tspear

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About tspear

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  1. tspear

    Possibly moving to Maryland or Virginia

    I grew up in the DC Area and lived there till 2012. I mostly lived in the Maryland suburbs, but did live briefly in northern VA; since I am in the computer space I did a lot of work in and around the whole area. In general, traffic sucks bad for the whole region. If you live out towards Martin State like suggested earlier in the thread, rush hour commute to downtown DC will be measured in hours, one way. So I would suggest you look much closer at where and how your schedule will work. As an example, I used to work in Tysons Corner VA, and live in Germantown MS. 27 miles door to door. Miss rush, and you could do it in 30 minutes, hit traffic wrong and it was an hour and half. If you have flexibility, you can consider looking further out and take the commuter rail lines in. Tim
  2. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    Could be, I am not an MBA. :-D Tim
  3. tspear

    GPU Mishap

    That would be funny to watch. Ever think of trying for Circ Du Solei? Tim (could not resist)
  4. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    Back-sourcing is bring something back which was out-sourced. In-sourcing is the generic to bring a function into the company which was not previously done by the company. Recent example is Tesla and the auto-pilot. They originally bought a third party system and then brought it in house; effectively in-sourcing. Near-shoring is moving a function back near a primary location; usually within the same country and withing a few time-zones. Off-shoring is moving a function to another country, usually driven by cost. Most people use in-sourcing and back-sourcing interchangeably. Only an MBA would actually care about the difference. Tim (not an MBA, but I have worked with enough of them)
  5. tspear

    GPU Mishap

    Curious, why would you consider jumping the plane and flying? Especially if there is potential bad weather? I would pull the battery, charge it and make sure it holds a charge before I consider flying with a questionable battery. I have had electrical failures in flight, and running on battery was not pleasant. I would not want to think how bad it could have been if my battery was questionable. And lead acid batteries, when you drain them fully are often wrecked... Tim
  6. tspear

    Cleaning the engine

    It allowed me to identify a new oil leak was in the bottom part of the case, and was not being burned off, sent out a breather hose... Tim Sent from my LG-TP260 using Tapatalk
  7. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    Not in a Mooney, but I resemble that remark in my last plane..... And to think I am contemplating it again.... Tim
  8. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    No, I am pretty sure common sense died even further back in history. Tim
  9. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    Well, actually it depends on the kind of tea. This is going on memory: Black actually the water should be "boiling" which means it is close to 210 with a little residual hitting the magical boiling point temp. Green tea should be close to 190. White tea is close to 170. All of which comes back to the old lesson; black tea to bring to the kettle, green tea you bring the kettle to the tea, white tea you bring the kettle to serving tray and pour there. Coffee has the same kinds of rules, but since I do not drink coffee, I do not know them. Tim
  10. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    The problem is the cost of defense ads to the bill for everyone. Not only is the prosecution spending money, so is the defense. Tim
  11. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    Kinda funny, a thread started on POA about lawsuits: https://www.pilotsofamerica.com/community/threads/stella-awards.111529/ Tim
  12. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    Actually, I did read the published case documents when it was in court, but not the appeal. I have a lot of lawyers and teachers in the extended family and it was a regular discussion topic. Tim
  13. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    So the consumer cannot read "hot coffee"? The super hot coffee was a selling point of McDonald's. This is just a simple case people blaming others for their mistakes. Now if McDonald's put super hot coffee in a paper cup with a little wax and the cup disintegrates, you may have a claim. But blaming the company because you got what you paid for is the ultimate in accountability shifting. And this is a symptom and the whole nanny state / helicopter parenting that has infected the civil system, and put many industries out of business or dam close (GA being one of them). Tim
  14. tspear

    lawsuit in Philly

    My grandmother who is a hundred said anyone who makes it to 80 better know coffee is hot. No it was not overheated. Straight from the percolator coffee is just under boiling. The fundamental problem is we now have a belief that someone else is to blame, and our civil system has enshrined the concept that someone else is responsible for our mistakes and for managing/elimination of our risks. Cap lawyer fees on these cases to a multiple of minimum wage, make all pain/suffering and enhancements go to charity. Then you will see how many rituous cases you have. Tim Sent from my LG-TP260 using Tapatalk