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M20F-1968

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M20F-1968 last won the day on July 31 2018

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About M20F-1968

  • Rank
    Won't Leave!
  • Birthday 09/09/1954

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  • Yahoo
    john.breda@gmail.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Boston, MA
  • Interests
    skiing, classical music
  • Reg #
    N954N
  • Model
    M20F 1968, reborn in 2015

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  1. That is not true. The Rochester gauges can and should be used to replace the originals. Mine is a 1968 F model and these were purchased for my plane. The original style fuel gauges installed in 1968 are junk. The Rochester gauges are a distinct improvement. My serial number is way before S/N 22-1257. All the F models have the same fuel capacity, unless the long range tanks were installed, in which case the same Rochester fuel gauges are still used. John Breda
  2. I can speak to this topic with the wisdom of experience. I purchased my 68 F model after it had been sitting in a hangar in Dallas, Texas 26 years in pieces. I hired Russell Stallings to drive up and do a pre-buy inspection. He took the airplane apart more than it already was a part. It had 1975 hours total time, no damage history, no corrosion issues, and had an intact engine that had been rebuilt to factory specifications 20 years earlier and never flown subsequently with a RaJay turbo. Russell Stallings reported that it was a "nice airplane" and would be a good basis for a proj
  3. I have a very nicely built Grimes light (designed for aircraft and used on closet-like spaces on jets) that I purchased to use in my plane before I got my hands on an Ovation Interior. Since the Ovation interior already had interior lights, I did not use this. 14 or 28 volt should not be an issue. It can be had at a reasonable price. I'll check on details if you are interested. My cell is (617) 877-0025 John Breda
  4. I do not know where you are located, but K&D Aircraft painting in Robbinsville-Trenton Airport NJ I am sure can do a great job for you and at a fair price. John Breda
  5. ALCO TPC13CO SPST-N/O 125VAC 1A Momentary Mini Push Switch This may sound counterintuitive based on the description of what you want however you might consider this switch. Generally in a Mooney there is not much room to put the PTT switch. That is true for me with my Ovation yokes and multiple switches on the pilot side. I bought several switches and looked them over with my mechanic (very experienced). Some had tactile feedback, and this ALCO switch did not. This is the one he recommended and given his experience I went with it. He is very experience with Mo
  6. If you try to cut a slot with a Dremel, use a carbide wheel, and also use a piece of thin metal (hard, thin steel or other metals can work) about 0.040" thick or other appropriate thickness given screw head geometry. Drill a hole in the metal and place it over the head, so that if, and likely when the Dremel tool slips, it will ruin the protective metal and not the airplane skin. John Breda
  7. I can make more of these if necessary. Need a regular lathe and a watchmaker's lathe to finish the back side. John Breda cell: 617-877-0025
  8. I can make more of these if necessary. John Breda
  9. How much did he trim back? Any pictures? Did he use insulation that has an adhesive the sticks to the skin. I used the Soundex stuff, which does not have any adhesive. It is just put in place in between the tubes or other compartmented areas. It has a aluminum foil-like layer that can help hold it in. I used aluminum tapes as well. John Breda
  10. Good job getting it down on its wheels. As I was reading your story however, I was thinking that this is a problem that is begging a go around, just to have some time to sort out the issues, in an unrushed manner and make sure you do not become the victim of a distraction. Your solution and result would likely have been the same, but if there was no real emergency and you had the luxury of time, go around, tell ATC what you are doing, ask for a straight and level segment, put the autopilot on at a safe altitude and take your time. The nut could work its way loose and fall off the threa
  11. If I were to use spacers as suggested above, what material should they be made of? Seems like making aluminum or Nylon would work. What may be best? John Breda
  12. This part can be made from fiberglass as a free-hand lay-up even if you do not have an original. To give you an example of what is possible, the pictured part is a free-hand lay-up part for my F for the wheelwell cover. You can start with modeling clay, wood, styrofoam, anything that gives you a starting shape. Then sand, cut and re-fiberglass as needed. Your final part (if you make an initial model and use it as a mold) should be made from flame retardant fiberglass resin. John Breda
  13. You are much better off without the access panels, and using the factory cowl deck. However, you must then design direct access to the avionics by having the equipment and trays slide out of the panel into your lap. John Breda
  14. Phillips X/C 20/50 is designed for break-in and may be continued for the life of the engine. With the RaJay you have a non-turbo charged engine that thinks it is at sea level all the time. Add CamGuard when oil consumption stabilizes. Fly it like you stole it while breaking it in. John Breda
  15. I have a F7666A-2, HC-C2YK-1BF Hartzell Propeller on my 68 F. It has a restriction of No Continuous Operations between 2100-2350. I have been repeatedly told that low power situations such as in the pattern are not a problem and are not "Continuous Operations" and you may operate in this "restricted" range for landing. This has seemed reasonable to me. You have to get down and you have to control the airplane when doing so. Is there anyone here who has information to the contrary? John Breda
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