary1 said:

I remember remarking to one of the mechanics at a MSC as he worked on my plane "Do a good job because I fly my family over the Sea of Cortez in Mexico" and he looked back at me with shock on his face.

-Robert

Yes, he might have been shocked by that possibility.  There's also the possibility you misunderstood the reason behind the look..  He might have been thinking, "Of course I'm doing a good job, I'm a professional who's proud of his work.  I can't believe this guy is calling me a shitty mechanic.  Maybe I'll come to your place of business and call you a shitty lawyer/doctor/whatever."  That would explain a shocked look on his face, too.

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Believe it or not, living in Austin, my Mooney hasn't crossed any warm water of any significance. It has, however, been over the water on all five of the Great Lakes. Some were pretty short hops, but we have actually crossed Superior and Michigan.

We're looking forward to flying over warm water in the Caribbean one day soon.

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On 7/8/2018 at 1:44 PM, moontownMooney said:

Hello All -

We are working through our annual at a reputable MSC and have received our recommended repairs list.  Things have gone quite smoothly from a major repair perspective; however, there are quite a few $300-$1000 items being recommended, which also add up.  It includes some items I'd like to get some more experienced opinions on, as they have given us a bit of concern.  We have a 1968 M20F.  This is our first annual after ownership of the aircraft, but we had an annual completed by an MSC as part of the pre-buy process a year ago.

1) We have an Aero Trainer tire on the nose gear and the mechanic suggests that these are such poor quality that they are inherently a blowout risk and is recommending replacing. He did not indicate which brand/model of tire and tube he was going to replace with. In my opinion a high quality tube is more important than tire brand.  GA aircraft rarely fail.  Inexpensive economy quality tires can sometimes be a challenge to balance.  His opinion seems laced with hyperbole.   I just blew a tube away from home. the tire was fine, the tube had 3 small holes on the side. Tube was Michelin airstop with about 300hrs and 5 years under it's belt....

2) He is suggesting performance of SB-289A related to aileron links, but when I look up 289A it clearly indicates that it applies to electric gear retract versions of the 66-onward M20F's but we have manual gear retract and the applicable Modal & S/N list says nothing of that.  I'm inclined to think we don't need this, per the SB's applicability list, but perhaps this has become a common repair/upgrade for the manual retracts as well and it.simply hasn't been reflected in the print of the SB? Not applicable. Waste of time and effort. I would question him about this recommendation on a Jbar retraction system.

3) He is suggesting that the tail linkage (link, bolts, bushing, duct) needs replaced.  He indicated that it appears original.  He made a comment that this is the/a source of slop in the tail.  I'm a little suspicious that he is commenting just based on the linkage appearing "original" and not on actual slop demonstrated in our plane because our pre-buy/annual mechanic (performed at a different, reputable MSC) specifically commented on how tight (i.e., little slop) the tail was relative to most Mooney's of our vintage.  With that said, this is a pretty important part of the plane and I don't want to ignore sound advice on the matter.  All Mooneys have some free play in the tail.  Ask him for the specs  and measurements. It's either in spec or it isn't

3) He is suggesting installation of the Lasar over sized bushing and NAS bolt kit for slop in our nose gear.  Our pre-buy/annual indicated slop in the nose gear as well (they added shims) so this one seems to follow history to me and I don't have any big concerns, but curious if anyone has any thoughts.  This mod will eliminate for and aft slop nose gear.  If you have said slop, it's imprudent not to address it.

5) He is also suggesting the left nose gear door rod ends.  This isn't that costly, but I'm also not sure what indication compels it, or what the potential complication or failure mode would be if left unaddressed. If the rod ends get too sloppy, they can interact with the tire during extension.  I adjusted my nose gear doors up super tight against the airframe one year. during the gear swing the parting edge of the left gear door caught in the water channel of the tire preventing the gear from being lowered. Any changes made to the tires, gear or gear doors should be carefully and thoroughly verified before flying the aircraft.

My partner and I were encouraged with finding a reasonably convenient MSC that folks recommended, but some aspects of our experience have turned us off a bit.  Communication has been less than desirable and the annual is going to stretch past 3 weeks despite no major repairs (does include 500 hr mag inspection).  I'm willing to accept these issues (return next year) if the inspection is thorough and accurate and the repairs are quality.  However a few of the recommendations (the first three listed above) are giving us some added concern.  I'd find  another set of eyes for next year.  You can always come back a few years later.   

Thanks in advance for any thoughts/opinions/recommendations...

For me communication is the most important part of the equation.  The fastest way to turn me off is to perform an unauthorized repair or to blow through previously discussed time-lines with no communication.  You'll find a shop that works well for you. Even then, consider having a fresh set of eyes laid on the plane every few years.

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10 hours ago, gsxrpilot said:

We're looking forward to flying over warm water in the Caribbean one day soon.

If you need/want a wingman on this trip and a 231 won't make your 252 look too bad, just say the word, I'm your huckleberry!

 

Ron

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21 minutes ago, Marcopolo said:

If you need/want a wingman on this trip and a 231 won't make your 252 look too bad, just say the word, I'm your huckleberry!

 

Ron

Sounds like a plan!

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11 hours ago, gsxrpilot said:

We're looking forward to flying over warm water in the Caribbean one day soon.

My engine runs rough every time I do that.  Must be the extra humidity.

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I've crossed Lake Michigan more times than I can count, once at 4K feet.  I still feel a bit guilty about that, it was suggested to me by my pilot-rated passenger and was a good workaround the weather.  That said, I don't really think he understood the ramifications of ditching in Lake Michigan.

The one good thing about the Mooney is if I fly high I don't think I'm beyond gliding distance form the shore for more than a few minutes, meaning I'm within swimming distance of shore nearly the whole time.

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On 7/13/2018 at 8:55 AM, jlunseth said:

My engine runs rough every time I do that.  Must be the extra humidity.

I think that is called out in the POH  - it's called "Auto-Rough"   My Plane has the does the same, additionally my noise cancellers start picking up weird noises as well!

 ;)

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On 7/13/2018 at 8:55 AM, jlunseth said:

My engine runs rough every time I do that.  Must be the extra humidity.

When Palm Beach vectored me over the Everglades at 4000 msl enroute to KFXE, I started hearing really weird, soft noises, intermittent and variable. Wondered what my engine had swallowed, or if something outside was suddenly flapping in the windstream. Turned out I had tuned COM2 to catch ATIS but was too far out; I usually turn it off on the Intercom, but had just read that some people turn the volume down until it breaks squelch . . . Problem solved! Great relief! Now I have resumed pressing the button on the Intercom, it's easier than twisting the little bitty volume knob and doesn't cause confusion or impending panic . . . .

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