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Aerodon

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Looking for a 252 to replace Seneca
  • Reg #
    N4167Z
  • Model
    PA18, C172, PA34

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  1. and tell your insurance company about it, they are better at dealing with third parties than you are. Don
  2. No, just add the transducers and you have an 830. I have transducers and harnesses in stock, send me an email, don supercub180@gmail.com
  3. Yes, the vacuum pipe from the rear standby vacuum pump is perfect for threading all the wires through from the back. If you installed an engine monitor, they may have used the hole through the firewall for that. That would be a real pain to redo those wires. I would reinstall the engine vacuum pump, the hose through the firewall (even if it means a new hole), the regulator, the gauge etc. Note that vacuum is needed to extend the brakes, a spring retracts them. But I still would not use an electric standby. And I would not give up the vacuum brakes unless really necessary. Aerodon
  4. I agree, thats why I pick my subcontractors more on ability to do the work properly than the price.
  5. So I had an excavator operator hit a gas line 5 minutes after I told him exactly where it was. There was a sorry, but nothing more than that. Cost me $3k, and I was the client not the contractor. Think of how many flat screen TV's that is. Aerodon
  6. OK, I have yet to get a clear answer on this. In a 'normal' system, there is flow through the instruments to the vacuum pump, and the vacuum is regulated by letting in more air through the regulator. If you block off the instruments, then all the flow goes though a regulator. Can it cope? Or should one install a 'bleed valve' with a filter to simulate the instrument flow? These bleed valves are commonly used on venturis to set the vacuum and not expensive. Inline filters keep the air clean so you don't mess up the vacuum pump. And yes, not too difficult to reinstall the vacuum parts for the speedbrakes, and I plan on keeping mine working as long as possible rather than replace. Vacuum pump, manifold, regulator. Aerodon
  7. No I haven't finished the install. Yes I have manuals for you - send me an email supercub180@gmail.com No the G500 has no grey code output, at best the Garmin equipment has a serial altitude (no use) and a baro correction. My plan is to keep a blind encoder for the KFC150, and use the GI-275 or GAD43e for the baro correction. I will have 3 'altitude sources' in the plane - ADC74 airdata (master), GI-275 and the blind encoder. My KAS297 already does not capture the correct altitude, took me a while to work out that it does work, but captures 300 feet high. And there is a blind encoder, I suspect that was installed to make the GPS and transponder accurate, and there is an error in the KEA130. Aerodon
  8. I sent mine to AWI a couple of years ago, was about $3k if I recall correctly.
  9. I have a spare 28V electric standby pump if anyone is looking to install. I'll have to look at the parts manual, I think you need a different vacuum manifold too, Aerodon
  10. Paul, I thought it was the other way around, they don't work on turbo planes, do work on normally aspirated. You need to reduce the manifold pressure to 5" below the ambient, so at sea level quite easy to do, at 10,000 feet not so easy. Aerodon
  11. I'm curious, what did the engine logs show that is not going to be fixed at the overhaul? Aerodon
  12. I don't think it is that easy, you need to know exactly where full is on the filler neck. Its easy to squeeze an extra 1-3G's in, and then you don't know if you low fuel is 1G or 4? I think it also important to know that the low level is calibrated in the annunciator panel, so there could be a variation from plane to plane, and year to year. And not work at all? For my own peace of mind, I would fly one tank to 'light on' and then drain the remaining fuel to know for sure. And then fill to the filler neck bottom, filler neck top, to know that for sure. But I'm one of those guys that is quite prepared to fly to 10G remaining, so need to know gauges, warning lights, JPI accuracy, and proper 'full'. Aerodon
  13. I have a complete spare exhaust. email coming. Aerodon
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