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squeaky.stow

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About squeaky.stow

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Barrie ON, Canada CNV8
  • Reg #
    CGKRP
  • Model
    M20K 252TSE

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  1. I guess it is time I deleted that post. Or maybe I should leave it to remind me of the dangers of blathering about a topic which I don’t know that much about. I have learned a great deal about scuba diving on Mooneyspace in the past couple of months!
  2. I guess it comes down to how important you think a stabilized approach is in a light GA airplane. For big jets, it is critical. For a Mooney, maybe not so much. Selecting flaps below 200 feet is probably very possible to do safely in a Mooney, but it is definitely not a stabilized approach by any definition. I have spent so long being in a big jet mindset, that is the way I fly my Mooney. Every time I start flying it like a little airplane I seem to do something dumb, so I go back to conservative SOPs and checklists and get slightly less dumb - or rather those SOPs and checklists help to prote
  3. @pkofman for what this is worth, your SOP is similar to what is done in the airline world. Most airlines have a Stable Approach policy that requires that you be fully configured for landing by 1000’ AGL. Some have a lower altitude for VMC but this is becoming more rare as Stable Approach guidance evolves. Many big airport arrival controllers will specify a minimum speed to the FAF so the net result is that final configuration starts as we pass the FAF to be fully configured by 1000’ on a stable approach. That means stable in configuration, speed, sink rate, thrust, and lateral and vertical al
  4. Too much drag for what? My bigger concern in the event of an engine failure would be too little thrust! ;-) But seriously, I can see that being a consideration in a multi-engine (perhaps he teaches on light twins as well?) but in a single, you ain’t making the runway with an engine failure from a 3 degree slope unless you are very close in, so either way you are landing off-field. Perhaps delaying the full flaps might stretch your glide a bit but at the FAF you are only about 1500 feet AGL so you don’t have much time.
  5. Just got this from Sandia Tech Support I was a couple of weeks from installation. “The FAA has issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive # 2020-18-51 on the SAI 340 A P/N 306171-20 and the Bendix/King KI 300 P/N 306171-10. Sandia is currently working on a solution to this issue. When one is found units will be updated at no charge. In the meantime, all SAI 340Astandby attitude indicators should be placarded FOR DAY TIME VFR USE ONLY. At this time we do not have a schedule for the fix but will post updates on our web site at www.sandia.aero. We sincerely apologize for this inc
  6. Not yet, due to the requirement to have two people to do that check, one of whom will have to trust the other one a lot. ;-) If I do this test and see lower voltage at the battery, isn’t that telling me that I have a wiring or grounding problem? I can see it being either the same or lower than the battery bus but in either case it seems to me that I will still need to get the VRs adjusted.
  7. Meter clip attached to main battery bus as per the SMM. 2000 rpm, no electrical load. Both on 29.15V Shaft drive only 29.17V Belt drive only 29.14V
  8. AB takeoffs are (or were in my day) SOP unless you were really trying to conserve fuel, say on a cross country where you were trying to stretch the range. The airplane can do a Mil power (no afterburner) takeoff in most configurations but it uses a lot more runway. If you were operating at heavier weights with a lot of bombs and external tanks, it wasn’t even possible. Plus it is fun to make the sound of freedom!
  9. The bad news for me is that I just bought a used Sandia 340A to replace my old RC Allen standby A/I. The good news is I haven’t installed it yet, so I am only out the purchase price.
  10. Thanks Clarance, Is there an easy place to put a meter clip on the bus? I could find anything obvious so I used the cigarette lighter because it comes right off the battery bus I believe. I suspected the JPI might be a little unreliable but I was surprised to see it off by .3V
  11. I stand corrected. Just checked the logbook. We got there in Dec 89 so our first summer would have been 1990. Wow. Hard to believe that is 30 years ago! Luke didn’t even have shade hangars back then.
  12. If checking each VR individually means turning one alternator off and then the other, I get 29.2 for both of them. Or do I need to unplug the VRs one at a time? Batteries are not cheap so I don’t want to cook it. I will pull them both at annual and send them out for recalibration. Too bad that can’t be done in-house like the Electrodelta VRs. Any idea what Consolac will charge for that?
  13. I remember that week! It was actually 1989. My wife and I had arrived at Luke AFB that January for my foreign exchange tour with the USAF and we thought we were in paradise. We left Cold Lake Alberta in -40C. Early July when it hit 122 I though it was a novel experience and was kinda enjoying it. I had just heard on the radio that Southwest had Cancelled had ceased all departures from Sky Harbour until Boeing could come up with new WAT charts because they were not allowed to extrapolate beyond the limits of the existing charts. Then I went out to my car to drive home. I couldn’t open t
  14. Reviving an old thread probably wasn’t the best way to post this question so I will start a new thread. A couple of questions for @kortopates and anyone else with experience in this. I have two of the Mooney 800270-501 28v voltage regulators in my 252. My JPI typically indicates about 28.9V with either or both alternators on at 2000 RPM. When I put a meter on the cigarette lighter I get 29.2V. For my serial number, the aircraft may have either Electrodelta or Mooney VRs. The Service and Maintenance Manual says that for aircraft with Electrodelta VRs they should be field adjusted to
  15. Reviving this thread with a couple of questions for @kortopates and anyone else with experience in this. I have two of the Mooney 800270-501 28v voltage regulators in my 252. My JPI typically indicates about 28.9V with either or both alternators on at 2000 RPM. When I put a meter on the cigarette lighter I get 29.2V. For my serial number, the aircraft may have either Electrodelta or Mooney VRs. The Service and Maintenance Manual says that for aircraft with Electrodelta VRs they should be field adjusted to 28.6 - 28.8V while the Mooney regulators should be putting out 28.3 +.2/-0 but “No
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