tony

piper crash in atlanta

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I know how heavy my Lance gets with no power...I'd hate to have something happen on takeoff with 4 people on board.  Very sad.  I'd be curious to know more factual information though...return to the airport was not an option?

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I know how heavy my Lance gets with no power...I'd hate to have something happen on takeoff with 4 people on board.  Very sad.  I'd be curious to know more factual information though...return to the airport was not an option?

I've met you a couple of times when I've stopped in at BGF. Last time I tried to come you all had run out of fuel and I believe it was you who radioed me from your Lance and suggested THA. Always enjoy stopping at BGF, real friendly group of folks. I got the Mooney and a fixed gear Toga. You the airport manager, correct?

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I saw a blurb that said it was a group of folks from Asheville that were on their way to Biloxi and stopped in for fuel. I can't confirm that latter part, though. It does seem from the eyewitness reports that he stalled it in.

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Taking off out of PDK doesn't leave lots of options in the event of power loss. I am sure from the location of the crash site that he did not have sufficient altitude to return to the field. Probably trying what appeared to be the only viable option---putting it down on 285.

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Taking off out of PDK doesn't leave lots of options in the event of power loss. I am sure from the location of the crash site that he did not have sufficient altitude to return to the field. Probably trying what appeared to be the only viable option---putting it down on 285.

And from the sound of the report, he didn't hit a car on the road.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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I've met you a couple of times when I've stopped in at BGF. Last time I tried to come you all had run out of fuel and I believe it was you who radioed me from your Lance and suggested THA. Always enjoy stopping at BGF, real friendly group of folks. I got the Mooney and a fixed gear Toga. You the airport manager, correct?

 

Hey, yeah, I know exactly who you are!  Sorry about that day...expected that fuel tanker to be there at 9:00 am, not 2:00 pm.  Glad I was able to catch you in the air though rather than after you'd shutdown.  That rarely happens, but it does happen.  Please feel free to come back anytime!

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Hey, yeah, I know exactly who you are!  Sorry about that day...expected that fuel tanker to be there at 9:00 am, not 2:00 pm.  Glad I was able to catch you in the air though rather than after you'd shutdown.  That rarely happens, but it does happen.  Please feel free to come back anytime!

Absolutely! One of my favorite stops. You run a great airport!

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Save a few bucks from investing in those multiple GPS's, paint jobs, interiors, and other panel gizmos for solid, continual and professional flight training, my friends. Sad & RIP.  :(

 

http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2015/05/08/nr-4-dead-in-plane-crash-on-highway.cnn

When an engine fail at low altitude the pilot options are very limited even for a CFII++. But an engine analyzer can help in preventing an engine failure.

José

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At the risk of pirating the thread, it occurred to me to wonder how often CFIs kill themselves in crashes. We often hear (rightfully) that we should train with a CFI, but do CFIs practice what they preach to the extent their likelihood of crashing is substantially less than us ordinary mortals. Would getting our CFI certificate automatically increase our chances a tremendous amount. It would be interesting to see some statistics.

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This is not a comment on this accident .

 

When I take off , I say. below 1000 agl , i have two choices ,1) gear up straight ahead. 2) gear down straight ahead. 

 

I dont know what i would do in that situation, but I say it anyway. " gear up straight ahead, gear down straight ahead , we go."

 

don't know where I got that from 

carl

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I don't think getting a CFI rating will make you a safer pilot but for sure getting an AP rating will do. The Air Force and some airlines prefer pilot candidates with an engineering degree.

José

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Don, the best info I've seen is http://www.aopa.org/-/media/Files/AOPA/Home/Pilot-Resources/Safety-and-Proficiency/Accident-Analysis/Nall-Report/08nall.pdf. 

It doesn't break out CFI, but if you look at the graphs around page 8, commercial license doesn't seem to be the trick, ATP however...

 

Lies, damn lies and statistics ;-) Seems to me never getting past student certificate makes you the safest.

 

Might also have a bit to do with equipment being flown by ATP pilots. Usually turbine, twin. 

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At the risk of pirating the thread, it occurred to me to wonder how often CFIs kill themselves in crashes. We often hear (rightfully) that we should train with a CFI, but do CFIs practice what they preach to the extent their likelihood of crashing is substantially less than us ordinary mortals. Would getting our CFI certificate automatically increase our chances a tremendous amount. It would be interesting to see some statistics.

We certainly aren't immune from awful airmanship.

There are a couple CFIs I will not fly with and a couple 45 hour private pilots I wouldn't mind telling to wake me up when we get there.

And there are certain planes I will not fly without recurrent training...which includes any twin if I haven't done single engine training in the last 6 months.

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Looks like it happened right where the "31A" is on this photo, heading away from the airport. Looks like they hit the center barrier dead on. Just to the right was some much more open areas.

Doesn't seem to be any skid marks. SSCB?

You can't always see obstructions until it's too late.

post-7887-0-85984000-1431194998_thumb.jp

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Looks like they spun it in. Sad, very sad. I have quite a few hours in Cherokees, Arrows and Lances. They are not the best gliding aircraft but they do glide just fine. I think everyone should go out this weekend, climb to a few thousand feet, establish 85mph/knot (short vs long body) climb, leave your gear out (to simulate real descent rates with total power loss) and pull the power back. It takes effort to maintain airspeed. You must push the nose forward, do it quickly...

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I was told by a pilot at KPDK that morning that the line guys said it was trailing black smoke on take off.

 

I have never flown a PA-32, but I can't imagine he had much in the way of time to think about where he was going to put it. He was heavy and it was hot.  I don't care how well a plane glides, transitioning from climb to engine out best glide speed is critical affair at low altitude.  It looks like he was producing partial power from the CNN footage (attached screenshot). One blade missing and the others are pig tailed like they hit multiple times.

KPDK Prop.tiff

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I was told by a pilot at KPDK that morning that the line guys said it was trailing black smoke on take off.

 

I have never flown a PA-32, but I can't imagine he had much in the way of time to think about where he was going to put it. He was heavy and it was hot.  I don't care how well a plane glides, transitioning from climb to engine out best glide speed is critical affair at low altitude.  It looks like he was producing partial power from the CNN footage (attached screenshot). One blade missing and the others are pig tailed like they hit multiple times.

attachicon.gifKPDK Prop.tiff

 

I don't think he was making any power. Look at the direction of the bends. 

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