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Deb

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Deb last won the day on November 13 2019

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  1. Apparently there’s a bit more to the story (from Avweb dated April 23) https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/bridge-stunt-leads-to-ads-b-revocation/: But a coincidental malfunction of her Cessna 180’s transponder with ADS-B-Out may have resulted in her being slapped with an emergency revocation of all her certificates instead of the suspension that normally accompanies such transgressions. Lunken said that after she’d crossed flying under a bridge from her bucket list she headed home and checked in with Cincinnati Approach and was told her transponder was off. She said she reset it and set a new code and it resumed working. In their subsequent investigation, FAA officials determined that she’d shut it off on purpose to stop the system from tracking her while she threw caution to the wind. Lunken, a longtime former FAA safety inspector and veteran flight instructor, vehemently denies the charge. “I know what I did in that cockpit and I did not turn it off,” she said. The agency used a new section of its Legal Enforcement Actions guidebook for FAA staff, which calls for revocation of a certificate for “operating an aircraft without activated transponder or ADS-B Out transmission (except as provided in 14 C.F.R. § 91.225(f)) for purposes of evading detection.” The section was added in a package of other amendments in January of 2020, just after ADS-B became mandatory in most controlled airspace and about two months before Lunken’s flight of fancy. The section is on page 9-14 at the bottom. Lunken said she took the 180 to her avionics tech, who said the transponder seemed to be loose in its mount when he took it out. It tested fine on the bench and after it was re-installed. The FAA interviewed the tech. Lunken said the tech was unable to tell them whether the device was malfunctioning during the flight. She said now it’s her word against the FAA’s on whether the intermittent ADS-B Out signal was a malfunction or a crime. She said radar tracks that were part of the evidence against her showed the ADS-B signal from her aircraft to be intermittent. She speculates she jarred the connections loose during a few bone-jarring landings in gusty crosswinds. “I had made several rather brutal landings at OH77 (the 32’ wide, concrete, crosswind strip just north of the bridge) and it was bumpy at low levels,” she said. “I did not turn it off.” In addition to the article @Hanklinked (https://www.flyingmag.com/unusual-attitudes-no-excuses-screw-up/), two months later Martha detailed the events leading to the loss of her DPE here https://www.flyingmag.com/unusual-attitudes-another-screw-up/.
  2. It would appear as if at least one person from Mooney is an avid Mooneyspace follower !
  3. Patrick (@patrickf) created an app for the Ovation which does exactly what you’re asking for. It’s a real tour de force. Here’s a link to the thread: https://mooneyspace.com/topic/27815-ovation-performance-charts-in-xl/?tab=comments#comment-458890 and a link to the app: https://oaa.app.link/Wbv8GfTJ6Q. This link might require the app Open as App.
  4. We just spoke with Shana at Mooney and she said that Mooney was in between website providers.
  5. This might be “clickbait.” From the site: THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT AND NOT AN ACTUAL NEWS ARTICLE, BLOG, OR CONSUMER PROTECTION UPDATE THE STORY DEPICTED ON THIS SITE AND THE PERSON DEPICTED IN THE STORY ARE NOT ACTUAL NEWS. RATHER, THIS STORY IS BASED ON THE RESULTS THAT SOME PEOPLE WHO HAVE USED THESE PRODUCTS HAVE ACHIEVED. THE RESULTS PORTRAYED IN THE STORY AND IN THE COMMENTS ARE ILLUSTRATIVE, AND MAY NOT BE THE RESULTS THAT YOU ACHIEVE WITH THESE PRODUCTS. THIS PAGE COULD RECEIVE COMPENSATION FOR CLICKS ON OR PURCHASE OF PRODUCTS FEATURED ON THIS SITE.
  6. From https://www.aviationconsumer.com/uncategorized/ppl-training-courses-sportys-mzeroa-top/: An Easy Win Of the courses we reviewed, our top pick is the $199 Sporty’s Learn to Fly Course. Its content is engaging, intuitive, highly portable and provides the greatest number of study options for all aspects of initial training. MzeroA gets an honorable mention for its unique approach to learning, its robust content and its interactive style.
  7. From Section II Limitations of the Ovation 2 GX AFM (original release 12-11-07): FUEL LIMITATIONS -WARNING- Takeoff maneuvers when the selected fuel tank contains less than 12 gallons (45.4 liters) of fuel have not been demonstrated.
  8. From http://concordebattery.com/otherpdf/5-0324-rg-manual.pdf:
  9. Hey Dave, the NTSB report came in on the Michael Graver incident. No surprise, they ruled it spacial disorientation. Toxicology came back normal as well as aircraft systems that were able to be tested.

    These type of incidents hurt because he had so much experience in actual conditions

    https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20180915X23852.

     

  10. Question 1 is an interesting one: 14CFR61.129 (a) (4) starts: (4) Ten hours of solo flight time in a single engine airplane or 10 hours of flight time performing the duties of pilot in command in a single engine airplane with an authorized instructor on board... and 14CFR61.129 (a) (4) (ii) states: (ii) 5 hours in night VFR conditions with 10 takeoffs and 10 landings (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower. The FAA doesn’t define “performing the duties of pilot in command with an authorized instructor on board” per se. There is an FAA legal interpretation of 61.129 which states in part https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/agc/practice_areas/regulations/interpretations/data/interps/2014/kuhn - (2014) legal interpretation.pdf: The second question concerns how the pilot performing the duties of PIC with an authorized instructor may log flight time. Because this flight time is a substitute for solo flight time, the pilot is not receiving instruction and therefore cannot log this time as dual instruction received. The pilot can log the time to meet the requirements of § 61.129(a)(4) and log total flight time. Section 61.51 (e) prescribes the requirements for logging PIC time. The pilot could log PIC time under § 61.51(e)(l)(i) if the pilot has a private pilot certificate with the appropriate ratings for the aircraft. Otherwise, the pilot cannot log PIC time. The question answered appears to be the corollary to the one posed by Adam (@avwilson52). Flight time with an authorized instructor as a substitute for solo flight time can’t be logged as dual instruction. This implies (although not specifically states) that flight time logged as dual instruction given can’t be used as a substitute for solo flight (with an instructor). Mark (@midlifeflyer) has expertise with this and can provide a more complete answer. Solo time logged during private pilot training can be used towards the commercial requirements as applicable. Note the requirement for 10 night takeoffs and landings (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower. Question 2: Short answer, if you have an instrument rating that qualifies. Question 3: 14CFR61.129 (a) (3) starts: (3) 20 hours of training on the areas of operation listed in § 61.127(b)(1) of this part that includes at least— and 14CFR61.129 (a) (3) (iv) states: (iv) One 2-hour cross country flight in a single engine airplane in nighttime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure; Taken together, the night flight must have been with an instructor, lasted longer than 2 hours and more than 100 nm total straight line distance from the original point of departure. If your private training had a flight like that, you can use it. Extra question: A cross country lasts as long as it lasts – a day, week, month, whatever. So a trip from GA to the Bahamas with a week vacation there counts, as long as it meets the other requirements.
  11. We stayed in town; Eric and Paul graciously provided us the use of a car. We live in south Florida; it’s a testament to the experience, their expertise and hospitality that we’ll be going there again for our annual. At our first annual, they found an unrecognized issue that had been missed by several visits to at least two other MSCs.
  12. We’ve had good experiences with Eric and Paul at Oasis Aviation (Weep No More) in Wilmar, MN. They are a Mooney Service Center, very knowledgeable and great guys. They’ve encouraged us to participate (get in their way?) as much as we’ve wanted, and have taught us tons about our Mooney. We’d highly recommend going out there.
  13. Well, it seems as if we have the Lavazza “backup espresso machine model.” It’s 15 bar pressure and uses Lavazza Crema e Aroma cartridges.
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