ArtVandelay

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About ArtVandelay

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  1. Can you actually share a single relief tube? Tom
  2. Has there ever been a case where the CFI was held responsible for what a student does, in his own plane. It appears that schools are sued because planes weren’t airworthy, 1 case they included the CFI for not taking control. But I couldn’t find where instructor was held responsible when not in their schools airplane. Tom
  3. I don’t understand why CFIs don’t form LLCs to limit their liability? While it doesn’t protect you if you do something wrong (ie you were flying the plane), it would protect you if the student is flying.
  4. Fourth alternative; adult diapers, no positioning required. I have no first hand knowledge on their effectiveness. Tom
  5. Note, I said “With certified planes, they have gone through tests to insure some level of quality.” I never said they were perfect. Also those ADs and SBs are on planes designed long before we could do computer simulations, at least in the small GA plane world. It’s hard to fault manufacturers for problems showing up in planes designed decades ago. Not sure if it’s true, but been told Cessna thought planes only had to last 15 years, like automobiles.
  6. Does anyone have a picture of this part, just for own curiosity, I’m wondering how difficult it would be to fabricate? Tom
  7. I would put it where the STEC unit usually resides, left of the radio stack. The single knob of the G5 requires multiple actions (turn, push) to do any single command. Tom
  8. I think the contrast looks good, so light background with black face steam gauges, dark background with modern light colored avionics. Tom
  9. First, the 737 MAX crashed because the pilots couldn’t handle a software problem. You can argue that Boeing didn’t provide information or they weren’t trained properly, but the airplane was just fine until the pilots crashed it. While Experimental doesn’t mean poor quality, there is no history of planes that you can look at and judge the quality. You buy an experimental, you are assuming the risk that the person(s) who built it and designed it was competent. With certified planes, they have gone through tests to insure some level of quality. Tom
  10. If I interpret your airport diagram correctly, the black represents the landing area, but you have extension of the runway on both ends, effectively making it much longer. Tom
  11. The key is the difference in temperatures of the cylinder head and barrel. They are screwed together by heating the cylinder head to expand it, and refrigerating barrel to shrink it, after equalizing it forms an interference fit. That’s why the opposite may cause a crack barrel. It’s not the rate of heating or cooling, it’s the difference of temperatures. Tom
  12. I have to believe the worst case is flying high where it’s cold, pulling power, descending thru cold precipitation. Water can cool faster than air, turbo can allows engine to make power and cylinders to be hot. Cylinder head cools and shrinks while barrel remains hot and expanded, resulting in a cracked cylinder head. I think it was an effort to explain cracked cylinder heads...as oppose to a manufacturing defect. Tom