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  1. This is the rectifier for an AL12P70 plane power alternator. Easy to swap. https://www.maniacelectricmotors.com/100mm-alternator-rectifier-denso-60-80-amp-8mm-post-inr720xhd.html
    6 points
  2. Old time automotive alternator and starter shop could likely repair plus put in new brushes. Wear your John Deere hat, mumble something about a manure spreader, and the proper answer concerning the manufacture of the alternator is “huh.”
    5 points
  3. Hello everyone! I am posting the video of a really nice flight I did with my daughter and her boyfriend over the Hudson, across Manhattan over N. Central Park, and back down the East River using the Skyline Route in Class B airspace. It was a first for all three of us as well as the first time for Chris flying in a small plane. NY ATC was just amazing as well. I also had Chris fly for a bit to get him enthused. Flew out of Lakewood, NJ which was a great airport as well. Quirky winds though which almost always seem to be crosswinds from every possible direction... Enjoy!! Chris
    3 points
  4. You betcha. You’ll be surprised how many people had DVTs and never knew. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    3 points
  5. This should help keep you guys from hijacking my flying threads. And we'll get to find out if this is the latest Mooney flyers fashion.
    3 points
  6. So a few things about this... The antenna itself doesn't pass self-test...the unit passes the TAS self-test when the TAS portion of the computer resolves that there's an antenna present - whether that antenna is working properly or not. All it does is sense a connection is present. Unless you or a previous owner beat the snot out of your TAS antenna, and it became physically-damaged (which, by looking at your airplane doesn't seem to be the case), your antenna is not the culprit. I still advocate for moving the thing to the front of the airplane and using the attached guide as your template. These antennas are rock-solid. I've installed three, and doing another on my own Ovation next week. They are like miniature radars. Some commercial jets use them (albeit, the NY156 flavor) on their TCAS-II installations, and they simply "just work". I have yet to see one go bad. After what you're saying you've verified above, the most-likely culprits you're seeing are (in this order)... Connections - you have three on this antenna - Sum, Difference, and Probe. One is BNC, the other two are TNC. Despite many shops' best intentions, these seem to be where some installations fall short - the crimping and proper connections made to ends that connect to these interfaces. Making these terminating connections isn't easy...it's a bit of an art. So in your case, you have six areas (three on the antenna, three on the NGT) where even if one connection is not solid, you will have issues. Type of cable - I suggest (if not already done) using RG142 or RG400 for these wire runs. Do not make any sharp bends in ANY cable run. I would remove as much of the older RG58 (if you have it) from your aircraft as you can. Antenna location - Drawings below for reference.
    3 points
  7. A few possible fails here. Something wrong in the maintenance, and in the flight training. Your first manual gear extension for training should have been done in the shop on jacks. Clarence
    3 points
  8. It’s part of the diode rectifier bridge. It’s a 35$ part. It’s replaceable.
    3 points
  9. When I was a resident I was doing a rectal exam on a patient and right as I was getting started my attending told the patient “Don’t worry, the young doctor is very thorough. He’s going to use two fingers so he can get a second opinion.”
    2 points
  10. I’ll share a little more detail on blood clots. I have had DVTs twice. I went through reaaaallly extensive tests (full body MRIs, genetic tests, etc.) to determine the cause (my family has 0 history of it). None of the tests could identify the cause. I have read that some researchers believe a non-identified gene still may be to blame. I was fortunate that I didn’t throw any pulmonary embolisms. Both episodes occurred after really long business trips. The first time I knew I was a bit dehydrated but had no idea how sitting dehydrated and not moving could result in DVTs. There were warning signs (swelling ankles for one) that I ignored. The second time came 7 years later. I was cattle packed on an international flight and due to turbulence, didn’t drink much. I had my compression socks on and was on 81 mg aspirin. I should have been doing leg exercises and forced myself to drink more and let the attendants deal with the puddle under my seat. [emoji15] Since the last episode, I am extremely careful flying long legs. I fly shorter legs in my plane, drink water like a fish, have an Amazon subscription to Travel Johns [emoji13] and make sure my AP is in top shape so I can stretch the legs and get in those leg exercises. Here is the sobering point. Since I had a number of follow up visits for ultrasounds on my legs to determine the extent of scarring, I got to know the techs well. I asked a few of them if they ever saw patients who clearly had evidence of old DVTs but didn’t know they had them - everyone of them said yes. Just because you’re young doesn’t mean you can’t get them. Serena Williams, Joey Sindelar and Jimmy Bosh got them. Along with a number of other young athletes. Not to mention Jimmy Stewart died from a clot in his lung as well as Gary Shandling from a clot in his heart. Sorry for soap box, but after my experiences, thought it would be beneficial to share my experiences. It is a sneaky killer… Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    2 points
  11. Clearly the IPC number has dropped a 1 from the p/n should be 111 hose type. The Parker 111 hose manual might be helpful. https://www.parker.com/Literature/Stratoflex Products Division/SPD Literature Static Files/SPD Rubberhose_111.pdf Clarence
    2 points
  12. I'd try mineral spirits next, then acetone if that doesn't work. Usually mineral spirits will get it unless it has been on a long time. Be careful with either to not leave it too much on too long to damage the finish.
    2 points
  13. It seems like it might not be a good idea to jam a big piece of silicone into that moving part on a Mooney.
    2 points
  14. Even at a burdened rate of $75/hour, which is probably too low, that's $675000 per aircraft just for labor. I wouldn't be surprised if the actual burdened rate is higher, but with that much labor requirement it looks like a difficult proposition for economic success.
    2 points
  15. Since we're reviving old discussions I'd like to add this bit of info on ways to make Mooney production viable. I'm working with a client in his DA40 NG, a 160hp liquid cooled turbo diesel powered DA40. From an engine operation perspective it's like driving a car. Turn the key, the engine starts, move the single power lever to where you need it to be, measured in % load on the engine. No mixture control, no prop control, those are controlled by redundant Electronic Engine Control Units. Which means no need to monitor/control EGT or CHT as those are monitored and controlled by the EECUs. EGT and CHT aren't even displayed in the cockpit. You set the desired % power and monitor the RPM for overspeed. While this makes teaching a primary flight student a bit of a challenge with regards to learning the ins and outs of mixture and prop control for the purposes of passing his written and practical oral exams, it makes a huge difference in ownership and operation by eliminating many of the fine detail skills we have to develop for priming, cold starts, hot starts, leaning, temperature management, you name it. All of the PITA stuff associated with managing our non-EECU controlled engines. Like build time reductions, we've talked diesel engine options before. But now that I've been exposed to an airplane with one I am a huge fan. Marketing seems to be everything in the contemporary aviation market. If a Mooney could be powered by an essentially care-free EECU controlled diesel it could be spun into a good marketing campaign. Unfortunately cockpit access ease and useful load will still be a competitive disadvantage, and then there's the 'chute thing. If I can identify a suitable turbo diesel maybe I'll take my Bravo experimental and play. Sure I could pursue an EECU controlled gas engine but I believe diesel has a better chance of surviving the current fuel politics. Cheers, Rick
    2 points
  16. 2 points
  17. My turn Mike. Leaving Longview Tx this morning for Delaware plan on nonstop also just Need to borrow your pants
    2 points
  18. What's good about only building one length Mooney is that that airframe can be quite a ways down the assembly line before they have to commit to whether it's going to be an Ovation or an Acclaim. The J airframe would cost roughly as much to build as the Acclaim or Ultra. The extra aluminum for the long body can't be more than a few hundred dollars. The wing is the same. The engine might be $30,000 - $50,000 less. Twenty five years ago when they built the last Allegro you could run the price up to $350,000 fully loaded. Just accounting for inflation that's $650,000 today and aviation parts have gone up more than inflation. Ironically if Mooney had Ovations and Acclaims they could sell them right now. Any used Mooney that's a good airframe is selling right now including the ones at the very high end. The highest Cirrus SR22T you can load up all the way up to 1.3 million and there's at least a year wait to get one. New Cessna 172s are $470,000 and the wait is almost two years. We don't have to understand it, but we can't deny it's happening.
    2 points
  19. It may be impossible, but I hope some technology or innovation will come along that can knock those hours in half. Maybe a return to the basic J model without huge engines and hand stitched leather interiors would help? It doesn’t matter what the profit margin is if no one buys the airplane. A 4 place single is simply not viable at almost a million a copy. Sure, Cirrus seems to have cracked that nut, but I suspect that niche is tapped out. Totally my uneducated opinion, but if Mooney can’t produce a J type model for less than 500,000.00, the game is up. I am not even sure that price point is viable, especially with the consummate crushing of the middle class.
    2 points
  20. A normal creeper is fine for the belly but anything from the main landing gears across the bottom of the wing, the angle is very uncomfortable to apply elbow grease. That is where it would come in handy
    2 points
  21. I”ve seen SCAT tube cause an intermittent short by rubbing an unprotected terminal. A Canadian Mooneyspacer got stuck at my airport on Xmas Eve a few years ago for that very reason. Clean and protect terminals thoroughly before you dig deeper.
    2 points
  22. I’ve never done a plane power alternator. If it was a prestolite, the parts manuals are available on line and parts are readily available. I would look for the parts manual for the alternator. You may end up at the NAPA store.
    2 points
  23. Awesome job picking a field and ensuring that the insurance company’s airplane delivered all her passengers safely to the ground! I hope she can be saved too, but nothing to think about while dealing with that kind of stress!
    2 points
  24. Down safe, no injuries! Can't ask for more than that! Great job by the pilot. Thanks for doing the relay. Had to've made him feel better.
    2 points
  25. Thank God I just put a bag of popcorn in the microwave.
    2 points
  26. Just bought my first Mooney . . . a 1956 Mk20 wood wing. I knew the previous owner and the owner before him. So, she might have been your "girl" at one time too, but she's all mine now. Just wondering how many of the "woodies" are still flying? I searched the enormous amount of threads and found a few posts from a couple years ago. Maybe start a new conversation? I received a whole lot of great info from the previous owners and have a pretty good network of resources. This particular plane (N5227B) has less than 2,000 TT, 250 SMOH, new interior and paint. Starting to get to know her and work on some of the important things for these old gals. Anyway, I'll share some pics. BTW, she lives where she was born back in 1956 (KERV). Airworthiness is signed by Charlie Dugosh! Bill
    1 point
  27. I recently swapped out my Hartzell prop for the MT composite 4 blade and have had a chance to fly it a bit and thought I would post a report on what I have observed. Special thanks to Erik B. and Scott S. who provided me counseling on their experiences. By the way, my Hartzell is listed for sale with a complete overhaul. Buying Process - I ordered mine from Flight Resources. The delivery took 4 weeks, 1/2 down up front and 1/2 when it ships from Germany. You must have the prop shipped to a MT authorized prop shop for final assembly. I had mine shipped to Jordan Propeller in San Antonio. From there, the prop shop can deliver the prop to your A&P for installation and balance. It is recommended that you have the prop balanced. The spinner is a composite material and I had mine painted Matterhorn White to match the plane. Years ago most piston props were delivered with stainless leading edges. The restrictions to paint choices in Germany had many MT props shedding paint. The turbine application is for a nickel leading edge which wraps around longer and covers more of the prop. Also the paint formula has been modified and is much better in regards to wear and tear than the earlier props. Today, most pistons (like mine) have nickel edges and the new paint formula. Sound and Ergonomics - as mentioned elsewhere the prop is very quiet and smooth. It is German so I will say it is similar to driving a German engineered car. There is a certain smoothness and solid feel that I seem to get in the Mooney. Not to take anything away from other manufacturers but the prop does seem to maintain tight tolerances that are felt in the plane. Taxi, cruise and all aspects of flight seem to be much more quiet. Performance- I have one trip of 4 hours each way to pirep the prop. Takeoff performance is better although I do not have the hard data. The transfer of power from your power adjustments is instantaneous it feels. Moving to full throttle has no spool up time, its just gets there. Same for power reductions. No over speed conditions. I am still trying to get before and after take off distances and climb. Today I was climbing at 1100 fpm at 120 knots and 2500 rpm. I saw 700 fpm at 145 kts, 2500 rpm in a cruise climb. In cruise it is hard to tell but I think it may be the same speeds. I have logged many speeds and at some settings I was a knot faster but at others I was equal to the Hartzell. I do not feel I lost any speed with the 4 blades. 9000 ft, LOP -30, 12C, 21.6MP 2450rpm 12.9 gph at 171kts 9000 ft, ROP +100 12C 21.7MP 2450rpm 17.2gph at 177kts 8000 ft LOP -40 11C 22.5MP 2450rpm 13.6gph at 172kts 8000 ft ROP +100 11C 22.6MP 2450rpm 17.8gph at 176kts I am still getting used to landings. I have to carry a bit more power now to maintain 80kts on final. It used to be 12-13" and now it is over 13". The prop does seem to have a kind of braking effect when you twist it to the stops. I slow down very quickly but if you twist it to the stops while flaring it will stop flying so a lot of the float has been eliminated. Weight and Balance - Empty weight dropped around 30lbs and CG moved about 1.25" aft. (I left my POH in the hangar so don't quote me on those numbers) I put together a video to show the sound inside and out and also the look. Be gentle with me, I am not a producer. Russ Russ
    1 point
  28. Recently while flying right seat with my buddy in his Cherokee 180 we were having a ton of trouble with his comm radios. The noise levels were high and we were having trouble understanding anything. It stopped when we unplugged my USB charger that was connected to one of my tablets, the same one I've been using in my airplane for quite a while to power the tabs and the Stratux. We plugged one of his USB chargers in and did not have any further issues with the radios. I do radio comm for a living, so, naturally I had to nerd out on this and did some characterization with a spectrum analyzer: http://ericjacobsen.org/Files/USB_Power_Supply_RF_analysis_2.pdf Bottom line: the RF output level varies significantly between different examples of generic chargers, and may vary significantly with an individual charger depending on input voltage and current load. The quietest charger I tested was a cheapie give-away that has Wells Fargo branding on it. So go figure, but if you're having radio trouble try unplugging your chargers and if they're problematic just try a different one, even a cheap one. You probably already knew that, but thought I'd throw this out there, anyway.
    1 point
  29. I see that there's a 36W version of the Anker out there now. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08JX444KV/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A1KWJVS57NX03I&psc=1 More power is always better on the long trips and the long summer days. Anyone happen to have tried it yet?
    1 point
  30. I have a 50A gen and it is a rock solid at 14.1V above 2000rpm. If I saw a fluctuation, I would be concerned.
    1 point
  31. I’ve found MEK works the best. It doesn’t dissolve the paint on my plane, which I believe is polyurethane. Well it dissolves the fuel stains faster than the paint. I wipe on the solvent with a chip brush and then immediately wipe it off with a paper towel before it evaporates. You should ware gloves while doing this so the solvents don’t push the TEL through your skin.
    1 point
  32. Here's a start: https://mooneyspace.com/search/?q="fuel stain"&quick=1&updated_after=any&sortby=relevancy
    1 point
  33. Besides, you always wear cargo pants - who would know you had them? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    1 point
  34. While I agree that it would be better to do your first one in the shop on jacks, my first one was in my transition training too. And it also went horribly wrong. The “Mooney” cfi kind of guessed how to go through the exercise, and I didn’t know any better. We followed the checklist and got the gear down, but there’s no checklist to get it back up. We failed to disengage the manual crank and it spun real fast backwards when we engaged the motor up. Could have destroyed my knee and destroyed the manual system. I got lucky and no damage. The Mooney manual backup system may not be perfect in every failure. It seems most applicable to a loss of electrical power to the gear motor. In that case, it works really well. If somehow your electric motor is jammed/seized, the backup is likely useless. I’m not saying that happens, but the manual system just manually actuates the primary system. Let us know what you find out.
    1 point
  35. I've owned Mooneys for 30 years and followed them longer than that . I've even gone back and studied them when they were producing hundreds of airplanes a year at times in the 60's and 70's because I was confused also as to why Mooney isn't a household word when it comes to airplanes. In one word what they have lacked over the years is stability. Stability in company ownership, capital, vision, etc. They've had it at times (late 60's, late 70's-early 80's) and done well, but have never had it long term. They have also been victims of notoriously bad timing. They would just get things going with good products and marketing (early 90's) and then the company would get sold ('96-'97) to someone that wanted to change everything. Then they got it going again and 9/11 happens which leads to bankruptcy. They restructured and get things rolling again with the GX Mooneys (G1000) and have a backlog to produce and introduced the Acclaim shortly thereafter and have another backlog and then the financial crisis of 2008 hits and everything comes to a screeching halt. I think at that time they had 45 unsold airplanes sitting around. They keep a skeleton crew and in a few years get new ownership and decide to start making airplanes in 2014 and they start to sell a few, but in less than two years into it they announce, well before certification, that they are going to produce the Ultra, which immediately halts sales of existing units. (Marketing 101: Keep it under wraps until you can deliver it) No sales while the long wait for certification happens and the owners rightfully become impatient and pull out. It's been a roller coaster ride for sure but if they can produce parts for the fleet and make parts for others on a contract basis to demonstrate profitability, who knows? Maybe they can raise the capital to once again make airplanes. This time maybe custom-made for the individual with a 90 day to 6 month wait. Hard to do though on such an emotionally-driven purchase. (The personality of most aircraft buyers is such that they believe that the only thing wrong with instant gratification is that it takes too long.)
    1 point
  36. Gonna be at OSH again this year with my Culver, parked in “affordable vintage” on the flight line near the Red Barn, come say hi..
    1 point
  37. His signature line says he is an IA. Clarence
    1 point
  38. The Piper Cherokee series have an FAA AD on oil cooler transfer hoses. Rubber hoses with a fire sleeve have an 8 year/2000 hour life. Teflon hoses with fire sleeve have no life per the AD. I know of no such SB or AD on Mooney airframes. From the current IO-360 IPC, Lycoming lists both rubber as well as Teflon hoses being approved. See the foot notes at the bottom of the page Clarence
    1 point
  39. Since the manual extension turns the electric motor for the normal extension system, and that was replaced at annual, I’m guessing they were definitely working on it. It’s a pretty simple system, so shouldn’t be hard to figure out once you pull the belly panels. Did you pull the circuit breaker and follow the checklist?
    1 point
  40. For what it's worth, I update my GNS 430W nav database card every month on a mac using the Garmin software and have not had any issues. The mac being used is the current operating system, but an older macbook laptop. I had more issues with Jepp software compatibility with the mac which forced the switch, along with lower costs.
    1 point
  41. Did you follow the Poh instructions, pull the breaker, engage the crank, then it takes about 50+ cranks. also, it is not recommended to practice this in the air, these units are fragile. Have your mechanic put it on jacks, then practice.
    1 point
  42. I’ll second Steven’s comments about whether or not you are seeing TAS targets. I have noticed a significant drop off of TAS targets over the past couple of years. Also keep in mind Mode A/C are the typical TAS targets. I believe Mode S is treated differently. Another thing to do is review the limitations that unit puts on TAS reporting. It won’t provide advisories for these targets unless they meet the criteria indicated in the Lynx POH. Here is an example of some of the limitations: Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    1 point
  43. I left the KGGG (the MooneyMax conference) this morning for KSAT. I was with AUS approach when I heard a Mooney, N1169N declare an emergency stating engine failure. The controller asked him if he lost "both engines" (sigh) he said, he had only one. Controller offered him San Marcos, he said he could not make it. I said, "Throttle, prop, mixture, check the fuel valve, boost pump on, check mags". I don't know if he heard me or I was covered because he did not respond. Then the controller who was busy with Austin departures coming at him hot and heavy said, "I-35 below you" but there was no response. N1169N said, "We're going for a field". Then the controller re-stated I-35 but then he announced "Radar contact lost" and I think he was too low for radio too. I told the controller I would relay, I re-stated the controller's I-35 announcement, and N1169N announced he was "down in a field, no injuries, needed nothing from us other than tell Austin". I relayed the same back to Austin approach and continued on to KSAT. FlightAware shows it departed Georgetown and is registered to an LLC in Austin. Anybody know this J model?
    1 point
  44. Jonny Pollack said at Mooney Max it takes 9000 man hours to create a Mooney. He said it is a very labor intensive airplane to produce and if they do their best, their gross margin is about 15%. Not viable in today's market.
    1 point
  45. Adding to the list of mods, this one doesn’t show any increase in TAS but it looks faster on the ground. Starting to look more like a J… Top Gun in Stockton installed them at my last annual, very happy with the outcome. 8 hours labor, $1500 for the four new windows. I went with dark gray single piece back windows, and to keep the colors similar I went with UV solar gray for the front and added a couple pilot window vent. Noticeably cooler and the rear window view is fantastic. Highly recommend the dark gray tint and UV gray.
    1 point
  46. No problem. I understand and figure you will get to my membership when you get to it. Thanks for your hard work. Glad you are over the strain of COVID you had.
    1 point
  47. @carusoamyou have make my day. I am here help any way I can. I hope people take advantage of over 30 year of experience and about 5,000 paint job. From a Global express to a home build aircraft, and from solid color, metallic, pearls, and micas. have a blessing day.
    1 point
  48. The weight and balance envelope on my 1982 Mooney M20K with a 305 Rocket conversion is so nose heavy that the weight and balance envelope will hardly allow for pilot, copilot and fuel without exceeding weight limitations or forward CG limitations. Let alone adding any passengers and luggage. Can tail ballast be added to bring the CG more Aft. Who is authorized to do it and who has the knowledge to do it?
    1 point
  49. Indeed. But speaking specifically instead of generally. And not generally based on a thought experiment of changing a prop of n blades for a prop of n+1 blades of otherwise identical build, shape, material. Specifically - switching from a 3 blade round tipped McCauley that was on my airplane. The prop was 35lb lighter off the nose that changed my W&B significantly. Especially the balance. Aerodynamics of the prop were significantly different. Both for reasons of the shape, and also because the MT blades are a compliant material and they bend under load scooping air but the metal blades did not bend in any significant way. Speed did not decrease at least and I would say it increased. Climb increased. Sound decreased. Balance harmony road feel improved.
    1 point
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