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Howdy all, Every forum I belong to usually has a thread where folks can add the latest joke or anecdote about the forum's subject matter. Usually everyone adds their jokes to the end of the thread an

Unless it's a landing light. Then it takes a Pilot, A&P, IA, DER and 4 more from the FSDO.

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Why am I a pilot and not a doctor.....

When young, I decided to go to Medical School .

At the entrance exam we were asked to arrange the letters NPEIS and form the name of an important body part which is most useful when erect.

Those who said spine are doctors today.

The rest of us went to flight school.

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On 4/29/2015 at 9:01 AM, Wildhorsesracing said:

If male pilots sit in a cockpit, where do female pilots sit?

In the Military the answer would be the crew compartment, apparently millions of dollars were spent changing every Military manual in existence in order to remove that “offensive” term.

Turnine Inlet Temperature was also considered offensive do to its Acronym of TIT, so much more money was spent to change it to Inlet Turbine Temperature or ITT so as not to be offensive.

‘You can’t make this stuff up.

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41 minutes ago, A64Pilot said:

In the Military the answer would be the crew compartment, apparently millions of dollars were spent changing every Military manual in existence in order to remove that “offensive” term.

Turnine Inlet Temperature was also considered offensive do to its Acronym of TIT, so much more money was spent to change it to Inlet Turbine Temperature or ITT so as not to be offensive.

‘You can’t make this stuff up.

"Truth is stranger than fiction, because fiction has to make sense."

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I’m pretty uncomfortable with the spelling...

But easily got used to it in discussions around here...

 

If I use ITT, will everyone know what I’m talking about?

Best regards,

-a-

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6 hours ago, carusoam said:

I’m pretty uncomfortable with the spelling...

But easily got used to it in discussions around here...

 

If I use ITT, will everyone know what I’m talking about?

Best regards,

-a-

We'll just think you're dyslexic.

TIT as the name of a a system doesn't  mean something else (middle school sense of humor notwithstanding) any more than "screw" means more than what you call or do with a metal pin having a helix pattern and slotted or star-shaped head (oops! another bad word!). 

There are plenty of words and phrases which have multiple connotations. Language can indeed be insulting, and using it in jokes not funny at all, but let's not get carried away.

 

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6 hours ago, midlifeflyer said:

There are plenty of words and phrases which have multiple connotations.

Don't forget international marketing. Many examples of companies back in the day, before they got savvy, who came up with terms for their products that turned out to be offensive in foreign locales.

Years ago, COMSOL Multiphysics, a Swedish finite element analysis program, was called "FEMLAB". I had an early copy of it and wrote to the company that 'FEMLAB' might not be the best choice of name in the male-dominated US engineering milieu. I don't know if that email did anything, but they did change the name.

There was another instance over the years where a new research group's acronym (like TIT above) was ill-conceived for the American taste--they changed it after having it brought to their attention.

Gottah love the Comedy Planet, you cannot make this stuff up.

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33 minutes ago, HRM said:

Don't forget international marketing. Many examples of companies back in the day, before they got savvy, who came up with terms for their products that turned out to be offensive in foreign locales.

Years ago, COMSOL Multiphysics, a Swedish finite element analysis program, was called "FEMLAB". I had an early copy of it and wrote to the company that 'FEMLAB' might not be the best choice of name in the male-dominated US engineering milieu. I don't know if that email did anything, but they did change the name.

There was another instance over the years where a new research group's acronym (like TIT above) was ill-conceived for the American taste--they changed it after having it brought to their attention.

Gottah love the Comedy Planet, you cannot make this stuff up.

The classic was Chevrolet marketing the Nova, named for the exploding star, in Central America. "No va" of course is Spanish for "it doesn't go" . . . . .

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The US Navy had a Team create a version of OSHA for our facilities and ships.  After looking at the resulting acronym, they decided to call it a program, though, which is also a stupid sounding acronym for the Navy:

Navy
Occupational
Safety and
Health
Inspection
Program(S)

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One company I worked for refereed to their employees as associates. We all got a kick out of the associate satisfaction survey the first year it was sent out. The next year they changed the name to the associate engagement survey. ;)

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19 minutes ago, skydvrboy said:

One company I worked for refereed to their employees as associates. We all got a kick out of the associate satisfaction survey the first year it was sent out. The next year they changed the name to the associate engagement survey. ;)

Where I used to work, the Safety Dept. became Safety, Health & Environment. I sent several acronym-laden emails to them and they rapidly became Environment,  Health & Safety!  :D :lol: :D

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Midway through flight school, a consultant to the Navy insisted a student's self-esteem would be hurt by calling a training event failure a "down".  So with her suggestion, a failure would be called a 'signal of difficulty'.

Would you rather be 'Downed' or 'SODded'?

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