M20Doc

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M20Doc last won the day on January 6

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About M20Doc

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
  • Interests
    Flying, maintaining, and restoring airplanes
  • Reg #
    C-GMYT
  • Model
    M-18

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  1. Hank, Prop balance with the spinner removed seems odd? Normally they are installed during the balancing and indexed for future reference. Clarence
  2. In some cases the outer cable slips in its clamps, causing a loss of travel and lower RPM. With the cowls open wiggle the outer cable to see if it's secure. Clarence
  3. I can't imagine that the sealant will all fall off in one ferry flight, turning you into a flaming comet or causing an engine failure. I would question if at the last Annual the screens were even cleaned. Since you've owned it you've put on 40 odd hours and about 400 gallons of fuel and this is the first time you're checking the fuel system I'd be sure to clean the gascolator and screen, (be sure SB M20-200 is done), drain the carburetor bowl, clean the carburetor finger screen and sump the tanks into a clean glass jar to see what you've really got. Replace your fuel cap O rings per SB M20-229A. Then run the plane for an hour or two, then recheck the gascolator screen, once you see what's in the gascolator you can make a decision about a ferry flight for a strip and reveal or bladders. Without some proper diagnosis, your maintainer is only guessing at the severity of the sealant decay. Clarence
  4. Here is the SB in question. http://www.mooney.com/en/sb/M20-200.pdf Clarence Edit, Has anyone ever installed a Helicoil to repair the stripped thread?
  5. You probably have dangerous fuel lines running under the floor as well, I'd remove them. Clarence
  6. All of those incorrect length screws add a bunch of extra time on the end of a screwdriver. Clarence
  7. Bob, Typical wing panel screws are AN 507-832R7' this is a non structural 8-32 thread, Phillips drive 7/16" long, cadmium plated. The stainless steel version is AN 507C832R7. I remember from school being told the cadmium imparted some lubricating qualities. this may be the difference and explain why the stainless screws bind at times. Clarence
  8. I had a Mooney customer who passed his last instrument re ride at age 89, he was healthy in mind and body, and was still active in his business. He told me that he would not do his next instrument re ride at age 91 and would sell the Mooney. Sadly, he was right. On a trip through the the U.S. in his Mooney at age 90, he was killed while crossing the street between the hotel and restaurant. He told me being active kept him young. Clarence
  9. Many years ago a friend was lost on a flight from Vancouver Island to Calgary. ELT was heard for a short time but no wreckage was ever located, many hours spent by SAR, both military and private to no avail. 12 years later a hiker found the wreckage and remains, bringing closure for his family. A better ELT and a PLB may have saved him. Clarence
  10. Andrew, Will they be throwing in a few pairs of these for you? Clarence
  11. I've often wondered why so few here sign their post with a name, real or fake? Clarence
  12. Be thankful you don't own a Cirrus, filter replacement is every 2 years regardless of of much TKS has passed through it. Clarence
  13. What does it tell you about this industry when the employees of such a well established business aren't interested in taking it over? Clarence
  14. Re the time to carry out the fuel line AD there are two different scenarios. An owner who taxis to the shop for compliance will encounter more labour than an owner who's plane is already in the shop for an Annual inspection. I presume the FAA suggested labour relates to the former. Clarence
  15. George, with the engine warmed up and idling, smoothly pull the mixture control to cut off. If the tachometer drops off with no decernable rise, the idle mixture is too lean and requires adjustment. Too lean an idle mixture can cause the stumble you describe. Clarence