Browncbr1

durable rattle can paint for leading edge touch up

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flying through rain has my wing looking like it could be mistaken for TKS from afar... well, not quite, but it's getting bare.. 

Does anyone have a recommendation for rattle can touch up that is more durable that the average rustoleum or krylon cans?

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This stuff sticks pretty well to clean aluminum.  And folks will think you have deice boots. 3F4B2FA8-3463-4C46-895E-6C08B3E33ACB.thumb.jpeg.69cebf47996ae9e32199d9218fa469f1.jpeg

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While clearly not a fan of spray paint in a can, in our manufacturing part of my dealership we routinely need to touch up modifications on new or nearly new equipment.  Our manufactured product  (3 to 8 axle log trailer, log racks for chassis's, hitch and plate assy's, lift axles and other frame attached products and related brackets) is all painted with automotive quality paints (not industrial grade).  If it's a standard color (black, white, or other) we stock a high quality "Lawson Products" high solids paint.  Customers find it hard to find the area we've modified once painted with this product.  The other option is with special paint colors we either have a "profit" done (a special scanning machine to give the automotive paint store a code to exactly match the color, even if faded) and have them mix a batch (pint or smaller) or we are supplied with some left over paint from the painter.  Since most paints we are using are two part epoxy, the left over must be stored in the freezer to stop (well, slow) the curing process.  The paint will generally last 3-5 days before being rendered "unusable".  We then apply with a small brush or a small spray gun, depending on the size of the repair.

Tom

 

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flying through rain has my wing looking like it could be mistaken for TKS from afar... well, not quite, but it's getting bare.. 
Does anyone have a recommendation for rattle can touch up that is more durable that the average rustoleum or krylon cans?


201er has some sort of black paint or tape on his leading edge. Interestingly, the area behind this black edge material, the paint is peeling.

Your easiest solution is see if you can have the leading edge repainted. A good paint shop can blend it in pretty well.


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3 hours ago, Browncbr1 said:

flying through rain has my wing looking like it could be mistaken for TKS from afar... well, not quite, but it's getting bare.. 

Does anyone have a recommendation for rattle can touch up that is more durable that the average rustoleum or krylon cans?

You got that on your wing flying through rain??  I mean, my prop leading edge got de-painted flying through rain, but it's going 700 mph.  Is this a common problem?

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We've done touch-up work on our airplane using rattle cans mixed by the local Sherwin Williams automotive paint store.  Couldn't even tell you exactly what the makeup of the stuff in the cans is, just that we asked for "color-matched automotive touch-up paint", and gave them an inspection plate to scan as a color reference.  What we got back was 3 cans of self-etching primer, 3 cans of base color, and 3 cans of accent color.  I think the total cost was somewhere between $100 and $200, don't recall the details.

Never painted a leading edge with it, but we've painted landing gear components, the place where the ADF antenna was removed, and an empennage trim fairing to replace the one that departed in flight.  Have used the same cans for different repairs spanning 5+ years (I know, I was pretty surprised the paint was still good the last time I checked).  It's all holding up well, and looks decent enough on an airplane which was never a beauty queen to start with.

For durability, I think the application is as important as the product itself.  Careful prep work to ensure you're not painting over the top of old paint that's still flaking off.  Several thin coats of primer and color rather than fewer thick coats.  And perhaps most important, plenty of time to cure before exposing the new paint to the elements.  Ideally you bake the parts during initial curing.  Doesn't have to be done in an oven, you can use a heat lamp or even just a hot hangar in the middle of summer.  In our case, it always worked out that there was at least a full week between paint application and the first flight.  The longer you can wait, the better.

I'm not saying you can realize undetectable touch-ups on your $20K paint job with rattle cans from the local auto paint store.  But for those of us flying workhorse airplanes with marginal exterior cosmetics, it's a fine compromise.

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I didn't use a rattle can but went with the tried and true Nason Polyurthene and it looks great!  I taped and sprayed all my leading edge surfaces with about a 3" cut back.  Holding up very well.

 

 

Rick

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5 minutes ago, hypertech said:

These guys sell small quantities of paint and touch up kits.  A little practice with a detail sprayer and you can get really good results.

 

http://www.aerotouchups.com/index.html

$35 for 2 ounces of Acry-glo is a lot of money considering Its acrylic enamel which isn’t really as good as urethane.    And they offer a range of colors the one thing is certain it will not match your airplane .  You can get a can of most of these colors a half a pint of Nason mixed up for about 30 bucks and activator is also 30 bucks but you’re in 60 bucks and you have a half pint of brushable paint Or if you thin it you have a 12oz.  In a HVLP gun that will paint a whole elevator top and bottom with two coats. 

Edited by jetdriven

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Thank you everyone for the comments.   I agree that the application method is as important as the paint itself.   I’m not looking for perfect match.  Just close enough and functional for protecting bare metal.   I’m just going to dress my prop with oil after each flight rather than worry about that prop paint.  Sounds like epoxy may be the most durable.  I’ll take an inspection plate to an automotive paint shop and see what they have on the shelf.   Will look for sherwin Williams auto and nason..  thanks all!

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A lot of paint in spray cans is billed as “epoxy” but unless it’s 2-part, it’s not epoxy. There is one kind which comes in an off-white I have used. It’s 30$ a can and it has a button on the bottom you push to release the activator. That’s real epoxy primer and it’s on my engine mount for 5 years now. 

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6 minutes ago, jetdriven said:

A lot of paint in spray cans is billed as “epoxy” but unless it’s 2-part, it’s not epoxy. There is one kind which comes in an off-white I have used. It’s 30$ a can and it has a button on the bottom you push to release the activator. That’s real epoxy primer and it’s on my engine mount for 5 years now. 

Byron, Do you recall the brand of the 2 part spray can?  Seems like a good concept when you don’t feel like all the prep And clean up of normal two part painting.

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