smlynarczyk

Cost for a factory new IO-360 for a J

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, dr_caligari said:

Hi,

i was in a similar situation two year ago. I went with the factory remanufactured engine that has two seperate magnetos and is the only option (apart from new engine) that comes with a Zero time engine and brand new log book. Those engines are finished on the same assembly line as the factory new engines. You also getting all new hardware :) See pics below.

 An overhauled engine is not a zero time engine. 

Tim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The factory overhaul has time continuing while the factory remain has zero time. They are built from the same parts on the same assembly line. The principal differences are a 2 year warranty, zero hours in the logbook since new, and another $5,500 in price for those features. But you can screw the dataplate for each engine to the other and call as such.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*Members that donate $10 or more do not see advertisements*

On 6/13/2018 at 4:37 PM, smlynarczyk said:

I am looking at a J with an engine approaching TBO and would consider buying the plane but need some cost estimates because I would opt to have an engine swap upon purchase.  I checked out the 2015 posting here on MS by (DHC)  and it seems like a pretty big ordeal (oil lines, hoses, prop governor, ...). Any insights into the  cost for going with the factory IO-360-A3B6? Also, a shop recommendation for that price? Any other considerations? Thx.

Buy the plane. Land it heavlily and strike the prop. Then go to Lycoming and get a new factory rebuild.  That way you get the insurance to pay approx 12k of the cost.  You get new vacuum, mags overhauled, csu overhauld, new prop,  new spinner and install costs under the insurance.  You only have to pay the difference between the new engine and what the insurance would pay for a teardown.  So new emgine is approx 35k uk pounds (1.35 is the exchange rate), less insruance payout....

totally illegal.   ;)  

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2018 at 12:22 PM, carusoam said:

Wholly cow...   Mostly cow... but, not 100% cow...

Holy cow...  a religious idol?

According to Harry Carray’s (italian steak house) in Chicago.... See pic below the blue spots are actually holes in the cow...

hole-y cow?...

 

When measured In AMUs.... that’s a lot of cow

 

 

3CE3A9FC-844E-41DF-B81E-E51A99BA1B07.jpeg

 

Relearning how to spell the MS way... :)

Best regards,

-a-

At least it wasn’t a picture of a morbidly obese woman!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, jetdriven said:

The factory overhaul has time continuing while the factory remain has zero time. They are built from the same parts on the same assembly line. The principal differences are a 2 year warranty, zero hours in the logbook since new, and another $5,500 in price for those features. But you can screw the dataplate for each engine to the other and call as such.  

I buy the argument that a rebuilt engine has an advantage that some or all major components have come out of engines that survived a previous engine.  As such, intuitively, they would be less prone to "infant mortality" failures from manufacturing.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jetdriven said:

The factory overhaul has time continuing while the factory remain has zero time. They are built from the same parts on the same assembly line. The principal differences are a 2 year warranty, zero hours in the logbook since new, and another $5,500 in price for those features. But you can screw the dataplate for each engine to the other and call as such.  

In actual fact anytime I’ve been ready to put a deposit down on an overhaul the reseller has always called me to tell me lycoming is offering me a rebuilt at the same price. So I’ve not had to pay the difference. 

The only bad deal is factory new That SOB lost a rod at 1050hrs  I’ll never pay for factory new again  Reman is just as good 

-Robert 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jetdriven said:

The factory overhaul has time continuing while the factory remain has zero time. They are built from the same parts on the same assembly line. The principal differences are a 2 year warranty, zero hours in the logbook since new, and another $5,500 in price for those features. But you can screw the dataplate for each engine to the other and call as such.  

This has been widely discussed before, but I've always found Mike Busch's description of reman engines interesting:

Now, when TCM or Lycoming builds up a factory rebuilt engine (colloquially but incorrectly referred to as a "factory reman"), it pulls some "anonymous" case halves from one pile, an "anonymous" crankshaft from another pile, and so forth. When the engine is completely assembled, it gets a new data plate, a new serial number, and a new logbook.

The logbook starts out at zero time-in-service. Why zero? Because there's no other reasonable figure to put in the logbook. The case halves are certainly not zero-time, but there's no record of how much time they've accrued. The crankshaft may not be new, but there's no record of how much time is on the crank, either. And so on.

In short, the "zero-time" logbook that comes with a factory rebuilt engine in no way implies that the engine is "newer" or "better" than a field overhaul. All it implies is that the reused components in the engine are of unknown heritage...nobody knows how long they were in service prior to the time then were cleaned up, inspected, and reused in your engine!

https://www.avweb.com/news/maint/182849-1.html

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now