Jump to content

Richard's Training Journey


Recommended Posts

Most places, IMC is accompanied by winds and some degree of bumpiness. Training in actual conditions is good, but better be prepared for it to not always be calm and smooth--when it is, that's a bonus!

That said, the strongest winds aloft I've experienced have been in VFR conditions. 20" / 250p, 50 rich, 10,000 mzl, 68 knot groundspeed.

But there've been times logging actual when it was hard to read the numbers on the GPS, too. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

*Members that donate $10 or more do not see advertisements*

  • Replies 197
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Patience... PASSED!!!!!!  Just got back and filling out paper. Had to wait for the haze to clear before flying so didn't take off until about 2pm CA time. Write up to follow, probably tomorr

Time to resurrect this old thread, 4+ years later. I finally put a GPS in the panel back in September which I wanted before starting to work on my Instrument Rating. I've been studying some off and on

I took my first IFR training flight yesterday. I loved it even though I was chasing the plane, felt like I was behind it almost the whole time, and ended up so task saturated that on our return while

Posted Images

16 minutes ago, Danb said:

Hey Paul does that mean if you get 100 on the exam no questions asked, great incentive to crank up the studying 

No, I got a 100% :) The examiner is still required to ask a minimal # of questions (2?) on topics from the ACS, and if you answer those satisfactorily they'll move onto the next topic without further questions.  He just won't have to to ask additional questions on the areas you got wrong. 

Still though, orals really vary all over the place in length regardless of minimum # of questions the examiner must ask. One of my students did a very quick instrument oral and the examiner was very complimentary about him being well prepared, but he wasn't able to complete the checkride in the 60 day window and had to start over with a fresh oral. Second time it was a different examiner and my student was no less prepared than first time and the examiner kept going in the oral for 6 hrs! That was unheard of, and I personally think it was because the examiner had a cold and didn't want to fly that day - which was no problem, but he still insisted on giving the students his money's worth that day!  I felt bad for the student, but the examiner once again said he did quite well.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I took my first IFR training flight yesterday. I loved it even though I was chasing the plane, felt like I was behind it almost the whole time, and ended up so task saturated that on our return while flying the RNAV into KFUL I was looking at the vertical deviation which showed us above glideslope but I was holding us level thinking we were below glideslope. I have used it enough just for fun in VFR conditions that I know how to read the instrument, but my brain was not helping me out... Some great experience and looking forward to the next flight Wednesday night.

If you want to read about the flight I wrote it up on my blog.

https://intothesky.com/2021/02/21/ifr-training-chasing-the-plane/

881569686_IFR20210220.jpg.57a01277157e62621fcc946af8e4069d.jpg

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Way to go Richard!

There  are a few cool things about learning and the IR...

It gives soooo many opportunities to define what your level of task saturation actually is....

Kind of like recognizing your O2 levels as they drop...  

The faster you learn all the details... the better off you will be...

But there is always going to be a day when the saturation level is hard to deal with...

That’s probably when you ask ATC for some help...   :)

PP thoughts only, not IFR current...

Best regards,

-a-

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Flights 2 and 3 were last Wednesday evening and Saturday morning. Flying at night with foggles is great, there are no shadows from the sun to give you any outside reference. We just did more basic maneuvers (turns/climbs/descents/straight and level) along with some more unusual attitude recoveries. The first couple were easy, the third one after a couple turns I lost track of what he was doing and had no idea what I was going to see on the AI when he said "recover." That was a great experience. Saturday we flew a practice approach into Long Beach and did some partial panel work before going back to the practice approach into KFUL. For the partial panel he just reached over and turned off both G5's which left me with the backup AI that replaced my turn coordinator and I used that along with the ASI/Altimeter/VSI/Compass Card for some climbs/descents and compass turns before he gave me the G5's back.

I used lower RPM and MP (2,350 and 18") which made things much easier. I wasn't behind the plane but adding in the communications with ATC and phraseology I'm not familiar with in flying approaches had me behind the radios. I'm otherwise great on the radios flying around the busy SoCal area and on flight following often so I'm confident that with a little more repetition that will come along nicely.

https://intothesky.com/2021/02/28/ifr-training-flights-2-3/

1494547674_IFR20210224.jpg.c067fc3d5978726aa6af414b098e9dfc.jpg1387766230_IFR20210227.jpg.b366dd386a0e6351ff164f8fd60a0827.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I know how you feel and I also use 2350/18 while training so I could get used to the coms...

after my G5 gets installed- back to ifr training for me!

love the blogs ;o)

-Don

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another flight Wednesday night. We flew the RNAV GPS approach to 29R at KTOA down to LPV minimums. My accuracy and scan continues to improve but still a long way to go. Still trying to get used to the radios for IFR work even though I'm more than comfortable even in the busy LA Airspace on the radios when on flight following, it's just the extra brainpower required to fly instruments doesn't leave a whole lot leftover for the radios. It is reminiscent of when I first started flying and it took most of my brainpower to just fly straight and level or make turns while VFR leaving little left to work the radios. It sure is fun to be training again, and I was excited to see when I got home and pulled up Cloud Ahoy to see that I scored a 96 out of 100 on the approach to KTOA.

https://intothesky.com/2021/03/05/ifr-training-approach-to-lpv-minimums/

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Flight #5 yesterday. We flew the RNAV GPS approach into KTOA again and then the missed approach with the hold. The radio work was a little better although I lost track of where I was on the approach into KTOA and into KFUL and didn't get my gear down and configured before crossing the FAF resulting in being behind the plane the rest of the approach. Still, small steps forward, next flight is Wednesday evening. Complete writeup on my blog along with the audio of the tower telling me to "keep in your own lane sir" when I drifted over the parallel runway at KTOA flying the missed approach.

https://intothesky.com/2021/03/07/ifr-training-great-kid-dont-get-cocky/

834821738_IFR20210306.thumb.jpg.186c079a0264775a82437fd05a63d2d6.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/15/2016 at 11:14 AM, BradB said:

Don,

 

My experience was like yours.   I got my ppl in 1992.  No phase checks or flying with another instructor.   The check ride was given by the head of the flight school.  Once my CFI was confident that I would not make him look bad to his boss, he sent me for the check ride. 

At the end of my check ride, the examiner told me that he knew I would pass based on how I handled the plane and the controls on the first take off.  

I was thinking about adding my commercial for fun, but I'm not sure that I want to torture myself after reading all these stories.  

Brad. 

Brad- 

Do it! The Commercial is the most fun of the checkrides. During my oral for the commercial I stated that I look at every checkride as a learning experience and hope that I'm able to communicate a proficiency level on the required material so that we can continue with the practical test. Most examiners do not have a lot of Mooney time. So do tell they if they want to demonstrate a lazy 8 or other maneuver they can. My examiner asked if he could show me what he was looking for in a lazy 8 and I asked him to demonstrate. It was THE WORST lazy 8 I'd ever seen in the Mooney Missile (heavy nose). He looked at me afterward and said "you really know your airplane" and then "let's go back to the field for some landings).

-Seth

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard-

I'm glad you are doing this training - it's already making you a better pilot.

-Seth

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

After postponing flights on Wednesday and Friday due to an Airmet Zulu, Convective Outlooks, and storms in the area we got to take another training flight yesterday. We flee the approach into Hawthorne and the missed approach with the hold. Some mistakes made, the radio work was better although I still hit the task saturation point a couple of times. Small steps forward, a long way to go still, but still enjoying the journey.

https://intothesky.com/2021/03/14/ifr-training-small-improvements/

1075459500_IFR20210313.jpg.0c92c0ae378cf1f6ea13355fc8072c29.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/8/2021 at 12:06 AM, Seth said:

Brad- 

Do it! The Commercial is the most fun of the checkrides. During my oral for the commercial I stated that I look at every checkride as a learning experience and hope that I'm able to communicate a proficiency level on the required material so that we can continue with the practical test. Most examiners do not have a lot of Mooney time. So do tell they if they want to demonstrate a lazy 8 or other maneuver they can. My examiner asked if he could show me what he was looking for in a lazy 8 and I asked him to demonstrate. It was THE WORST lazy 8 I'd ever seen in the Mooney Missile (heavy nose). He looked at me afterward and said "you really know your airplane" and then "let's go back to the field for some landings).

-Seth

@Seth I haven’t forgotten about the commercial.  I actually ordered an updated copy of the book recently.   But now I’m going to have to do the training and check ride in a Meridian.    It has been done.  And my friend just did his in his TBM - pressure is on.  
 

brad 

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BradB said:

@Seth I haven’t forgotten about the commercial.  I actually ordered an updated copy of the book recently.   But now I’m going to have to do the training and check ride in a Meridian.    It has been done.  And my friend just did his in his TBM - pressure is on.  
 

brad 

 

WOW! For the dollar cost of doing so per hour, it may make more sense to rent a retract or TAA for the commercial. You'll have to make sure there's a DPE that can give you the checkride in your aircraft prior to committing - then again, with the Meridian, you can cover a lot of ground to a DPE that can do it!

-Seth

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m torn...

Do I cheer for the guy who used to fly the coolest Mooney...

-or-

Do I cheer for the guy who now flys the coolest Mooney... TBM

That’s a tough one... :)

Go Brad!

Best regards,

-a-

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I flew last Wednesday and Friday evenings and thought I should get this posted before my planned flight this evening. We filed IFR, got clearance, and flew to San Bernardino KSBD on Wednesday and Palomar KCRQ Friday. On Friday's flight everything felt like it was starting to come together. There is still a long way to go but it felt more comfortable flying on the instruments. I put the camera under the wing as the forecast was for 1,000' overcast at Palomar and I was hoping to get a little actual time, but even though the marine layer was over the west end of the airport during our pre-flight briefing it had moved away before we got there. However, coming back I did end up with some of the best views that I never saw in flight. On reviewing the video at home I saw that when we were routed back out offshore the sun had just set, there was a thin marine layer with the lights of the many container ships glowing up through, and the clouds looked like waves.

https://intothesky.com/2021/03/24/ifr-training-filing-and-flying-ifr/

1155979903_LongBeach.thumb.jpg.ce497ebfd4e37768b124eb8698336e99.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Flights 9 and 10 last week. Flight 9 was Wednesday evening, we filed and flew from KFUL to F70, landed, picked up our clearance and flew back. On both flights we did not fly a single segment or point that we had been cleared for, the flights were entirely radar vectors and assigned altitudes. That was a good excercise.

Flight 10 was Friday evening. We picked up flight following and shot the RNAV into KCNO, went missed back to the PDZ VOR for a hold, followed by the VOR/GPS-A approach to KAJO, went missed and picked up vectors to the RNAV into KFUL for a full stop. That was a very busy flight but a great learning experience. If you want to read about the entire flights you can on my blog.

https://intothesky.com/2021/04/11/ifr-training-flights-9-10-new-challenges/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like progress, Richard!

After a couple years with no IFR flying, I'm getting back in. My 2nd flight was last week, we did an ILS into KMGM (ILS 28 Y). Tower said keep the speed up, there were 2 others behind me and he was busy. Went old school, used VOR #2 to track radials from the VOR to locate each waypoint, while the GPS was tuned to the localizer but not showing the map. Center the needles!

Quick miss to get out of his hair, did a few laps around the hold, then cleared to the IAF at home, ~30nm away. And he forgot about me . . . .

When 5-6 NM from IAF, I started to slow down, then at a break called "Approach, 4 NM from [IAF]" and he cleared me for the approach and to land, cancel in the air or on the ground. We opted for on the ground.

GPS 36 back into KALX is a black hole approach. When I pulled off the foggles at DA,the runway lights were all by themselves in a sea of nothingness. And it's an uphill runway . . . But a good landing.

Be sure your CFII makes you work, makes you sweat and takes you out of your comfort zone. That's when you really get procedures beat into your head (or at least that's when it finally penetrates the concrete under my ballcap).

Keep writing, we're all enjoying reading and reliving it with you, when we aren't out doing it ourselves, too.  ;)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Hank said:

Be sure your CFII makes you work, makes you sweat and takes you out of your comfort zone. That's when you really get procedures beat into your head (or at least that's when it finally penetrates the concrete under my ballcap).

He makes me work and lets me make mistakes as long as they aren't putting us in a bad situation. I'm glad he isn't constantly telling me what to do or to "watch you/heading/altitude/speed or whatever." Letting me get behind the plane and try to catch up, fumble with the GPS trying to get it programmed for a change on the fly, asking ATC to "Say again for 878" instead of telling me what they said when I didn't get all of the transmission are the lessons that really stick. If I ask him he questions answers or if I need help with something he will but otherwise he's letting me muddle through it in the air. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Skates97 said:

Flights 9 and 10 last week. Flight 9 was Wednesday evening, we filed and flew from KFUL to F70, landed, picked up our clearance and flew back. On both flights we did not fly a single segment or point that we had been cleared for, the flights were entirely radar vectors and assigned altitudes. That was a good excercise.

Flight 10 was Friday evening. We picked up flight following and shot the RNAV into KCNO, went missed back to the PDZ VOR for a hold, followed by the VOR/GPS-A approach to KAJO, went missed and picked up vectors to the RNAV into KFUL for a full stop. That was a very busy flight but a great learning experience. If you want to read about the entire flights you can on my blog.

https://intothesky.com/2021/04/11/ifr-training-flights-9-10-new-challenges/

You write well.  I read your Blog on those last flights and noted something that will allow ATC to view you as more of a professional.  They listen to people all day long and can tell whether you know what you're doing both by how you sound and what you say.  The pro is likely to get more favorable treatment from ATC because ATC is more likely to trust the pro (or non pro who sounds like a pro).  When ATC gives a climb or descent or when you're climbing or descending and a handoff is given, the AIM says you should come  back with, or check in with, 2 altitudes, the altitude you are at and the altitude to which you are going. Listen to the Airlines pilots on the radio.  You will always hear them coming back with 2 altitudes.  As long as I'm at it, I'll add couple of other things that don't relate to your communications, but that I've heard wrong on so many occasions.  It's the way to say altitudes.   From 0 to 10,000 feet it is a specific terminalogy, from 10,000 to 18,000 is another terminology, and from 18,000 on up is a third.  Leave off adjectives when telling ATC your altitudes. i.e. don't say 3,000 climbing to 4,000.  Say 3,000 climbing 4,000.  The former could be confusing.  If you really want to seem like a person who doesn't know the rules, then leave off your current altitude, add "to", and say "point" i.e. "Mooney 1234, climbing to 3 point 5."  If I heard that communication, I'd be wary of that pilot, and I suspect ATC would, too.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

My instructor always told me to avoid using "to" and "for". Avoids mixing up words and numbers. Same thing as don said, but id also avoid anychance of using "for" such as "climbing 2500 for 8500".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


*Members that donate $10 or more do not see advertisements*



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.