Pasturepilot

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Pasturepilot last won the day on June 19 2019

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About Pasturepilot

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    Advanced Member

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  • Location
    : Atlanta
  • Reg #
    N5746Q
  • Model
    M20C

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  1. @Huitt3106 I had a similar problem after some recent work. Oil temperature either pegged out or showed 80 degrees. Got to chasing wires and the temperature gauge waved like a flag in the breeze when I wiggled the wires just outside the temperature sender’s cannon plug. One of the pins had broken loose inside the plug and pushed back just enough to make contact... sometimes. Got it together well enough To function while I wait on a new plug to arrive.
  2. Plane and Pilot’s “Lessons Learned” (about flying and life) are broader than “I nearly died” tales. If you’d like to frame up a 1500 word story about how an airport can come to be more than just a patch of ground to park a plane, I know some folks who might could make it happen. my username at gmail or PM me and we’ll get that ball rolling.
  3. How many hours on tour mags? My C model had similar issues a couple years before I bought her and we chased all sorts of leads: Carb rebuilt, replaced intake seals, all sorts of stuff. Carb heat helped. (But that’s not gonna help you a bit) it turns out, the 500 hour inspection was about 200 past due. Sent them out and not a hiccup since.
  4. A produce rubber band or a 35 mm film canister will work to keep the button down as well. if you’ve got a good servo, swap it in. Should fix that leak. I fixed a series of leaks in mine which always revealed others. Took a little time to get it squared away, but the system is pretty straightforward once you’ve messed with it a little.
  5. Is it possible that the wires for both of those lights are in the same bundle, possibly chafed against each other? If both of those wires were bare then either one would power the other.
  6. See? Reading comprehension before coffee is a concern in this house. Completely missed that this was all cylinders.
  7. An intake leak would introduce the most air into a cylinder’s intake at low manifold pressure. Someone back me up. I just woke up and am waiting on the coffee to make so obviously anything I say has to be double checked.
  8. When I was the airport kid, I thought all the airline pilots had airplanes.... because most of the guys with planes were airline guys. It was a shock when I started flying for a living and it dawned that most professional pilots hang it up at the end of a trip and don’t think about flying until they’re on their way back to work.
  9. Our little trip west, properly documented: https://www.planeandpilotmag.com/article/flying-to-the-american-west/ it’s easy to lose perspective, bouncing between airliners and general aviation. In a four day trip, we’ll cross the continent a couple times. But each time I’ve recounted this trip to a captain as we’re hauling 200 folks at Mach .78, almost every one’s eyes glazed over. “That’s the trip of a lifetime,” many explained. Here’s hoping it will be one of many trips of this lifetime. That’s what this Mooney Zoom stuff is all about, right?
  10. Open up the big panel on the right side of the fuselage behind the aft cabin bulkhead. They’re attached to the pushrod with cables.
  11. @ROZ, where are you located? I’m sure if you let us know, someone nearby would probably happily invite you for a hangar visit to let you poke around and see some of the features we’re talking about if you haven’t already. I find that first interactions with a design (car, plane, boat, etc) happening with a seller over your shoulder are a lot more intimidating than getting familiar in a friendly environment with no expectations. If Atlanta is nearby, I’ve got a 65 C model you’re welcome to try on for size.
  12. I love the idea of a Mooney kit, but having built an RV-4 tail with my granddaddy and done a couple condition inspections on others, I’ll say this: Mooney’s wing is not suitable for homebuilders. The wing and tail jig for the RV fit easily in our little workshop; a jig for a Mooney wing would take up 40 feet by the time you had enough room to squeeze around either end. The structure has a lot more to it than an RV as well. So you’d have to either have some really advanced quick-build option for the wing, or go to the factory to handle that. Or just make a “plastic“ wing. That could lower the parts count and tie up fewer man hours. Use the experimental wing to develop the process and design for an improvement to the certified design that might reduce hours on the assembly line. This is all hypothetical rambling from me of course. I’m no engineer and to be honest, my antiquated C model is about where I need to be in terms of finances. A 20 year old Mooney is about the best that my day job will ever subsidize. I’m not complaining - when I need to go somewhere in a hurry or in bad weather, I go to the bigger airport, flash my ID and beg nicely for a jumpseat wherever I need to go. My Mooney is for a different kind of travel. I just wish to see continued success for our friends in Kerrville, regardless of how they can brainstorm a way out of their situation. I’ve flown and maintained several designs that had zero factory support. It’s doable, but not what I signed for when I bought a Mooney.
  13. I replaced my landing light and fuel pump switches with new old stock ones I found online. Easy fix.
  14. There are two currently registered locally to me- I’ve got Facebook friend requests sent out to owners hoping to meet up. Fingers crossed.
  15. Different brands have different thicknesses. Cornwall was often much thicker than Snap-On, for instance. If you’ve got a mechanic handy with different brands of sockets, you might try that route.