AdventureD

Basic Member
  • Content Count

    11
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

5 Neutral

About AdventureD

  • Rank
    Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. ES (fixed gear) with an IO-550. It's pretty easy to fly but with lotsa power and speed, especially for fixed gear. A bit faster than the Cirrus with the same engine. I'm told "float" on landing is "like a Mooney." It lands slightly faster, but handling is nice like the Mooney. Not one you want to stall, though, especially not a power-on stall. Laminar flow wings; very slippery; not a Cessna. Power-off stall is OK if plane is built well, but my practice on this dimension will be about stall avoidance.
  2. A comment like the one you reference won't insult OP. My question created a discussion that as helped me, and that was my goal. This list is a great resource and I appreciate all the responses. ... I'm the one who's gotta figure out what I want :).
  3. OP here... First, the plane's history (which might be determined partly thorugh a filtered discussion with the owner) and a good pre-buy will inform the "money pit" aspect of your comment. Second, the issues are (i) whether the plane is priced above or below the expected value (which was not my question), and (ii) whether any particular plane is relatively more risky than another (which is implicit in my question). Assuming risks (measured by, say, the variance of value) are the same for two planes, additional questions are the purchaser's tolerance for risk and preferences for quality. Sorry, I'm an economist, and familiar with the Capital Asset pricing model. Doesn't change my question. Thanks :). Happy and safe flying, AdventureD
  4. OP here: As I think about this, the 201 is the creme of the vintage Mooneys, and at this price point, a buyer will want a much nicer panel. I'm gonna look at older models for my mission. I'm thinking the resale for an E, F, or G (or even a C) is likely more assured a few years down the road.
  5. I spoke with the pilot. He realized the gear wasn't actually down late and had an inkling to go around and follow the manual procedures. But he didn't. I don't have all the details, but that's what he told me. Humans screw up.
  6. Lancair ES. Long project. Made great progress early on, then stalled (family, etc., the usual stuff). Finally finishing it.
  7. Thanks for all the thoughts. Any thoughts on pricing on this? http://www.skywagons.com/airplanes-forsale/1983-mooney-m20j-201-99900-here-placerville-n87pm. Biggest negative is no GPS, but I've got a 430 I could drop in there. The interior is a little rough, but I can live with that. I'd have a thorough pre-buy to check for corrosion and the engine given that it was rebuilt in 2016 after a gear-up.
  8. I am building an experimental (Lancair), but in the interim I am considering purchasing a Mooney to travel to/from where I am finishing the experimental and between the Bay area and a second home. I envision selling in a year or two after the experimental is finished. My mission would rarely require more than two people. Looking at J and older. Any thoughts on which of these models are likely have the lowest cost two year operating cost when taking into account operating costs and likely resale value in a couple years?