Mooney217RN

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Mooney217RN last won the day on August 3

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About Mooney217RN

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  1. A fine bird! I bought one (Ovation 2GX, converted to Ovation 3GX) last year.
  2. It's time to replace your engine driven fuel pump.
  3. My point exactly from the original post. I was merely trying to elaborate why Cirrus outsells Mooney, which is clearly marketing, or a lack thereof. I will refrain from commentary in the future, I wasn't intending to start a thread of discourse. By the way, I like the Cirrus. I just feel the Mooney is a better plane for me, and a far better value.
  4. Like this family? https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2066691/Plane-Crash-near-Chicagos-Crystal-Lake-kills-businessman-Ray-Harris-2-daughters.html
  5. The climb rate on my Ovation 3GX is far better than the Cirrus. The cruise speed on the Ovation is around 190+ the Cirrus is 175. I flew my Ovation Thursday morning, the Cirrus that evening. I think I know the diffference.
  6. Wrong. There have been fatalities and severe injuries from the impact. I want to say that there was one earlier this year in San Diego with fatalities. Could be wrong about that, but I vaguely recall it.
  7. Somebody asked how new is my Ovation. It’s an Ovation 3GX, pre-ultra. I prefer the single door, I’m used to it after decades of Mooney flying. I have been in two Ultras, one Ovation and one Acclaim. A slight bit nicer than my Ovation, but the Cirrus interior ergonomics are noticeably nicer, just my opinion. i live in Northern California, and at the AOPA Fly In in June, no Mooney reps or factory new plane on display. That’s simply unacceptable from my perspective. The only AOPA event in the Western United States, and unless I missed it, we were not represented. Pretty pathetic. I attended an Air Show at my home airport (TRK) last month, Cirrus had multiple planes on display. Went to an airport open house in Carson City, Nevada in June, same thing, new Cirrus aircraft with reps on display. Cirrus is marketing their product line, Mooney is not. Therein lies the biggest difference.
  8. I couldn’t agree more with your comment. Similar to those that buy an Acclaim but use it as an Ovation. You’re spot on.
  9. I read the thread on the message board and felt compelled to start a new one, only because I have had this discussion with someone who recently opted for a new SR22 GTS. Last evening, I had the pleasure of flying that brand new SR22 GTS. I have about 25 hours +/- in the SR22 by sheer chance, I had thought about going from the Mooney line into a Cirrus years ago, but there were some issues with the Cirrus I didn't like. From my perspective, Cirrus is beating Mooney in sales handily for a few reasons. First and foremost, marketing. I attend a few industry shows and open houses at airports throughout any given year. I never, ever see a Mooney on display. Yet Cirrus representatives seem to always be there. Mooney is notoriously missing from most air shows and airport open houses. I have been to three this summer, no sign of anyone from Mooney, but Cirrus was present at all three events. When it comes to ergonomics, I think Cirrus has done a wonderful job. Their aircraft are well appointed, comfortable, and the interior is well designed. The side stick is a bit odd, but you quickly get used to it. I am a huge proponent of the throttle quadrant being controlled by levers. My 1974 E Model had levers. My new Ovation has vernier controls. I prefer the levers. Cirrus has a quirky lever that controls throttle & prop through a mechanical linkage, but it works. Their mixture control is a lever. The interior layout in the Cirrus is better than the Mooney, period. The seats are much nicer, the layout is user friendly and everything is easy to reach. The fuel selector valve is on the center console, not on the floor. (In my former E Model it was under my right heel, so who am I to complain?). The Cirrus handles well, lands easily, flies pretty smoothly. I have always liked it. It's a good airplane, and if you ask me, if Cirrus is getting people to buy their product and get into airplanes, more power to them. That's a good thing. Now I am in a unique position, as I have a near new Ovation, so I can compare. But why are we comparing? That's the question we need to ask ourselves. We're comparing oranges to nectarines. Both round, both fruit, both taste good. That's where it ends. The Cirrus lacks a few things which I don't like. Starting with retractable gear, nosewheel steering, speed brakes & true prop control. I suppose the SR22 line doesn't need speed brakes. Then there's the performance - you guessed it, we rock. My Ovation can smoke an SR22 GTS in all performance categories, spare landing. Climb rate, cruise speed and handling? The Mooney has that Cirrus beat hands down. Keep in mind we're talking an Ovation, a normally aspirated IO-550G against a turbo 550. Something else I noticed last evening flying the Cirrus - while the cockpit is very nice, we have more room in the modern day Mooneys. The new owner of this SR22 has flown with me in my Ovation, and she noticed it too. I am not sure about useful load, nor do I care. The Mooney is a far better bang for the buck no matter how you dice it. Landing the Cirrus is a piece of cake. Landing the Ovation, you better be on your game or else. Now there's no question that Mooney manufactures a better product, so why are people gravitating towards the Cirrus? Besides the obvious I have outlined above, which are correctable shortcomings, there are two primary reasons - first is culture being marketed by Cirrus. They're going after a younger audience who might have very well learned in an SR20 at a flight school. Mooneys don't exactly make it into flight schools very often, although my flight school years ago had an E model, which is likely why I am flying an Ovation today. The younger crowd loves the digitization of the cockpit, and Cirrus has done an excellent job designing it. The other reason Cirrus is selling airplanes at a good pace is that you can go from being a low time pilot into a Cirrus pretty easily. The transition isn't as cumbersome or challenging as going from a C172 into an Acclaim or Ovation. You really can't do that, it's not practical or feasible. Cirrus has designed a plane for people to transition into once they get their certificate, it's just that simple. Now for the hidden shortcomings. Cirrus owners haven't a clue about what the maintenance expenses are going to be. Those SR22's will kill your wallet on maintenance. Further, the Cirrus concept is that you will buy one now, and buy one in 5-10 years to replace the one you have now, similar to an automobile purchase. Brilliant marketing concept, and again, they're marketing this product phenomenally well. Finally, let's remember the Mooney is a High Performance Complex aircraft. The Cirrus is NOT a Complex aircraft. You don't need a Complex endorsement. One other dirty little secret they never tell the owners about those lovely Cirri - you pull the chute, you total the airplane right there and then, and there's no guarantee you're going to survive once the parachute is deployed. But they need that parachute for more than the reasons you know about; the sink rate on an engine out is about as bad as it gets. It comes down well, and if the engine poops out, you might as well be flying the Space Shuttle, because that's the kind of sink rate this thing has. The glide ratio is horrible, I think it's about 8:1. Another good reason why they have that parachute. If Mooney wants to compete with Cirrus, they need to go back to manufacturing the 201 or the 252 Encore, better the ergonomics and market the line with enthusiasm. You can transition into a 201 or Encore fairly easily in my opinion once you have a few hundred hours of experience. To me, having flown both as recently as yesterday, the differences are glaring, and overcoming the shortcomings on the Mooney line are easily achieved. Mooney Aircraft sell themselves, once you get into the cockpit and fly them. And therein lies the problem, there's nobody committed at Mooney who is pushing the product line out to the public.
  10. Actually looks like a good buy. Here's some things to consider however - get compressions off all 4 cylinders. If any are below 72, you have new cylinders to buy. The 3 blade prop is pretty, but...be forwarned that it throws off the balance on a 4 cylinder engine. The only 3 blader that works is the MT composite. A few other matters to look at - when was the engine overhauled? Beyond 12 years, and you must do an oil analysis, pull the screen, and search for wear/tear. A/D on the yokes/control tubes. The tubes must be inspected at the yoke mount for signs of wear and/or cracking. Finally, fuel selector valve is another item to look at for servicing.
  11. There is a very large Mooney Fly In taking place June 12-14 at Lake Tahoe Airport (KTVL). Go to http://www.vintagemooneygroup.com/PRELakeTahoe2009.htm for information.