bonal

Today's flight for 2017

75 posts in this topic

32 minutes ago, N6758N said:

Tom,

Funny you mention N929PG. I have done the annual on that bird a few times, it is based in Allentown, PA now (KXLL). Chris Z owns it now ( I don't think he is on MS). I've got about 5 hrs in the left seat. Was the panel redone when you owned it?

That was 15 years ago but I believe it had older King radios and a Loran.  No GPS.

I bought it from Bill Bain out of Falcon Field (Mesa, AZ) on April Fools Day 1996 with 1900 hours SMOH and got 2400 hours exactly before replacing the engine. The N number was his birthday 9/29 and PG was for papa & grandma.   Sold it and delivered it to a doctor based at Griffin GA with 800 hours on a Factory Reman in 2001 when I bought the Rocket.

I've checked many times over the years on Flight Aware and thought it ended up in South America.  

Is it still tan and brown?   

Tom

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To Portland Maine with my oldest sun - Lobster run.  We had lunch and brought home so hapless lobsters.

We ate a place that had the most amazing lobster sandwich I ever had - like a lobster roll but better - the bread was toasted and soaked in butter - and we know lobster and butter is good so no surprise there - but then avocado and bacon - wow it was amazing.


If you're south in Boston there is one place I'd recommend
- Neptune Oyster in Little Italy. Last meal kind of good. Wife and I agree on that. Warm style labsta roll. The fact that they have a great rah bah makes it even betah.

Ok no more accents...



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Sounds like home Brad,

Bob and I could join ya...

Best regahds,

-a-

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Finished up my dual time and got to fly solo in the Mooney yesterday.

http://intothesky.us/2017/01/14/last-cfi-flight-first-solo-in-the-mooney/

20170114_161838.jpg

Then today I got to go flying again this morning, this time in the right seat of @MHemperly's "E" as the safety pilot while he was shooting approaches for his IFR currency. I was glad he asked, I had a great time and learned a lot. Here's a few pictures from this morning.

20170115_081036.jpg20170115_082719.jpg20170115_085945.jpg

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@Skates97 thanks for being my eyes today! I hope I didn't suck too bad! Lol! Glad you had fun! 

Edited by MHemperly
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thanks for another fine write up...

I hope that the stories continue even though it seems our young man is all growed up now.

It just must be so neat to fly any time your wife lets you!

Edited by mpg
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Another good write up, Richard.

The next time you are fast on final, just hold the plane off in the flare, keep the nose up and stay centered on the runway. You will experience the Mooney float, just don't let the wind blow you to the side. Expect about 100' of float for every 1 mph you are fast . . . Eventually the excess speed will bleed off and you will land. So don't do this if the runway is short.

Having the wisdom to do a go around is a good thing, not something to be embarrassed by. If something isn't right, go around and try again, that's how pilots stay alive and airplanes stay undamaged.

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26 minutes ago, Hank said:

Another good write up, Richard.

The next time you are fast on final, just hold the plane off in the flare, keep the nose up and stay centered on the runway. You will experience the Mooney float, just don't let the wind blow you to the side. Expect about 100' of float for every 1 mph you are fast . . . Eventually the excess speed will bleed off and you will land. So don't do this if the runway is short.

Having the wisdom to do a go around is a good thing, not something to be embarrassed by. If something isn't right, go around and try again, that's how pilots stay alive and airplanes stay undamaged.

 

x2. I pounded the pattern yesterday when I was solo. First time I was sloppy and came in at 80mph Vref and floated well past the 1,000' mark. I dropped gear and flaps much earlier next time around, 75 over numbers and I had it down about 300' past the numbers.

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10 hours ago, bradp said:

 


If you're south in Boston there is one place I'd recommend
- Neptune Oyster in Little Italy. Last meal kind of good. Wife and I agree on that. Warm style labsta roll. The fact that they have a great rah bah makes it even betah.

Ok no more accents...



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Wicked accent Brad.

...one of my sons is a redsox fan - and I always indulge him a game at fenway every year.  Maybe I'll check out Neptune!

Edited by aviatoreb
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It's the Season to be a Pats fan!

-a-

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10 minutes ago, carusoam said:

It's the Season to be a Pats fan!

-a-

and a Packer Fan!

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3 hours ago, Hank said:

Having the wisdom to do a go around is a good thing, not something to be embarrassed by. If something isn't right, go around and try again, that's how pilots stay alive and airplanes stay undamaged.

Although a go around is rare for me, I have still done them, one within the last year (in my Mooney,  got several in the Lancair).  Hank's advice is dead on.  I have made zero opinions on the negative side when I see a pilot elect to go around.  It clearly demonstrates good decision making by the guy behind the yoke.

Tom

Edited by Yooper Rocketman
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12 hours ago, Yooper Rocketman said:

That was 15 years ago but I believe it had older King radios and a Loran.  No GPS.

I bought it from Bill Bain out of Falcon Field (Mesa, AZ) on April Fools Day 1996 with 1900 hours SMOH and got 2400 hours exactly before replacing the engine. The N number was his birthday 9/29 and PG was for papa & grandma.   Sold it and delivered it to a doctor based at Griffin GA with 800 hours on a Factory Reman in 2001 when I bought the Rocket.

I've checked many times over the years on Flight Aware and thought it ended up in South America.  

Is it still tan and brown?   

Tom

It was painted about 5ish years ago to look like an Ovation, red and black stripes. Someone did the whole panel over to include a 530W, Stec 60-2 and one of the older style digital engine monitors. I was always curious about the panel, it looked like someone had overlayed on top of the original structure which made it stick into your face. Wasn't my favorite to fly due to that. I do not think I have any pictures unfortunately. 

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4 hours ago, Hank said:

Another good write up, Richard.

The next time you are fast on final, just hold the plane off in the flare, keep the nose up and stay centered on the runway. You will experience the Mooney float, just don't let the wind blow you to the side. Expect about 100' of float for every 1 mph you are fast . . . Eventually the excess speed will bleed off and you will land. So don't do this if the runway is short.

Having the wisdom to do a go around is a good thing, not something to be embarrassed by. If something isn't right, go around and try again, that's how pilots stay alive and airplanes stay undamaged.

 

1 hour ago, Yooper Rocketman said:

Although a go around is rare for me, I have still done them, one within the last year (in my Mooney,  got several in the Lancair).  Hank's advice is dead on.  I have made zero opinions on the negative side when I see a pilot elect to go around.  It clearly demonstrates good decision making by the guy behind the yoke.

Tom

Thanks guys. Hank, in looking back on it while driving home I saw that if I would have just held it off in the float I would have been fine. The problem was I tried to let it touch down at the higher speed. The going around wasn't that I was embarrassed, it was more annoyed at myself for not being set up right. I was pleased with the go around and working through cleaning up the plane quickly. There was only one other go around that we did in my transition training and that was when I was coming in high and fast and made the decision early while still on short final. Making the decision and executing after a couple bounces was different that that, but I was happy with the way that I handled it.

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Hey Richard,

Nice write up as usual. And well done on the go around. There are two useful skills to practice when you happen to botch an approach and come in way too fast.  I'll mention here that when the Mooney Caravan flies (and we hope you'll join us on a flight to Oshkosh soon), we fly our approach at 90 knots and no flaps. And yet we all land just fine. All that's required is enough runway. 

So when you find yourself coming in hot, use the event to practice either 1) a go around, as you did or 2) landing by holding the plane in ground effect until it just can't fly any longer and rolls on. The key is with power off, hold the plane off the runway as long as possible.

Both are good skills to have. And of course, the available runway might determine your choice of 1 or 2.

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Richard

i absolutely love reading your write ups, they capture the magic perfectly. That second bounce I could picture in my mind and yes I ALWAYS go around when I get to the second.  It's good practice at go arounds if nothing else. 

Nothing beats the feeling of going out to your own plane does it? No CFIs to ask questions, forms to fill in etc, just you and your own decision making process.  It's craque. 

Please keep posting even though as other have said you are not in short pants any more and are at Middle School. :). (No one ever gets a degree,  Bob Hoover perhaps came close to graduating. :) ).  We all just keep learning

Andrew

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29 minutes ago, gsxrpilot said:

Hey Richard,

Nice write up as usual. And well done on the go around. There are two useful skills to practice when you happen to botch an approach and come in way too fast.  I'll mention here that when the Mooney Caravan flies (and we hope you'll join us on a flight to Oshkosh soon), we fly our approach at 90 knots and no flaps. And yet we all land just fine. All that's required is enough runway. 

So when you find yourself coming in hot, use the event to practice either 1) a go around, as you did or 2) landing by holding the plane in ground effect until it just can't fly any longer and rolls on. The key is with power off, hold the plane off the runway as long as possible.

Both are good skills to have. And of course, the available runway might determine your choice of 1 or 2.

The next time I go up I'm going to hop over to Chino with it's 4,858' and 7,000' runways where I have plenty of room to try holding it off longer. I know that Corona is plenty long with its 3,200' runway and I generally just tap the brakes when exiting at the end where my hangar is, but there is something subconscious about watching those trees at the far end come closer while still floating along... Just need more practice.

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Don't let the extra long runway confuse your sight picture Richard.  You won't be the first to do that. 

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2 hours ago, N6758N said:

It was painted about 5ish years ago to look like an Ovation, red and black stripes. Someone did the whole panel over to include a 530W, Stec 60-2 and one of the older style digital engine monitors. I was always curious about the panel, it looked like someone had overlayed on top of the original structure which made it stick into your face. Wasn't my favorite to fly due to that. I do not think I have any pictures unfortunately. 

Oh man, If you ever get a chance I would really appreciate a current picture of it.

Tom

 

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53 minutes ago, Hyett6420 said:

Don't let the extra long runway confuse your sight picture Richard.  You won't be the first to do that. 

It's where I did all of my PPL training so I'm used to it there.

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Richard,

I've bounced my plane twice since I've owned it and both times i was coming in a little fast and light on fuel and payload; both were also early in ownership of my Mooney. I think it's something every Mooney pilot should experience so you know what to expect and how to handle it. Nice work handling yours. As you know a bounce occurs when there is too much airspeed so I now fly precisely 70 knots over the numbers when heavy, -5 knots when 300 lbs or more under gross and +5 in gusty wind conditions. I learned this from Don Kaye after I purchased his landing DVD and materials that came with it. I've never bounced a landing since. My CFI still thinks 70 is too slow but I think that's a common mistake some CFIs that are unfamiliar with Mooneys make.

Kevin

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70 is a good speed when light, 75 heavy, plus any gust factor required.

Except Richard and I use MPH!

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On January 16, 2017 at 6:20 AM, Hank said:

Another good write up, Richard.

The next time you are fast on final, just hold the plane off in the flare, keep the nose up and stay centered on the runway. You will experience the Mooney float, just don't let the wind blow you to the side. Expect about 100' of float for every 1 mph you are fast . . . Eventually the excess speed will bleed off and you will land. So don't do this if the runway is short.

Having the wisdom to do a go around is a good thing, not something to be embarrassed by. If something isn't right, go around and try again, that's how pilots stay alive and airplanes stay undamaged.

I find that if fast, I level off 20' or so off the ground until slow enough, then descend to ground effect for flare.  This allows you to slow down much quicker than if you go into ground effect at the same speed.  It also reduces the chance for a bounce

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The first day in a looooong time where I was home and the ceilings weren't jump-up-and-touchable. Nothing like a 45 minute flight around the neighborhood as a place of refuge from news and drama. Topped by a fun ride down the ILS wire to 21L. Win!


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Bad weather and a real bad cold have kept me grounded for over two weeks and now I've come down with a case of tendinitis bad news is it's left shoulder and I'm left handed good news is Johnson bar is on the right. Man I can't wait to fly again.

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