cctsurf

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About cctsurf

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    n6428U
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    M20C

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  1. I find it interesting that a number of you are saying that the parking brake is not solid. Mine is amazingly so. I can run up to full power and not move... I wonder what the difference is.
  2. I wonder if your engine oil is really getting hot enough in your flights... 1.2 hours should be enough, but if the oil temp doesn't get above about 180 (preferably higher, like 220), it won't evaporate off the moisture and it WILL contribute to corrosion. Do you have an oil-air separator on the engine? One of the downfalls to these is that they don't distinguish between fluids. They will not easily allow the moisture to exit but instead return it to the engine. Mike Busch advises against them... I just try to make certain that I get the temp high enough to boil off the moisture. I usually don't have the cool problem on my Mooney, it's usually too hot... I do have this problem on my Cherokee.
  3. If there's lots of blowing sand, I don't think it is that great of an idea. There's a big hole there where the step retracts. I wouldn't want to have sand in my empenage. I think a better idea would be just to leave the step up unless someone you are flying needs it (or perhaps you do). The Mooney wing is so low that it really doesn't need a step. I know a number on here have removed fixed steps for the speed increase. As to getting a replacement step, I'm thinking it should fall under a minor mod if your A&P will sign it off. The variation is within the type certificate of the same model. My concern would be that you have to have structure to which to attach the replacement step. My expectation is that structure right now is a hole... Gonna have to fill that.
  4. Mike Busch calmed me down immensely after listening to his webinar about finding metal in the filter. There are good procedures to deal with this, it can usually be diagnosed without a tear down, fairly economically.
  5. My sentiments exactly, however, you would need an A&P to sign it off... Shouldn't be that big a deal. Aircraft Spruce's website states "Used as original equipment in Beech, Cessna and Piper aircraft."
  6. I would say that it is definitely the engine drooping on the mounts. You will either need to shim it up (according to LASAR's specifications) or replace the motor mounts or both. BTW, getting your engine square with the world is a great speed mod, it adds a couple of mph and no STC required. Right now your engine is pulling you down, not a good thing for an airplane that is supposed to be going up.
  7. You keep mentioning that your mechanic does the mechanic work for the NH state police to me that is part of the issue, he may have champagne taste, it seems you have a beer budget. The state police have a much larger budget than anyone on mooneyspace, or we would probably be flying something even more fun (tbm, pc12, citation? ). As has been mentioned a number of times, other mechanics may have more experience with this particular problem and may be able to point you to cheaper solutions. We're not telling you that he is bad, we're telling you to look for solutions outside of his box. I think a number of great contacts have been mentioned that may be able to help you find those solutions. A fuel system cleanout should not be that big of a deal, especially when adding a ferry tank as a source of clean fuel. He has already cleaned out the input screen on the carb, it's just the gascolator, pumps and hoses behind that... A couple of A&P hours at most... I am really sorry to hear of your trouble, I truly hope that you can get this resolved quickly and as economically as possible. I hate to hear about a fellow pilot grounded!
  8. Check with acpartswhse, not long ago, I was interested in a conversion kit and he said that he has a plane with the kit in it. He offered that I could park next to it and move the kit to my plane... I didn't end up going that direction, so I'm assuming that he still has it.
  9. I think it has been advised elsewhere, but I would definitely look at a ferry tank, it would allow your mechanic to run up the engine, etc. as he desires. It would allow you to get your plane to a shop which can also take care of the tank reseal or the bladder install. While I don't distrust that your mechanic is trying to do the best by you, I have to wonder about the AD's being determined to not be done when the prebuy mechanic didn't find that. I highly recommend speaking to Mike Busch www.savvyaviation.com! As I understand it, he likes to help people out of these pickles. I think Mike might be able to point you in better directions than we have here on mooneyspace.
  10. I think there is a way in which you fold a bill so it looks like a swan, I bet a bit of adjustment and it could look like the mooney bird... Best looking mooney bird around ('though I'm still partial to the older one from the early '60's mooneys)
  11. I'd wager less if you get it at Oshkosh...or possibly Sun 'n fun
  12. I'm not talking hangar fairies, I'm talking about how much of our planes came straight off of cars (door handles, alternators, gas tank vent valves--out of a holley carburetor, and those are just a few things I have personally dealt with) or off of the shelf and yet the parts must first be blessed by the oem many of which haven't "manufactured" one (by which I mean, put a sticker on one from an auto parts store) in years. I know that's not true of Brittain, but as geoffb said, They know that the tubing manufactured for windshield wipers is adequate for their system, why have to touch every piece of tubing, charge extra for it, and waste their time?
  13. I love aircraft parts companies that take a real-world attitude toward parts and don't expect you to purchase the same thing from them with a blessing from the pope, the faa and themselves...
  14. Apparently, while this is the old way the POHs and our instructors taught us, it is the hardest way on the engine to run it. It runs the pressures within the cylinders as high as we can possibly make them (as tested on highly instrumented cylinders), shortening cylinder lives. The even older method of leaning is actually better, leaning until roughness and then enrichen just to the point of smooth operation. This method will provide a slightly lean of peak operation on the o-360's and io-360s in these antique Mooneys we fly. The cocked throttle can be helpful for mixture distribution, 'though it is not as necessary on these engines as say the o-470 which has notoriously bad mixture distribution. We must also be careful to avoid seeking after that peak egt as carefully as I often have. Running close to peak egt (as in looking for it) brings with it the almost certainty of detonation above moderate power settings. Detonation destroys engines quickly, as in minutes... Again, all of this is from Mike Busch's webinars, excellent information and confirmation of our attitudes for us CBs:
  15. ALWAYS take off with full rich, you are risking detonation by taking off without full rich mixture unless you are above 3,000 ft density altitude. Lycoming now says to lean to best power mixture for ground operations, including run up. Mike Busch has an excellent webinar on leaning (actually 2, there is an advanced leaning webinar as well). https://youtu.be/_VfiPuheeGw