N252MK

Bravo checklist

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Greetings:

I will be picking up a 1997 Bravo to replace my 252 in a few weeks. Other than the checklist in the POH I'm looking to see if any of you out there have developed a checklist that you find very handy and useful to use. If you don't mind sharing it please let me know how to get a copy.

Henry H N355RZ@KPAE

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Get in it and fly it, you won't have are problems,they are great. Just don't over temp it that the big issue,and don't shock cool it. How fast you want to go depends on how much fuel you want to pay for. It's a wonderful airplane! Take good care of it, and don't mistreat it & it will take care of you. POH is pretty straight forward other than what it says about lean of peak. 

Don is the expert on Bravo

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Read up on the Bravo's exhaust system to be most knowledgeable about your plane...

1) be aware of thinned exhaust walls...

2) be familiar with the non-re torquing of exhaust clamps...

Important Notes for the new Bravo owner, not a big deal otherwise...

Best regards,

-a-

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2 hours ago, Jetlag said:

I made this checklist for normal procedures a couples years ago.

 

Best regards,

Andy

M20M CHECKLIST.docx

Nice and clean. Thanks!

It works for almost all of us. 

I'd recommend a fuel/tank/gas check during decent or landing too.

I've unported a Chorkee 6 base to final, darn FOUR tanks. I've also had a pax interference issue with a fuel valve on downwind. Fuel is a big deal! 

-Matt

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16 hours ago, N252MK said:

Greetings:

I will be picking up a 1997 Bravo to replace my 252 in a few weeks. Other than the checklist in the POH I'm looking to see if any of you out there have developed a checklist that you find very handy and useful to use. If you don't mind sharing it please let me know how to get a copy.

Henry H N355RZ@KPAE

If you're going to pick it up in San Antonio I would recommend a few hours transition time with Bob Cabe. The long body handles a little differently than your K did. 

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+1 for Mr. Cabe.  Recommended by MAPA, Mooney, AAA, Lance and Carusoam...

Bob helped me with both the TT and delivery flight of the LB Mooney.

The differences between my M20C and the M20R are pretty much night and day...  I had all the knowledge, but none of the experience....  similar to getting rusty after not flying for a while with an added loss of memory... all the Vspeeds are different...

Bob gets you up to speed on the experience part pretty quickly and enjoyably.

Expect the unexpected. We did a day of transition, then a day of delivery turned into a second day as our lunch stop got extended when an RJ over-ran the runway...stopped in the trap.

Bob took it all in stride.

Best regards,

-a-

Edited by carusoam

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On 5/16/2017 at 2:24 PM, N252MK said:

Greetings:

I will be picking up a 1997 Bravo to replace my 252 in a few weeks. Other than the checklist in the POH I'm looking to see if any of you out there have developed a checklist that you find very handy and useful to use. If you don't mind sharing it please let me know how to get a copy.

Henry H N355RZ@KPAE

Henry, do you use Foreflight? I'd be happy to email you the checklist I built in the Foreflight checklist function to use as a starting point. 

Cheers,
Rick

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Henry, do you use Foreflight? I'd be happy to email you the checklist I built in the Foreflight checklist function to use as a starting point. 
Cheers,
Rick

Rick:

I do use ForeFlight. Email is aeroncadoc@comcast.net

Thanks!

Henryp


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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5 minutes ago, N252MK said:


Rick:

I do use ForeFlight. Email is aeroncadoc@comcast.net

Thanks!

Henryp


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

On its way, let me know if it doesn't get to you.

 

Cheers,
Rick

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On 5/20/2017 at 3:31 PM, Junkman said:

Henry, do you use Foreflight? I'd be happy to email you the checklist I built in the Foreflight checklist function to use as a starting point. 

Cheers,
Rick

Can I get it also??

thanks filippo.grosoli@gmail.com

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Can I get it also??
thanks filippo.grosoli@gmail.com

On its way to you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Thanks to all who responded. My junior partner ended up going to SAT  and flew the plane back to Everett, WA with bob Cabe fulfilling his insurance checkout requirements. I got up in the plane this week and made sure i had a 9000 foot runway available so I could test out the landing differences between the M and K models.

I noticed on another thread something about running power settings by some numbers perhaps mentioned by Don Kaye. The numbers run in the 50's and one post mentioned MP + RPM as the formula.

Can someone explain this numbering system to me?

Also, we had a bunch of avionics installed when the plane was down in TX and notice that we can't get glideslope or localizer infor to read out on the Sandel from the newly installed GTN750. It will go to a local avionics shop but I'm wondering if there's a button I'm not pushing!

Henry H

N355RZ@KPAE

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Henry,

MAPA is the resource for printing power % with easy to remember numbers of MP+rpm/100.

Don Kaye is the resource of printing air speeds for final approach and landing your Mooney.

Both are great resources...

Best regards,

-a-

I forgot to include... Bob Cabe is an excellent resource as well.  He supplied me with a checklist in the most useable format for my plane. Transition Training with Bob was great. So many details specific to the O and Long Body... doing it around TX, Priceless!

Edited by carusoam

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On ‎6‎/‎9‎/‎2017 at 0:45 PM, N252MK said:

Thanks to all who responded. My junior partner ended up going to SAT  and flew the plane back to Everett, WA with bob Cabe fulfilling his insurance checkout requirements. I got up in the plane this week and made sure i had a 9000 foot runway available so I could test out the landing differences between the M and K models.

I noticed on another thread something about running power settings by some numbers perhaps mentioned by Don Kaye. The numbers run in the 50's and one post mentioned MP + RPM as the formula.

Can someone explain this numbering system to me?

Also, we had a bunch of avionics installed when the plane was down in TX and notice that we can't get glideslope or localizer infor to read out on the Sandel from the newly installed GTN750. It will go to a local avionics shop but I'm wondering if there's a button I'm not pushing!

Henry H

N355RZ@KPAE

Henry, the Sandel will most likely need a $1700 firmware upgrade to display the GS and LOC now that it is taking input from a Garmin WAAS box. I hope I am wrong, but have seen this be the case before, something the avionics guy should have caught up front. The fun just never stops...

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On ‎5‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 2:53 PM, carusoam said:

+1 for Mr. Cabe.  Recommended by MAPA, Mooney, AAA, Lance and Carusoam...

Bob helped me with both the TT and delivery flight of the LB Mooney.

The differences between my M20C and the M20R are pretty much night and day...  I had all the knowledge, but none of the experience....  similar to getting rusty after not flying for a while with an added loss of memory... all the Vspeeds are different...

Bob gets you up to speed on the experience part pretty quickly and enjoyably.

Expect the unexpected. We did a day of transition, then a day of delivery turned into a second day as our lunch stop got extended when an RJ over-ran the runway...stopped in the trap.

Bob took it all in stride.

Best regards,

-a-

+1 for Bob Cabe.  He ferried my Bravo to Texas and we did 2.5 days of transition training.  I'm interested in a Bravo checklist as well, as Bob taught me his ways, and some were different than the POH checklist.  Upon landing checklist, he told me not to turn fuel boost pump on yet I see it on the POH hand book.  Also, when flying the pattern I keep cowl flaps open the entire time.  Believe the POH said to open cowl flaps upon landing, but I normally do it on the downwind as part of the flaps checklist item. 

I need to get a new checklist as I almost stalled my Bravo on takeoff last night doing full stop landings/takeoffs.  I left the rudder trim in an almost full up position (didn't put back on takeoff setting) upon landing and didn't realize it.  Noticed it on a squirrely take off and a very high nose up attitude and fighting to keep the nose down, lower nose rudder trim, and build speed.  Luckily I felt the turbo helped, but was definitely a scary moment and emphasized the need for checklist in all phases of flight and post landing.

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4 minutes ago, daytonabch04 said:

I need to get a new checklist as I almost stalled my Bravo on takeoff last night doing full stop landings/takeoffs.  I left the rudder trim in an almost full up position (didn't put back on takeoff setting) upon landing and didn't realize it

I think you meant to say you left the elevator trim in full up position. My question is what check list are you using that doesn't have set the elevator trim to TO position prior to take off now? The POH has the checklist in it. Yes, I recommend a slight variation of the order of some of the items (IE switch to fullest tank), but not the exclusion of any of them. To rethink and to outguess the factory tests and pilots is a rather bold move I would caution against, but not saying you are considering this. Your transition training should have beat checking the trim settings into you prior to rolling onto the runway, checklist or not. Dont forget this check, just as dont forget to look to see if someone is on short final the tower forgot about. Im not trying to beat you up but want to point out simple stuff like this really goes back to primary training and is refined with your transition training to your specific Mooney. When someone has a new to him plane, a lot of the basics are easily skipped in the mass of new features functions gizmos and thingamajigs to check, along with the new performance curves to learn, but proper transition will keep you focused. I am not saying Mr. Cabe didn't cover these well, but am saying you need to stay vigilant while learning to become one with the fire breathing Bravo.

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6 minutes ago, mike_elliott said:

I think you meant to say you left the elevator trim in full up position. My question is what check list are you using that doesn't have set the elevator trim to TO position prior to take off now? The POH has the checklist in it. Yes, I recommend a slight variation of the order of some of the items (IE switch to fullest tank), but not the exclusion of any of them. To rethink and to outguess the factory tests and pilots is a rather bold move I would caution against, but not saying you are considering this. Your transition training should have beat checking the trim settings into you prior to rolling onto the runway, checklist or not. Dont forget this check, just as dont forget to look to see if someone is on short final the tower forgot about. Im not trying to beat you up but want to point out simple stuff like this really goes back to primary training and is refined with your transition training to your specific Mooney. When someone has a new to him plane, a lot of the basics are easily skipped in the mass of new features functions gizmos and thingamajigs to check, along with the new performance curves to learn, but proper transition will keep you focused. I am not saying Mr. Cabe didn't cover these well, but am saying you need to stay vigilant while learning to become one with the fire breathing Bravo.

Yes, we covered the elevator trim to TO position after landing, but was something I did not notice during post landing checks as I should have.  The transition training with Bob was great and was more memorization of checklist items short and to the point.  I did not back it up with the checklist, hence why I am looking for a checklist for myself.  A small flip checklist came with the plane at purchase, but was not a POH checklist.  I'm open to all checklist suggestions that people have.

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On the Bravos and Ovation that I’ve flown you really notice it if you got distracted and forgot rudder trim on take-off. Also landing without rudder trim in the middle will catch your attention as well.

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There are three pieces of 8.5” X 11” paper I have collected...

1) Bob’s version of the various check lists... They match my POH except where there were things to check for hardware I don’t have... i’m Still checking for my spare alt.

2) Another page was the operational checklist for speeds and altitudes around the TP at ‘key’ positions... an ode to staying ahead of the plane... Bob drew this up from memory at breakfast as if he was flying my plane over coffee... one step at a time... the focus is being ready for each step...

3) A third piece of paper added specific details that updated landing speeds based on a matrix of conditions.  Don ‘Neo’ Kaye is the author of the matrix.... (I made up the new name for DK, see his website about getting a copy of his landing technique...)

 

4) Recently, sitting through a presentation by George ‘Brain’ Perry at the Summit... I am updating my operational checklist page to include the details of the  ‘circular’ pattern...

 

Overall, I use flows, backed up with a check list...  otherwise it is a long todo list, prone to missed or delayed steps based on increased stress and distractions...

 

The Mooney is an amazing teacher.

 It rewards you with speed and efficiency when you do everything right...

...and strongly discourages you from forgetting to reset trim settings.

The only difference between the short body and the long body... about 100 excess hp, and the trims are multiple and electric powered...   

It is good to have a solid plan A for a well executed Go Around... Adding full power needs a bit of modulation until trim can be effected...

Mooneys have plenty of power to overcome a full dirty configuration... Don’t rush...

unleashing all 100+ excess hp with full flaps and full up trim requires some pretty strong arms and clear thoughts to keep the nose level while getting separated from the ground...

Don't turn a memory challenge into a real emergency.  Modulate the power input until the trim can be adjusted properly.

Bottom line... Fly the plane!   Use the yoke, then trim off the forces...

your arms, hands, feet and thumb are going to be very busy for a few moments...

 

PP thoughts only, not a CFI...

Let me know what I missed.

Best regards,

-a-

 

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Here is the checklist I use.  Fold in half (vertically) put laminate over it.  When I had a Mc Cauley prop I set the power to 28/2300.  Set the TIT not more than 1600 and the exhaust will not crack.  Good Luck!

Mooney Checklist Rev.pdf

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