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Kevin Harberg

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    C-GXTR
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    M18-X

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  1. "M-18C" Pilot report in February 1964 issue of "FLYING MAGAZINE" For optimal reading clarity, "CLICK" on page you wish to view, then click again (twice?) to zoom.
  2. "M-18L" Pilot report in March 1950 issue of "FLYING MAGAZINE" For optimal reading clarity, "CLICK" on page you wish to view, then click again (twice?) to zoom.
  3. Found this beauty somewhere on the internet a while ago. N4096 NOW THAT JUST DOESN'T LOOK LIKE ANY FUN AT ALL!
  4. Note: For Optimal Reading Clarity, "CLICK" On Page to View Content Then "CLICK" on Magnifying Glass to Zoom in.
  5. FLYING Magazine Dec 1948 Al Mooney only marketed the plane as the "M-18/M-18L/M-18LA/M-18C/M-18 C55" other than the 1953 models that were marketed as the "Wee Scotsman" to promote the aircraft's low operating costs. "MITE" was a nickname used by Max Karant submitting a pilot report for Dec. 1948 Flying Magazine. The name stuck right up until it became official on Jan 28, 1999 (US DOT N 7110.183). A very popular spray plane with the M-18 designator replaced the Mooney M-18 designation and the M-18 officially became designated "Mooney Mite" as far as the US Department of Transportation FAA, ICAO, NAV CANADA and Eurocontrol are concerned. Note: FOR OPTIMAL VIEWING CLARITY . . "CLICK" ON PICTURE THEN "CLICK" TO ZOOM FULL ARTICLE ON THIS SITE - M18 PILOT REPORT DECEMBER 1948 "FLYING MAGAZINE"
  6. Looked for a Mickey Mantle in the drawer with no luck, but turned up what appears to be another TOPPS Trading Card. This is the TOPPS JETS SERIES. "Mite" is in quotation marks because Al Mooney only marketed the plane as the "M-18L/LA/C/C55" other than the 1953 models that were marketed as the "Wee Scotsman" to promote the aircraft's low operating costs. "MITE" was a nickname used by an airplane magazine contributor submitting a flight review. The name stuck right up until it became official on Jan 28, 1999 (US DOT N 7110.183). A very popular spray plane with the M-18 designator replaced the Mooney M-18 designation and the M-18 officially became designated "Mooney Mite" as far as the US Department of Transportation FAA, ICAO, NAV CANADA and Eurocontrol are concerned.
  7. "FRIEND OR FOE" Early 1950's Topps Trading Cards (200 Total Set). This set of trading cards had a painted depiction of an airplane (based on aircraft photographs provided by New York Herald Tribune) on one side and a "Friend or Foe" Quiz" on the opposite side, Condensed specifications were also included on the opposite side. This card is of the lighter weight Lycoming powered M-18L model. (Later M-18C models were Continental A65 powered with 850lbs gross weight and max cruise of 143mph).
  8. Seems like checklists provide our only reliable safety net, however it relies on us aviators to remember to initiate and perform the checklist. Al Mooney increased gear position awareness (after his gear up landing in the M-18) through the introduction of the Wig Wag device. In addition, 1953 and later M-18 models had a round window covered in plexiglass on the nose wheel "bump". If the Wig Wag didn't catch your attention, you were supposed to look between your legs to visually check actual gear position visible through the window on the nose wheel well. None of it works without performing the task. "G_U_M_P" also works great if you remember to do it! The best I have seen is the toggle switch checklist now sold by Missionary Bush Pilot. This device mounts on top of the dash with Velcro, and allows you to toggle "UP" through the checklist as you complete pre-takeoff to cruise phases of checks, and toggle "DOWN" as you complete each pre-landing check. He will make custom units for all makes and models of aircraft. It is difficult to forget to perform your checklists when you can't avoid seeing the unit when looking out the windshield. Alas, the Mooney Mite didn't come with a dash to mount one on. G_U_M_P ! ! ! NB: You can see this device in use by viewing "Missionary Bush Pilot" videos on YouTube. Ryan (the host), pilots a Kodiak through the remotely settled regions of Papua New Guinea. Great scenery and a good source of watching cockpit management skills in action.
  9. The above brochure shows the 1st production M-18 model (which used the Crosley automobile engine and a 3 belt drive reduction unit). This M-18 had the P-51 style belly mounted radiator. The take-off and climb performance was marginal and the M-18 suffered from powerplant reliability using the auto engine conversion. Although eleven of these were sent to aircraft distributors across the United States, all were returned to Mooney to receive the Lycoming 0-145 upgrade (more than doubling the little single place airplane's horsepower). Altitude, range, and speed records for production aircraft of this weight class were achieved as a result of this upgrade. This was the start of Mooney's attention grabbing fame. Speed records continue to fall with the Mooney M-20 aircraft based on this design. Shown below is the M-18 prototype. (It used a 4 belt drive reduction unit and had a forward mounted radiator).
  10. Here's Mooney's advertised specifications for the M-18LA and M-18C
  11. Still not fast enough? With Mooney's clean lines, all that's required to boost cruise numbers appears to be horsepower. Consider the Mooney Mite's performance with 85-90Hp. 85Hp M-18's are reported to have economy cruise speeds of 145mph while the 90Hp M-19 was reported to cruise at 150mph. Not bad for a 1946 design! Not the 2mph per horsepower (@75% and optimum altitude) of the 65Hp models but quite impressive just the same.
  12. Actually, when Al Mooney sold "Mooney", the new owners of the company purchased "Mooney" conditionally upon the inclusion of a 4 place aircraft design based on the M-18. After the start of the M20 production, "Mooney" stopped production of the M18. After many years with no Mooney single seat aircraft being made, The Mooney Mite Aircraft Corporation bought the plans from the owners of "Mooney" with the intent of making the plane available again via the Experimental market. These plans are now in the hands of the Smithsonian. PS. If you hover over my thumbnail photo, you will see the aircraft in the left bank is not an M20. They are so similar that with the Faux window on the M-18X, you will only differentiate between airborne models by the sound of the engine.
  13. Here's one listing of plans/prints/manuals etc. for the Experimental Mooney M-18X that was available in the early 1970's. This ad was inserted in the Mooney Mites Owner's Association quarterly bulletin (April - July 1972). Mooney Mite Aircraft Corporation sold copies of original drawings of the Certified Mooney M-18. These drawings are of the Lycoming 0145 Powered M-18L (780lbs Gr Wt)
  14. I also have the "F" model Continental. Gives you the option of a variable pitch propeller with the "flanged" shaft. Just a note regarding the Lycoming 0-145 models in the Mooney M18, I believe they were a bed-mount installation. I might be wrong, but heard it from a reliable "Mooniac". Regards, Kevin
  15. Sorry for the delay in replying to this post (notification setting issues - my bad). This manual was from Mooney Mite Aircraft Corporation 1970. It contains information relevant to the Mooney M18 (the owner of the company purchased the M-18 design and made the aircraft available to the public as a homebuilt design). I have a copy but no longer have the full set of prints. I believe copies are still available on the "Mite Site". Regards, Kevin
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