jaylw314

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jaylw314 last won the day on January 19

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About jaylw314

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    KCVO, Oregon
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  1. You also want to practice ahead of time, because mentally it can be challenging to start the business in an unfamiliar environment and position. You certainly don't want to wait until your bladder is near exploding!
  2. They're actually pretty effective, they pretty much instantly soak up any fluid and prevent it from spilling. Positioning it and your pelvis is a little tricky while seated, though, doubly so for women.
  3. Approach should be aware of someone else on an IFR approach, and might know about someone on a VFR approach. Tower may have absolutely no idea, since the FAF is usually outside of there usual controlled airspace. If anything, approach is going to have a much better situational awareness than the tower controller, since the tower guy is unlikely to have any radar info at hand. That may change as ADS-B progresses.
  4. Ouch, what the heck do you do if you damage your plane in the middle of nowhere like that?
  5. I don't know if I'd call that a "slam dunk" unless your speeds are much faster in a baron. On the RNAV 21 approach to KSMO, the MVA in the vectoring area is 6000' MSL, and the glideslope intercept is at 3000' MSL. They'll frequently vector you 2 nm outside the FAF and tell you you're cleared for the approach when established
  6. I just hate slamming on the brakes, so 800 meters about the minimum I can do. I'm one of those annoying people that rolls out to the very end of the runway
  7. Here you go: https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/18/us/alaska-plane-crash/index.html
  8. Apropos to the topic of aviation, I'd point out that the FAA and NTSB together have produced a safety culture in commercial aviation that has no parallel in the private sector. This week there was a regional jet that slid off the runway and killed one person. He was only the second person in 10 years to be killed in an accident on a scheduled US flight. I recall when the discussion to privatize ATC came up, few here were on that bandwagon, and the AOPA certainly isn't. Compare that to health care, where human error contributes to or causes 250,000 deaths per year, and where arguments about privatization and socialism go back and forth ad nauseum? One thing that seems clear to me about human nature--when you need to produce a safety culture, the government must be involved. Efforts to produce that culture in health care through private errors efforts (wow, that was a Freudian slip) have not demonstrated anywhere near the level of success that we have seen in commercial aviation. If the power utility industry needs to develop a safety culture, I don't think it will happen without some type of state intervention. The public outcry will not be sufficient, and they will simply pass the costs of lawsuits to their customers because that's the way capitalism works. Oh, that's right, it's not capitalism because there's no competition...
  9. I thought the detuning of the counterweights was the whole reason for the RPM limitation on the IO-360/McCauley combo?
  10. You need WAY more cleco's I checked the MM's, there are no callouts for rivet lengths in the airframe sections as far as I could see.
  11. I had some problems with a cold start when it was about 40 degF out last week. My wife has been taking flying lessons, so I took the time to point out that batteries don't put out as much current when they're cold. Then I realized the throttle had been all the way closed for some reason. When I opened it a little and tried again it started on the first turn. I felt a little embarrassed.
  12. I noticed on the uAvionix site that they seem to have changed the wording on the expected autopilot integration: "Autopilot integration will be accomplished in a phased approach. The initial autopilot support will be for STEC systems (which have their own roll/pitch source) and allow the heading bug on the AV-30 to drive the heading datum input on the autopilot. This interface will be accomplished with the APA-MINI converter. Follow on autopilot integration will occur over time, with most likely the Century systems first. These interfaces provide roll and pitch, in addition to the heading datum, to the autopilot. This interface is accomplished with the APA-10 converter. The APA-10 converter also provides ARINC 429 interface capability, which allows full vertical and lateral deviations from a digital navigational radio to be displayed. The AV-30 display component is provisioned for these interfaces, but will require a software update with the applicable autopilot adapter becomes available." That's a glaring omission of BK autopilots.
  13. In theory, the pistons would only resist the crankshaft during the compression stroke. Since a radial has 7 or 9 cylinders (usually), that means 7 or 9 compression strokes every 2 rotations on the crankshaft journal In our non-radial motors, every journal has one piston only, so there would be only one compression stroke every 2 rotations.
  14. Wasn't that another argument from Mike Busch, that the whole "prop driving engine is bad" is another OWT? IIRC, the idea came from radials, where the main crankshaft journal will be pushed from the compression cycles of each cylinder from the side opposite the oil hole 7 or 9 times in 2 rotations, whereas our typical motors each crankshaft journal will only be pushed from the wrong side once every 2 rotations. He also referenced some accidents where people crashed because they were trying not to reduce MP because of this idea...